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Kitchen Notes: Cutting Up Chicken
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Lee
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 05, 2005 11:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Re: Butterflying

We butterfly turkeys at our house, then cook on the gas grill. I saw the technique on a PBS show, but they cooked their bird in the oven. When the bird is brined first and cooked pretty fast, this yields the juiciest turkey.
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Lisa
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 05, 2005 11:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you! I've always wondered how this is properly done.
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an anonymous reader
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 05, 2005 11:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

On one of his shows, I saw Martin Yan cut up a chicken. He said he would do it in under a minute; he came in closer to twenty seconds.
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perrine
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 05, 2005 11:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi,
It is perfect since I always struggle against thighs... However, is it the same technic when the chicken is roasted? Thanks a lot!!!
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1616
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Fri Aug 05, 2005 11:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

re: carving a roast chicken

The technique is similar, but you deal with the breast a little differently. I have a pictoral attached tot he bottom of the Classic Roast Turkey recipe at
http://www.cookingforengineers.com/article.php?id=74
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vinal
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 05, 2005 11:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

As an engineer, the presentation couldn't be better, it was well done and straight to the point.

Is there a specific name for the knife shown, as in deboning knife ?

Want to get a good reputable knife. Any suggestions ?
Thanks
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1616
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Fri Aug 05, 2005 11:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

re: knife used

The knife used in this pictoral is an 8 in. Chef's knife. I chose this knife because I was able to effectively work dextrously with it while still having the ability to push through bones when I needed to. A boning knife would give you a great deal more control, but is not useful when trying to cut through the keel bone.

We'll use a boning knife for preparing a boneless chicken.

I've added some comments to the article on what instruments were used in this procedure.
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Kim from York
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 05, 2005 11:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great Site however Meats should always be carved, cut, dressed,on plastic or something less porus than wood. Bacteria has a tendency to to get trapped in the cuts on the wood not easily cleaned out.
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1616
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Fri Aug 05, 2005 11:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

re: wood vs. plastic cutting boards

As I mentioned in the Cutting Boards article, wood butting boards do not harbor bacteria. In fact, most kitchens have cleaner wood cutting baords than plastic because home chef's do not replace their plastic cutting boards often enough.

Conventional wisdom states that because you cut grooves into wood cutting boards, bacteria can be trapped in those micro-grooves allowing rampant growth of germs. This is true, but a thorough scrubbing will clean out all large particles and as the wood dries, the wood naturally becomes a hostile environment killing any surface bacteria and drawing the rest deep into the board (away from the surface).

Plastic boards on the other hand will develop small grooves from cuts and these won't "heal" (soften to form a continuous surface). The bacteria is much harder to get out even with severe scrubbing. Plastic cutting boards that have touched meast or poultry should go through a dishwasher cycle to heat kill the bacteria since washing and drying does not have the germicidal effect of wood boards. Also, once the board has developed too many grooves, the board should be replaced.

Link to Equipment & Gear: Cutting Boards
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Alderete
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 05, 2005 11:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Regarding Martin Yan's speedy chicken processing. I read where he and Jacques Pepin have speed competitions for deboning chickens, when they get together on PBS shows and such.

Martin uses a Chinese cleaver, Jacques uses a chef's knife. They both go like lightening.

It's probably scary to watch, as well as a amazing. Shows what just a little practice will get you...
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an anonymous reader
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 05, 2005 11:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

...where the thigh bone meets the drumstick, one can easly see a line of fat that marks the angle to cut. Nature shows the way!
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an anonymous reader
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 05, 2005 11:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

There's an easy way to find the thigh joint. First cut the skin and fleshy bits on the frontal groin portion of the chicken between the leg and the breast. Next, push back the thigh into a good ballet-style turnout, keep pushing the "knee" backwards towards the chicken's back and the thighbone will *pop* right out of the pelvic joint. It's easy to then just cut through the little bit of soft fleshy material in the joint.
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Connie
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 05, 2005 11:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I was looking for a roasted potato technique and found your site. (After 25 years of cooking for my family I have found a difference between cooking techniques and recipes.)

RE: cutting up chicken...if your look carefully at the joints you will see a fine line of fat which appears as a thin white strip under the skin. Cut through this line of fat and you hit the joint each time. It's visible on every joint you cut.
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sidoc
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 23, 2005 1:01 pm    Post subject: site Reply with quote

Just wanted to thank you for a great site: well laid out, clear rationale (eg, use of salt water in marinade for chicken), helpful pics. I'll try to post the outcome of the chile lime grilled chicken! B
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Guest






PostPosted: Wed Sep 07, 2005 1:56 am    Post subject: Cutting chickleg joint Reply with quote

Back in the poor student stage, this was the way I came up with.

I grap the chick leg with my left hand and the rest of the chicken by my right hand so that my thumbs towards each other (almost like vectors). I can easily determine where the joint based on the way the legs can rotate. The place where my two thumbs eventually lined up where there is a slight depression between. There's where I make my cut.
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