Cooking For Engineers Forum Index Cooking For Engineers
Analytical cooking discussed.
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Recipe File: Beef Stroganoff
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Cooking For Engineers Forum Index -> Comments Forum
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Pete Mac
Guest





PostPosted: Tue Jun 29, 2010 5:21 pm    Post subject: Beef Stroganoff . Comments over the past 5 years. Reply with quote

I've enjoyed reading all this stuff and the many variations on...er...beef Stroganoff. I'm having friends for dinner tomorrow night and will cook my classic Strog with finely crossgrain-cut fillet steak, onion, thick sliced mushys, nutmeg, and creme fraiche. I might throw in a couple of shots of brandy but there the quirks end. Serve wqith Tilda basmati, which I reckon to be the best. It takes 10 minutes while we all slurp wine and moan about footy in my kitchen. Boringly basic but wonderful. Gets better as the wine flows. I like Michael Chu's recipe, but I'd get rid of the Dijon. Cheers!
Back to top
marty mcguinn
Guest





PostPosted: Fri Dec 03, 2010 10:14 pm    Post subject: request for information - error and omissions - stroganoff Reply with quote

your ingredient list does not include noodles (or rice) (which are referenced later in the instructions). this poses a major problem as one would go to the store and not have a major component on their shopping list.

i understand you reference it in the overall content but it must be indicated in the actual list... its common sense.

and for that reason, i hope you have errors and omissions insurance as an engineer. this kind of thing would get you sued or even worse someone could get hurt in the world on engineering.

if you were put before my quality assurance program, this project would be a disapproved -revise and resubmit.

also your confirmation code protocol is very weak. go back to the original pleae..

Marty McGuinn, PE
Principal McGuinn and Associates.
Mastermind of the Astoreiel Structural Benefactor Program.
25 Patents in 15 Countries and Inventor of the world famous SkyHook (tm).
Back to top
Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1025
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Fri Dec 03, 2010 11:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Marty -

what ingredient list?

sentence one of the article digest:
/quote
Beef Stroganoff, in its simplest form, is simply tender beef with a mushroom and sour cream sauce served over rice or noodles.
/unquote

>>(which are referenced later in the instructions).
later is worse than the first sentence?

btw, real engineers read through all the specs before bidding.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
marty-SKYHOOK (TM)
Guest





PostPosted: Sun Dec 05, 2010 9:50 pm    Post subject: touche- Reply with quote

nice retort.. i can admit when i am wrong but. you have a paragraph that indicates the ingredients:

"Begin by assembling the ingredients: 1-1/2 lb. beef tenderloin (if using another cut, select a lean cut and remove any excess fat, gristle, or membranes), 1/2 medium onion, 1/2 lb. button mushrooms, 3/4 cup to 1 cup beef broth (preferably low sodium - salt can always be added but is difficult to take out), 2 tablespoons of cognac, 1 cup sour cream, 1 tablespoon of Dijon mustard, and 1 teaspoon of dried dill weed. "

also, your graph does not indicate egg noodles..

as we are both engineers we can dispute the nuances till we are blue in the face.. i was just trying to poke a little fun at a comrade... take it lightly..

all said and done the recipe was AWESOME.. totally delicious.. would make again, with egg noodles of course..

keep up the great work fellow engineer.

GREAT SITE

marty-

skyhook (tm) us patent AE129030992
Back to top
Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1025
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Mon Dec 06, 2010 7:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Marty -

nadda problem, I can do 'light' -

as you intended no serious barb - I would add.... over rice or noodles means the chart must incorporate either / or / both - the plot thickens. ps: it's Michael that does the charts, not me - but I think they're pretty neat.

the instructions also do not include "turn the knob to the right" to make heat on the cooktop.
bottom line: at some point one must assume the cook has a passing knowledge of what the heck is going on.

the recipe does not also explicity state "use a spoon to stir...."

where does it end? how big a pot to put how much water in to cook how many noodles?

is this the most appropriate set of directions for someone who has zip comma zero idea of how to cook or what "Beef Strongoff" is but thinks it sounds neat for dinner? perhaps not - they may not know how to cook rice or noodles. is that the point? no, methinks.

noodles, or rice, taste pretty much like noodles or rice for any other dish. the point is how to "make the beef" - as Clara might have said.

and actually, pretty much all the noodle crowd has eggs - it's part of the pasta routine,,,, some are more eggie than others - and in the pasta aisle you'll find narrow, wide, extra wide egg noodles, curly noodles as well - so so far as most reasonable cooks go, "served over rice or noodles" is about 99.99998% all they need to be clued in on. everyone has their favorite noodle type/shape/size/brand. I'll skip the part about serving it over spaetzle...

btw, I went to www.uspto.gov - was unable to come up with any reference to any part of AE129030992; nor does Google; might want to check into that.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1635
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2010 12:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sorry, for not chiming in earlier. I obviously agreed with Dilbert when I wrote this recipe over five years ago, but I also understand Marty's point about not showing the carb component in the final summary can lead to trouble. In light of the discussion, I was thinking about adding something, but beef stroganoff can be served over so many different "bases" like rice, noodles, dumplings, spaetzle (as Dilbert pointed out) that it seems like it would be difficult to add to the summary without seemingly limiting this recipe. Perhaps, I'll simply add to the serving size area - something like "(over rice or noodles, serves 4)".

As for the skyhook patent, I was also curious to read it and unable to find it. The number portion is too long for a US Patent, isn't it? My last patent, from 2005, was just shy of #7,000,000, and more recent patents are around 11-12,000,000. Anyway, I'm guessing the skyhook part of Marty's sig is a joke. Skyhook references used to be popular with some older engineers I worked with (as a way to send the younger engineers on a wild goose chase after something that doesn't exist), but these days there are a couple dozen different companies out there that make a product with the registered trademark Skyhook... I feel silly falling for that (again). Unless, there is a specific Skyhook that Marty invented, then I'd be more interested in hearing about it!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
turnbow1@aol.com
Guest





PostPosted: Sat Dec 11, 2010 5:02 am    Post subject: WOW! Reply with quote

Just made this stroganoff recipe and served for dinner. It is absolutely the best I have ever tasted and my guests are asking for the recipe. I used Flat Iron Steak and it was tender and delicious.
I love your website - I am a newcomer but will be back.
Thank you.
Back to top
CANDY LADY
Guest





PostPosted: Thu Dec 16, 2010 6:50 am    Post subject: secret recipe Reply with quote

My family has a completely different recipe for the "classic" beef stroganoff. My family's recipe comes from a Russian restaurant, in Hong Kong, circa 1954. So I'll admit it probably isn't the most "authentic." It is a tasty variation.

Instead of dijon, we used dried mustard. No booze, either. Extra secret ingredient instead of dill is marjoram. Yes on browning meat, onions, & mushrooms. We add water (or I guess stock would be easy), and cook until reduced and meat is tender. Also the spices/herbs are added after browning. Just before serving, add in sour cream. When I make it, I do noodles. When my grandmother makes it, it is always short grain white rice. I don't know why, but this is the tastiest version that I know of. It is probably a little milder than Chu's recipe, relying more on the natural sweetness of the onions, earthy mushrooms, browned meat, etc., and only rounded out with the marjoram & dried mustard (less vinegar, flavors compete less with beefiness). I love this as leftovers.
Back to top
Sugar n Spice
Guest





PostPosted: Sun Mar 06, 2011 12:58 am    Post subject: Beef Stroganoff Reply with quote

I just cooked this tonight. I used a left over standing rib roast which was original cooked on the rare side. I trimmed all the fat and used the outside pieces of fat with the onions to establish that so desired brown bits on the bottom of the pan. I didn't have any Cognac (but I will definately get some) - I used red wine, it made the sauce yummy still but turned it an awful purple. I also didn't have any dijon mustard - I substituted hot horseradish. I didn't have any noodles or rice but I had fresh Naan bread. I will stick to the recipe here next time and comment again. This was a very yummy meal.
Back to top
daniel
Guest





PostPosted: Mon Apr 04, 2011 4:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I once did this dish an its awesome. I belive i kinda failed in the cutting of the meat and it affected the final product tough. Lets say I have the cilindrical part of the T.m then, should I cut transversal sections of it and then cut each one of those into "bars" of meat?? Or how else??
Back to top
Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1635
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Mon Apr 04, 2011 7:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

daniel wrote:
I once did this dish an its awesome. I belive i kinda failed in the cutting of the meat and it affected the final product tough. Lets say I have the cilindrical part of the T.m then, should I cut transversal sections of it and then cut each one of those into "bars" of meat?? Or how else??

That's the best way to do it - cut into transversal slices (ie. against the grain) and then into roughly equivalent sized bars about 1-in x 2-in. It doesn't take long to cook the slices, you want to do it only long enough to brown. Taste a piece as you cook each batch - if it's tough, you need to cook faster (higher heat). You should be looking for an extremely tender texture.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
fa
Guest





PostPosted: Mon Jun 20, 2011 6:10 am    Post subject: Beef stroganoff Reply with quote

my mom used to add a bit of red wine to the sauce, adds flavor and color
Back to top
Judycarol
Guest





PostPosted: Sun Mar 25, 2012 1:54 am    Post subject: Beef stroganoff Reply with quote

Have prepared this four times and will be preparing again Monday Evening for the same guest that lived in Europe for 12 years.
He says it is the best!!!!!
Back to top
sham
Guest





PostPosted: Mon Apr 02, 2012 1:20 am    Post subject: amazing! Reply with quote

just followed the recipe - well, I followed the ingredients (left out the dill) and the process, but was not precise with measurements.

anyways, it turned out amazing! thank you!!
Back to top
shoppe
Guest





PostPosted: Fri Feb 14, 2014 6:56 pm    Post subject: This is the best! Reply with quote Delete this post

Beef Stroganoff has always been my favourite dish. However, I lost my tried and true recipe for it over 30 years ago - just after university. Since then, I've made lots and lots and loooots of just so-so beef stroganoff.
I've made this recipe twice now. The first time was exactly as prescribed and the second was using stew beef. I can now say with confidence that this is even better than my lost recipe.
Thanks!
Back to top
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Cooking For Engineers Forum Index -> Comments Forum All times are GMT
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5
Page 5 of 5

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You can reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You can delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group