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Knives: The Best of the Best of the Best
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PostPosted: Tue May 24, 2005 8:31 am    Post subject: Knives: The Best of the Best of the Best Reply with quote

Where to research:

http://www.knifeforums.com/ubbthreads/postlist.php?Cat=&Board=Kitchen

http://216.91.137.210/ubbthreads/postlist.php/Cat/0/Board/cutlery

Where to Buy:

http://www.japanesechefsknife.com/

http://www.epicureanedge.com/

http://www.korin.com/knife.php

Hand forged beauties @ amazing prices:

http://watanabeblade.com/english/

http://www.dento.gr.jp/takedahamono/e-kajiya/e_index.html

Sharpening:

http://www.shaptonstones.com/stones/Professional-Series.php
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DrBiggles



Joined: 12 May 2005
Posts: 355
Location: Richmond, CA

PostPosted: Sat May 28, 2005 10:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yeah, but you forgot Bob Kramer. He forges his own steel, even does Damascus. A co-worker just bought a 10" Cooks knife, pretty flippen amazing stuff.

http://www.bladesmiths.com/

Biggles

meathenge
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PostPosted: Tue May 31, 2005 1:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

DrBiggles wrote:
Yeah, but you forgot Bob Kramer.


Since I didn't make a statement declaring who I was attempting to include, I didn't forget anyone. My post intends to point those seeking the best knives in the right direction and I think it does that very well. Furthermore, Bob Kramer is mentioned on the forums that I linked for research. Regarding his work: I generally think his knives are gaudy and overpriced but I hear good things about their performance. I respect his work and hope that he comes out with more knives that I find aesthetically pleasing. I would be proud to own a Kramer
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DrBiggles



Joined: 12 May 2005
Posts: 355
Location: Richmond, CA

PostPosted: Tue May 31, 2005 3:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Anonymous wrote:
DrBiggles wrote:
Yeah, but you forgot Bob Kramer.


Since I didn't make a statement declaring who I was attempting to include, I didn't forget anyone. My post intends to point those seeking the best knives in the right direction and I think it does that very well. Furthermore, Bob Kramer is mentioned on the forums that I linked for research. Regarding his work: I generally think his knives are gaudy and overpriced but I hear good things about their performance. I respect his work and hope that he comes out with more knives that I find aesthetically pleasing. I would be proud to own a Kramer


Oh, lighten up. I was only poking fun. I had to, mostly because when I find someone who lays down the laws, I gotta find a hole.

And mostly because I hate new knives. It's a personal thing. I don't care what someone tells me about Sabatier, it's recycled crap that will snap when put to the test. Blech.

Biggles

www.meathenge.com
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PostPosted: Tue May 31, 2005 5:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

DrBiggles wrote:
Oh, lighten up. I was only poking fun. I had to, mostly because when I find someone who lays down the laws, I gotta find a hole.


I just had to make sure that everyone knows I'm a huge jerk. Also something I gotta do

DrBiggles wrote:
I don't care what someone tells me about Sabatier, it's recycled crap that will snap when put to the test. Blech.


I'm interested to hear what you've done with knives that have caused them to snap. Any stories?

DrBiggles wrote:
And mostly because I hate new knives. It's a personal thing.


Are you saying that it is difficult to buy virign steel these days? Would you mind sharing the knives that you do like? (not an attack, I've lightened up)
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DrBiggles



Joined: 12 May 2005
Posts: 355
Location: Richmond, CA

PostPosted: Wed Jun 01, 2005 5:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm interested to hear what you've done with knives that have caused them to snap. Any stories?

I put one inbetween the crack of a picnic table and whacked it! Kersnap! I've got a few friends that work in commerical kitchens, they've been there. But nothing personally, I don't cook all day. Don't want to either.

DrBiggles wrote:
And mostly because I hate new knives. It's a personal thing.


Are you saying that it is difficult to buy virign steel these days? Would you mind sharing the knives that you do like? (not an attack, I've lightened up)[/quote]

The knives I like are pre-1987 (major manufacturers went to recycled steel) high-carbon, but I only own 1. The other 2 dozen are all old carbon blades. My new favorites are the old rat-tail French carbon knives, light as a feather. I've got a 12" that feels like a 10" and weighs even less.
I believe if I had to buy new, it would be a nice Japanese rig. I hear they got some damned fine steel. But I don't know enough about them, some you sharpen only one side. That kind of stuff.

Biggles
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 03, 2005 8:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

DrBiggles wrote:
I believe if I had to buy new, it would be a nice Japanese rig.


For performance and aesthetics Japanese knives win hands down. For durability alone (Japs require a little more babying) the softer, thicker and clumsier German knives may still have an edge. The French blades you are talking about would most likely fall in between the two categories I just mentioned. My personal favorites are the hand forged Japanese rigs whether they be in the single bevel traditional style or the double bevel western style. I really enjoy ordering direct from the blacksmith and being able to truly customize the knife in question. I find single bevel knives to have more beautiful styling and maintaining them on a water stone is much easier. It can take double bevel users a little time to learn how a single bevel knife behaves as they tend to rotate towards the flat side when cutting through large objects (melons) so you have to exert torque in the opposite direction to get a straight cut. As far as sharpess is concerned, single bevel knives usually have a more acute angle and therefore a sharper, more delicate edge.

DrBiggles wrote:
The knives I like are pre-1987 (major manufacturers went to recycled steel) high-carbon


I really don't think post 1987 knives are an issue. I can buy carbon steel knives labeled "virgin steel" and if this label is true then I am not getting recycled steel. I am confident that when I buy a contemporary knife (virgin or non virgin) the only way it will break is if I misuse it. I actually like post 1987 steel a lot better because of powdered high carbon stainless steel knives that perform as well if not better than regular high carbon steel knives. An example of this would be the Hattori KD series with a Cowry X core:

http://www.japanesechefsknife.com/KDSeries.html

I would love to see a picture of your pre-1987 knife. A knife that old will have alot of character Smile
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DrBiggles



Joined: 12 May 2005
Posts: 355
Location: Richmond, CA

PostPosted: Fri Jun 03, 2005 7:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Anonymous wrote:
DrBiggles wrote:
I believe if I had to buy new, it would be a nice Japanese rig.


For performance and aesthetics Japanese knives win hands down. For durability alone (Japs require a little more babying) the softer, thicker and clumsier German knives may still have an edge. The French blades you are talking about would most likely fall in between the two categories I just mentioned. My personal favorites are the hand forged Japanese rigs whether they be in the single bevel traditional style or the double bevel western style. I really enjoy ordering direct from the blacksmith and being able to truly customize the knife in question. I find single bevel knives to have more beautiful styling and maintaining them on a water stone is much easier. It can take double bevel users a little time to learn how a single bevel knife behaves as they tend to rotate towards the flat side when cutting through large objects (melons) so you have to exert torque in the opposite direction to get a straight cut. As far as sharpess is concerned, single bevel knives usually have a more acute angle and therefore a sharper, more delicate edge.

I've only played with a single bevel knife once, a thing of beauty. It's just too fussy a knife for me. And I'm not that fancy of a home cook. I have a few 60 year old French carbon slicers that will do a tomato with the weight of the knife, that's all I really need. And as you mentioned, the character is amazing. I feel like I"m slicing with a touch of Elvis each time. The patina on the wooden handles feels like a soft cloth. For me, I don't have the big money to spend on knives anymore. I can pick up a really gorgeous 10" cooks knife for less than 70 bucks that'll last me the rest of my life. A friend has maybe 6 kramer knives, 1 a cleaver, 1 a slicer and the rest are cooks. You do the math on that one.

DrBiggles wrote:
The knives I like are pre-1987 (major manufacturers went to recycled steel) high-carbon


I really don't think post 1987 knives are an issue. I can buy carbon steel knives labeled "virgin steel" and if this label is true then I am not getting recycled steel. I am confident that when I buy a contemporary knife (virgin or non virgin) the only way it will break is if I misuse it. I actually like post 1987 steel a lot better because of powdered high carbon stainless steel knives that perform as well if not better than regular high carbon steel knives. An example of this would be the Hattori KD series with a Cowry X core:

Yeah, but see we're going back to the Japanese knives. Those don't fall in to the 1987 vortex. It's those pinheads that glut the market with those thick unwieldy German and French knives. Before I was paying attention I bought a Henkels (I use as a garden knife now), a Sabatier (pretty green wood handle) and a new Sabatier Carbon knife. They're heavy, unbalanced nasty things. I bent 1" of the tip on the new carbon steel knife smooshing garlic !!! These same knives 20 years ago were a different breed. And not comparable to today's Japanese knives either. Their skill & technology grows constantly.

http://www.japanesechefsknife.com/KDSeries.html

I would love to see a picture of your pre-1987 knife. A knife that old will have alot of character Smile


The little wall above my board has 3 magnetic knife racks full. It's pretty.

Biggles
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 04, 2005 9:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

DrBiggles wrote:
I can pick up a really gorgeous 10" cooks knife for less than 70 bucks that'll last me the rest of my life.


Where do you recommend looking for such gems?
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DrBiggles



Joined: 12 May 2005
Posts: 355
Location: Richmond, CA

PostPosted: Mon Jun 06, 2005 1:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Anonymous wrote:
DrBiggles wrote:
I can pick up a really gorgeous 10" cooks knife for less than 70 bucks that'll last me the rest of my life.


Where do you recommend looking for such gems?


I found some at garage sales for less than a nickel. Some can be found at local thrift stores for a little more. But most of what I have has been snagged off of Ebay (no secret there). On the pricey side, but he has it all is Ralph1396. He's a 70+ year old guy in Southern CA that has been a knife collector for nearly his entire life. He grew up in Italy and used to regularly travel to Europe for special treats. And over in the States he would buy up stock of closing knife retail outlets. And today? He's selling it all. How many places can you buy a 50 year old New Old Stock 14" German cook's knife? Not many.
Another one I keep after is Savagetrout. He's far less expensive and has some wonderful items. In FACT, I just bought a hand-made knife of unknown origin, maybe 20+ years old, carbon steel. Looked DEAD ON like a Kramer knife, so i bought it. Once of the nicest rigs I have. I'm going to put the sucker in my studio and snap some shots to send to Bob Kramer to see if he knows who made it. It doesn't have his tri-flower dealy on the handle, but he's had many people going through his studio over the years. Could have been one of them.

Biggles
www.meathenge.com
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MisterTupperware



Joined: 09 Jul 2005
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Sat Jul 09, 2005 1:06 pm    Post subject: Tupperware makes great knives too Reply with quote

I use them here at home and have been amazed at how well they keep their edge. They're also guaranteed for life against breaking and guaranteed 100% for a full year against manufacturers' defects.

Multipurpose Shears $45.00

10" Honing Steel $95.00

5" Jumbo Steak Knife Set $160.00

New! Chef Series™ 8 Pc. Set
SAVE $120.00—$445.00 value $325.00

Chef Series™ 9 Pc. Steak Knife Set
SAVE $40.00—$365.00 value $325.00

New! Chef Series™ I want it all set!
SAVE $145.00—$745.00 value $600.00
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 14, 2005 5:37 am    Post subject: Re: Tupperware makes great knives too Reply with quote

MisterTupperware wrote:
I use them here at home and have been amazed at how well they keep their edge. They're also guaranteed for life against breaking and guaranteed 100% for a full year against manufacturers' defects.


From the Tupperware website:

A collection of hand-polished, professional-grade knives crafted of Japanese stainless steel to the exacting standards of European and U.S. chefs

Do you know what grade of steel they use? Judging from the prices (though not always a good measure, especially in the case of the Tojiro DP series) I am assuming it is a low grade. I'm guessing something equivalent to 440A or lower.

I think I'll now take this opportunity to mention the knives that I think are the best bang for the buck:

Tojiro DP Sweden Steel Warikomi(Clad) Series
Wooden Handle


Tojiro’s standard full line series featuring their original DP Clad technology (Technical Pat. #688679). The core cutting edge is high carbon Cobalt Swedish steel sandwiched with 13 Chromium stainless steel. The DP Clad technology made it possible to fully prevent carbon content from being transferred to the layered stainless steel. Thus, it has achieved high hardness of 60-61 Rc., and the Cobalt added Swedish steel with less impurities has a perfect performance in strength and durability, and yet resistant to rust for the outer stainless steel. Water resistant Black Staminawood handle with stainless steel bolster. Available in full models to meet every cutting task.

http://www.japanesechefsknife.com/DPSwdenSteelWoodenHandleSeries.html

Gyuto180mm (7.07") $45.00
Gyuto210mm (8.27") $49.50
Gyuto240mm (9.45") $59.40
Gyuto270mm (10.63") $74.70
Gyuto300mm (11.81) $90.00
Gyuto330mm (12.99") $108.00

If you are interested in superb performance you can move up to the Powdered Steel series. We are talking near carbon (Japanese blue and white steel that is) performance here. I just had one arrive this week and it is amazing. It puts up a really good fight against my hand forged blue steel Gyuto. At half the price it is a steal.

FYI, a Gyuto is the Japanese version of a western chef's knife. It has less belly, little or no bolster and sports a thinner blade.
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liza505
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PostPosted: Wed May 31, 2006 12:17 am    Post subject: my first post on this forum Reply with quote

hi
i'm liza...
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Tom
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 03, 2006 6:51 am    Post subject: Steel Reply with quote

They have been recycling steel from the beginning never mind post 1987. The best tool steels are made of recycled material because there are fewer impurities to refine out since it have already been refined.
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tsunami (alias albino)
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 05, 2006 9:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hallo Knife-freaks :~

BEST OF THE BEST? Teasing

i have got to use a new TOY ^v


Those who were in Solingen at the knife-maker expo, had allready the chance to see and tuch this knife:super:

roman gave it to me to use it and to give him a strait feedback.

thanks to Roman Landes for the joy to use this Yanagiba! Thanks :cool:

The Yanagiba:

300 mm Length (480mm total)
36 mm high (back)
3,6mm thickness (back)

214 gramm total - weight

edge: 10,4° (theoretic angle) 7,54° (inkl. konvex)

The Knife is build with 4-stripes damaststeel (hand-forged by Roman Landes) with a cuttingedge, and grinded in traditional japanese way "kata-ba"

Damaststeel: C60 (0.6% carbon und pure-nickel about 60-80 layers then forged thogeter from four pieces like that (2-outside vertikal - 2-inside horizonal)

Edge-matirial : 1.1545 (it has the same komposit as Shirohami)

Konstruktion = this is a Honyaki (because full High-carbon-steel-construction! the Damast has 60 rockwell the cuttingedge has 64 - 65 rockwell.

Handle:
Moschus-ox horn
Holz: Australian Desert-akazie


here are my Pics (i made it while i was plaing Pool-billard }:| )












Enjoy !
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