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Choosing a quality knife for husband for Valentines Day....

 
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ksmith
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 08, 2007 4:53 pm    Post subject: Choosing a quality knife for husband for Valentines Day.... Reply with quote

I need help! I want to purchase a quality knife for my husband but I am NO cook and have no idea of what I am getting into.

My price range is about $100 which will cause snickers from the lot of you but this is one item he would like to have but I am clueless.

Please help with any suggestions and where to go to buy them.
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GaryProtein



Joined: 26 Oct 2005
Posts: 535

PostPosted: Thu Feb 08, 2007 8:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Get a 10" chef's knife. It will probably be a bit more, but worth it. Don't get one with a funky handle. Wusthoff classic, Henckels Prof-S, Messenmeister, etc. are all good.
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DrBiggles



Joined: 12 May 2005
Posts: 355
Location: Richmond, CA

PostPosted: Thu Feb 08, 2007 9:50 pm    Post subject: Re: Choosing a quality knife for husband for Valentines Day Reply with quote

ksmith wrote:
I need help! I want to purchase a quality knife for my husband but I am NO cook and have no idea of what I am getting into.

My price range is about $100 which will cause snickers from the lot of you but this is one item he would like to have but I am clueless.

Please help with any suggestions and where to go to buy them.


Depending upon the user, knives can be a really personal thing. Especially if one wants to use it every time over the years. I suggest giving him the money, then attending the hands-on knife trips and make it special and yet he'll get the knife he wants.

Biggles
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Howard



Joined: 21 Nov 2005
Posts: 64

PostPosted: Thu Feb 08, 2007 11:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://knifeforums.com/forums/showforum.php?fid/26/

http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=26036

Don't ignore Chinese cleavers.

http://knifeforums.com/forums/showtopic.php?tid/612586/post/612586/hl//

If he's to be using just one knife, I would suggest a Chinese cleaver. They aren't the big thick things for smashing bones - those would be meat cleavers - but rather thin general-purpose knives, just like chef's knives.
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IndyRob



Joined: 17 Dec 2006
Posts: 77

PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2007 11:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I agree with DrBiggles, but presents in boxes are often more fun than presents in envelopes. If you know him, you may be able to succeed with your own purchase.

In my case, I'd only just decided this year that I was worthy of decent knives. While dropping hints before Christmas, I specifically said "Not too expensive - I probably won't take care of a really fine knife as well as it should be." (although I've done okay so far)

My son bought me a Kitchen Aid santoku. Not top of the line, but quite sharp and nice to use. I used a check from an in-law to buy a $40 Henckels chef's knife. Then my wife bought me one very similar.

If I could substitute one of the chefs knives for a paring knife, I would've felt I'd done very well indeed (not that I'm disappointed by any means).

If he's like me, three decent knives might have a bigger bang for the buck than one good one. Plus, he gets to try a new knife three times instead of only once.

But if he already has a few decent knives, then maybe he'd appreciate the singular "Magic Blade o' Universal Admiration" much more.
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SirSpice



Joined: 04 Dec 2006
Posts: 95

PostPosted: Sat Feb 10, 2007 5:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would definetely suggest you buy one good knife over 3 inferior ones.

I have a Global 8" and a Tojiro DP 12" as my quality knives. I also have a 7" Hencke's Santuko which is pretty nice, but a bit soft.

I would definetely recommend the Tojiro DP line

For $50 you can get a beautiful 8" cladded (carbon sandwitched in stainless) gyuto that will beat out just about anything in it's price range, and still have enough to add a petty (utility knife) in there. It's shipped straight from Japan (suprisingly quickly), and they will gift wrap it for 1 cent.

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DanB
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 12, 2007 10:00 pm    Post subject: Tojiro DP Reply with quote

I just ordered the Tojiro DP gyuto, which does indeed look beautiful. Can I ask how you sharpen/hone it? I've heard it's relatively easy. Would appreciate hearing your suggestions
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SirSpice



Joined: 04 Dec 2006
Posts: 95

PostPosted: Mon Feb 12, 2007 11:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I use a King #1000/#6000 Grit Waterstone on my knives and hone them no a ceramic steel, although lately I've been using a leather strop I made (it's pretty cheesy, a belt ducktaped to a piece of cardboard). I use the instructions from JapaneseChefKnives.

I haven't sharpened mine yet, but I have used the waterstone and technique on my Global 8" and it works great. If you've severly chipped your blade you might need a smaller grit, but otherwise the medium/veryfine combination puts a beautiful edge.
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DanB
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 2007 12:07 am    Post subject: Sharpening Globals Reply with quote

I also have a Global G-2. I've been sharpening it with the Shinkansen Mino-sharp ceramic wheel device Global recommends. Puts a very nice edge on the blade. I take it you wouldn't recommend that with the Tojiro?
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SirSpice



Joined: 04 Dec 2006
Posts: 95

PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 2007 1:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I like using the waterstone because it gives you full control, whether thats a good or bad thing is up to you. If you like the edge it gives your Global, than by all means use it on the Tojiro.

The various sharpening devices work well for touchups, but to get a really great highly polished edge it's worth the money and effort to learn to use a waterstone.
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DanB



Joined: 13 Feb 2007
Posts: 7

PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 2007 2:45 am    Post subject: sharpening guides? Reply with quote

You're almost certainly right; it's time for me to upgrade my sharpening system. Do you recommend any guides like the clip on ones Global sells to use with waterstones, or is it best to practice freehand?
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SirSpice



Joined: 04 Dec 2006
Posts: 95

PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 2007 4:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would practice on a cheap knife. Get a protractor so you can get a grasp of the angles though. I'm by no means an experienced sharpener, if you really want great advice look for it on www.knifeforums.com .

I would highly suggest you read this entire article before sharpening your knives. It goes into great detail to explain everything you need to sharpen well. It also lists some sharpening systems that set the angles for you like the Spyderco system.
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pj_rage



Joined: 07 Feb 2007
Posts: 15

PostPosted: Fri Feb 16, 2007 8:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've been using the spyderco sharpening kit and that baby gets them SHARP! Can easily take even a cheap knife to a razor sharp edge that glides through paper.

I really don't have any basis for comparison, but I do know I can take my cheapo knives and my good ones and make them sharper than any knives I've ever felt, so I'm not in the market for a new sharpening system yet.

And it is really easy too!
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