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Recipe File: Ratatouille
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esbee
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 10, 2007 4:26 am    Post subject: recipe like the movie Reply with quote

is there a recipe on how to make ratatouille so it looks just like what was in the pixar cartoon movie?
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luganrn
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 14, 2007 4:03 am    Post subject: Ratatouille ala movie Reply with quote

American chef Thomas Keller invented a contemporary variation, confit byaldi, for the film Ratatouille. Please go to the following link for more info:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Confit_byaldi
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student
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 06, 2008 2:57 am    Post subject: ratatouille Reply with quote

Just made it, it is really good, i dont usually like egg plant.
I love the site, the recipes are easy to follow and ingredients are simple!
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Chirpie
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 07, 2008 11:52 pm    Post subject: It's worth noting... Reply with quote

Ego ordered the Blanc 41 before he knew what he was eating. He was assuming the dish would be of extravagant origins, which made the Chef's choice all the more surprising. (And a great reminder of the emotional connection we can have to food)
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flunazuniga123@aol.com
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 11, 2008 10:48 pm    Post subject: ratatouille Reply with quote

Concerning Ms.Tina Hart comment I believe all vegetable dishes or meats and vegetables for that matter will have more flavor and better taste the day after. As my mother used to say the dish flavors will settle and blend better after a day has past.
As a frustrated engineer and would be cook I love your site
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Peter Zelchenko
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 16, 2008 11:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
re: eggplant - a simple way to avoid all the salting and rinsing is this - once the onions garlic etc are done add the eggplant separately and cook for a while before adding any other ingredients - this will remove the bitterness as it will cook off the fluid.


That doesn't make sense. How does merely evaporating the water out of the eggplant remove the bitter component that will remain in the pan? And once you add other liquids, it will be reinfused into the moisture.

From the responses I've read and from my experience, I think the salting will work, if you are patient and remove enough liquid. That means you need enough salt. You can actually take the eggplant and squeeze it as hard as you want, like a sponge, to get even more of liquid out. This is more appropriate for when you want to deep-fry eggplant, but it will get lots of moisture out.
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arkaren80
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 20, 2008 10:24 am    Post subject: What about nutrients? Reply with quote

If you keep squeezing the moisture out of the eggplants and then simmer the veggies for a long time in the pot, won't all the nutrients evaporate as well? What will the nutritive value of ratatouille be?
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1018
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Sun Jan 20, 2008 1:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

that eggplant is bitter may actually no longer be true - improved varieties do not demonstrate such a strong tendency. at one time, peeling eggplant was considered "mandatory" due to "bitterness" - that is definitely no longer true in my first hand experience.

salting the eggplant to remove water has another effect: slices / pieces maintain their shape and consistency better vs. going to mush when cooked.

same with sliced cucumbers in german cucumber salad - slice, salt, allow to stand & drain water keeps them crispier & crunchier.
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luv2cook
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 30, 2008 6:05 pm    Post subject: ratatoille Reply with quote

My mother-in-law taught me how to remove the bitterness of eggplant and I find it works very well. Slice the eggplant and layer on a baking sheet. Next sprinkle sugar lightly over all and let set for an hour. Rinse well before preparing your dish or the eggplant will be sweet. This method also firms up the flesh. I love this site.
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 10, 2008 9:22 pm    Post subject: an alternatıve for parsley? Reply with quote

Im plannıng on makıng thıs dısh for dınner tomorrow evening for my husband and frıend. The only thıng ıs we all hate parsley and was wonderıng what would be a good alternatıve. Also I only have drıed basıl so how much of that should I use ınstead ıf fresh??? Thanks cant waıt to get cookıng.
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flunazuniga123@aol.com
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2008 1:07 pm    Post subject: Re: an alternatıve for parsley? Reply with quote

Anonymous wrote:
Im plannıng on makıng thıs dısh for dınner tomorrow evening for my husband and frıend. The only thıng ıs we all hate parsley and was wonderıng what would be a good alternatıve. Also I only have drıed basıl so how much of that should I use ınstead ıf fresh??? Thanks cant waıt to get cookıng.


A good substitute for parsley is finely cut, fresh celery leaves to be used in small amounts as it is stronger tasting than parsley. Concerning the bitterness of the aubergine it is less so if one uses new or fresh ones, also I neutralize the bitterness by adding slices of apple on top of the aubergine when cooking the ingredients the way Remy did
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michael b
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 19, 2008 5:49 pm    Post subject: Ratatouille Reply with quote

Michael,

I happened to make Ratatouille the other night, and had really excellent results. The recipe I used did not use broth - and alternately used fresh tomatoes and no stock of any kind. Also - after browning the onions and eggplant, and adding the rest of the veges the cooking was finished in the oven with an herb garni. I'm sure there are 100s of variations on this, but have you ever tried it this way? My results were very stellar.
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 03, 2008 10:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

"Once some of the paste starts to still to the pan and brown, it's time to add the stock (about one minute)."

"still" = "stick", correct?
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1631
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Mon Mar 03, 2008 12:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Anonymous wrote:
"Once some of the paste starts to still to the pan and brown, it's time to add the stock (about one minute)."

"still" = "stick", correct?

Stick is correct. I've correct the article.
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pzelchenko
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 07, 2008 1:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

"correct" => "corrected", right?

(SICR)
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