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I Love Pressure....

 
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tigress2b



Joined: 15 Oct 2005
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Sat Oct 15, 2005 6:23 pm    Post subject: I Love Pressure.... Reply with quote

Cookers that is. I searched and was surprised that the topic of pressure cookers has not been address in this "ideal" forum. A mechanical engineers dream cooking vessel Cool

So I guess Ill start. I am now the proud owner of 2 - WMF pressure cookers. My MIL introduced me to the concept. Fortunately for me they are idiot proof, won't open until the pressure is completely released. What can I say, Im accident prone. Shock

Anyone else joined in the retro cooking method? Have any recipes to share?

BTW, this is my first post so please be gentle

k Smile
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Michael Lee



Joined: 29 Oct 2005
Posts: 8
Location: Honolulu, HI

PostPosted: Sat Oct 29, 2005 10:56 am    Post subject: Pressure Cooker Reply with quote

I have some familiarity with pressure cookers. What is your experience level? I have a couple of Magafesa cookers after having seen the Cook's Illustrated comparison several years ago. Also a ss Presto tipple top that languishes on a shelf. The new spring valve designs are a lot better. No noise and little loss of steam. Best way to depressurize if you are in a hurry is to put the pot under running water to cool off the steam. Pressure goes down quickly so that the top will release. I have a good pot roast recipe that I originally got from the Presto cook book and modified. 3 lb chuck roast. garlic; 1 package Lipton onion soup mix, 1 onion chopped, 1 cup red wine (original recipe called for 1 1/2 cup water) such as a Cote du Rhone; carrots, potatoes cut to size, bay leaf, other veggies such as celery as desired. Stab both sides of roast with a small knife and invest slices of garlic. Brown roast in vegetable oil. After browning, remove roast and put in a trivet, spacer, or steamer plate from a rice cooker. Put roast back in. Throw in onion soup mix, chopped onion and wine. Seal up the cooker and cook for 45 minutes to 1 hour - longer if you want softer. Interrupt the cooking about 10 minutes before your total cook time to cool the cooker and put in the carrots and potatoes. Seal the cooker again and repressurize for about 8 minutes to cook the veggies. Depressurize. Remove all solids to a plate. Make gravy with flour and water mixture. Season to taste. Serves 5.

By the way, Magafesa makes good cookers. They are from Spain. The US distributor does not carry a full line and the one that was reviewed in Cook's Ill is no longer carried. What a shame. You may have to correspond with Magafesa in Spain to get one. They have several attractive spring valve units and judging by the price that I was able to get, they should be reasonably priced.
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tigress2b



Joined: 15 Oct 2005
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Mon Oct 31, 2005 12:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/...=0&Go.y=0&Go=Go

Thanks for the reply Big smile

Mine are both frm WMF, which is a german based company. They are Big $$$ but well worth it for quality and excellent choice of materials. The heavy bottom provides even cooking and the Stainless makes for VERY easy clean up. The best feature is its idiot proof so youd have to work very hard to make it explode.



As for recipes, they are great for many things. From making stock to soups stews, pork roasts, chicken etc. And much more.

The Aldi stores had one for sale last week, in case anyone is interested in trying one before spending the major $$$'s. Im sure it would work great. and definately is a time and energy saver.

Id gladly share any recipes I have if you want to get your out of moth balls Teasing

karen[/url]
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crawdadmax



Joined: 02 Dec 2005
Posts: 3

PostPosted: Fri Dec 02, 2005 11:18 pm    Post subject: pressure cookers Reply with quote

I love my "Splendid" brand 6 liter pressure cooker. (from Bed bath and beyond-- about 5 years ago-- $40?)

I especially love to use it for old fashioned green beans-- Fry some bacon, use the grease to fry onions and a little garlic. Saute the beans a little before adding water/broth and a hambone. Slap the lid on and cook for about 20-30 minutes. (read the instructions for your particular unit, kids--safety first!) Wonderful results!
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A Kitchen Enthusiast
Guest





PostPosted: Sat Dec 10, 2005 12:49 am    Post subject: Pressure Cooks! Reply with quote

Check out foodnetwork.com. Alton Brown posted a few pressure cooker recipes, including the best pressure-cooked chili I've ever made!

If you're new to the whole pressure-thang, Lorna Sass authored several good cookbooks - the one I have is called "Pressure Perfect". It has several really decent recipes, and lots of generic time tables in the back.

One more thing, http://missvickie.com/index.html
has great tips and some good time tables, and recipes.

I myself use my TFal Speedy Chef Express (Sears on a fluke for $40!) at least once a week. We use it to eat healthier, and for things that would take to long to make otherwise. I make all our chicken broth, brown rice, squashes, baked potatoes, tomato sauce, etc.
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geonuc



Joined: 28 Feb 2006
Posts: 5
Location: Atlanta

PostPosted: Thu Mar 22, 2007 10:52 pm    Post subject: Pressure cookers and glass stovetops Reply with quote

A question came up on another food forum: can pressure cookers be used with glass stovetops?

I don't have a pressure cooker and I'm not sure what pressure they typically operate at, but it's around 30 psia, isn't it? The steam tables have the temperature at saturation as about 250 degF - not that much higher than 212, for which all stovetops are subjected to routinely. I'd say it would take a pretty crappy stovetop not to handle 250.

Am I missing something?
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SirSpice



Joined: 04 Dec 2006
Posts: 95

PostPosted: Thu Mar 22, 2007 11:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have a ~35 year old Aeternum pressure cooker that is one of my absolute favorite cooking pots.

It makes meat so tender it's ridiculous, and it cuts slow-cooking time by at least a half.
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Howard



Joined: 21 Nov 2005
Posts: 64

PostPosted: Fri Mar 23, 2007 1:45 am    Post subject: Re: Pressure cookers and glass stovetops Reply with quote

geonuc wrote:
A question came up on another food forum: can pressure cookers be used with glass stovetops?

I don't have a pressure cooker and I'm not sure what pressure they typically operate at, but it's around 30 psia, isn't it? The steam tables have the temperature at saturation as about 250 degF - not that much higher than 212, for which all stovetops are subjected to routinely. I'd say it would take a pretty crappy stovetop not to handle 250.

Am I missing something?

God forbid somebody try to cook without water on a glass top. Wink
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GaryProtein



Joined: 26 Oct 2005
Posts: 535

PostPosted: Fri Mar 23, 2007 1:46 am    Post subject: Re: Pressure cookers and glass stovetops Reply with quote

geonuc wrote:
A question came up on another food forum: can pressure cookers be used with glass stovetops?

I don't have a pressure cooker and I'm not sure what pressure they typically operate at, but it's around 30 psia, isn't it? The steam tables have the temperature at saturation as about 250 degF - not that much higher than 212, for which all stovetops are subjected to routinely. I'd say it would take a pretty crappy stovetop not to handle 250.

Am I missing something?


Yes, you are. First, a saute pan or a pot being used for deep frying on the stove gets to 350-400F. Second, the Ceran tops made by Schott in Germany can withstand a 700C temperature shock, which is well into the red-hot range. I don't think you cook that at 700C or 1300F, so don't worry.

http://www.us.schott.com/hometech/english/products/ceran/generally/material.html?PHPSESSID=c7ce2c3cc5564bcbd4a5d4fa8b1a128b
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geonuc



Joined: 28 Feb 2006
Posts: 5
Location: Atlanta

PostPosted: Fri Mar 23, 2007 9:37 am    Post subject: Re: Pressure cookers and glass stovetops Reply with quote

Howard wrote:
...God forbid somebody try to cook without water on a glass top. Wink

Sorry, wasn't aware that pressure cookers were used without water.
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GaryProtein



Joined: 26 Oct 2005
Posts: 535

PostPosted: Fri Mar 23, 2007 4:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Pressure cookers are always used with water, unless you are using it topless as a regular pot. The steam when the water boils makes the pressure.
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Auspicious



Joined: 29 Dec 2005
Posts: 60
Location: on the boat, Annapolis, MD

PostPosted: Sat Mar 24, 2007 8:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have a Kuhn Rikon pressure cooker. It's great for all kinds of quick one-pot meals. I second the value of the Miss Vickie recipies.
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SirSpice



Joined: 04 Dec 2006
Posts: 95

PostPosted: Sat Mar 24, 2007 9:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't get why so few people use these, I'm assuming it's because they're afraid of them exploding.
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Howard



Joined: 21 Nov 2005
Posts: 64

PostPosted: Mon Mar 26, 2007 10:15 pm    Post subject: Re: Pressure cookers and glass stovetops Reply with quote

geonuc wrote:
Howard wrote:
...God forbid somebody try to cook without water on a glass top. Wink

Sorry, wasn't aware that pressure cookers were used without water.

What I meant was that if there is any liquid water present, the maximum temperature is limited to the boiling point of the water. Any heat input will not raise the temperature above the boiling point until none of the liquid remains (well, any significant amount, anyway). Therefore, most wet cooking methods will not exceed 100 degrees C (212 F). Cooking with oil can and usually does go above that point though, but nothing over 400F.

However, there are times when there is no water, so you can discount everything I said above. Wink
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