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Recipe File: Shepherd's Pie (Cottage Pie)
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 01, 2006 7:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Since the potatoes are already mashed and warm, and the meat and vegetable portion of the dish are already fully cooked, and still hot from the range top, what do you lose by not simply broiling the dish for a few minutes, instead of a 400 oven for thirty minutes? It seems to me that you could save some time doing that, as well as perhaps saving some moisture in the lower strata of potatoes by not exposing it to the heat for so long.

Otherwise a nice recipe, and as this is my first comment, let me congratulate you on an excellent website. If this website did not exist, mankind would be driven to create it.
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Yasmin
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 02, 2006 6:35 am    Post subject: Shepherd's pie Reply with quote

I second the comment a while back about the ground lamb rather than beef...I 've done mine with either lamb or a mixture of lamb and beef. Then again, I am partial to that "lamby" flavor that some folks aren't into...

Great site, by the way. Very fresh among food blogs. I've been tracking them for ThisNext.com, and yours is really inventive. Looking forward to the next recipe...
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Liz
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 25, 2006 10:16 pm    Post subject: A bit of a twist Reply with quote

Great website. I added 1/4 cup very dry sherry to the mixture while it was still cooking. It added a nutty flavor. I also used pork, as that was what was leftover.
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stinglighter
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 12, 2006 3:03 am    Post subject: sheppie Reply with quote

I agree with the worschester sauce addition into the gravy...it brings out more flavor, along with 2-3 tbsp tomato paste. I also add a layer of cheddar to the top that melts down onto the potatoes.
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stanlees@guamcell.net
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 31, 2006 11:08 pm    Post subject: shepherds pie Reply with quote

Almost Perfect but important you forgot Layer green peas under Potatoes about 1/2 -3/4 inch Thick Stanley
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Guest






PostPosted: Fri Aug 18, 2006 2:59 pm    Post subject: Delicious! Reply with quote

I have really enjoyed your website - thank you! We had this for dinner a week or so ago. It was enjoyable to prepare and even more enjoyable to eat. The family decided they would like it with more meat, so I'll probably add another 1/2 pound of ground meat next time. (sorry if that's improper in Britain, but we like our meat!)

I did use someone's recommendation and set it under the broiler instead of baking it. I prepared the potatoes after the meat mixture, so they were still warm. Broiled it a few minutes until the top was golden, then sprinkled a touch of sharp cheddar and returned to the turned off, but still warm oven to let it melt. This is exactly how my husband likes it, so he was thrilled.

Thanks again for a wonderful site, I have tried 4 recipes here already and they have all been a big hit with the family. Thank you, Michael!!
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Diane



Joined: 27 Aug 2006
Posts: 2
Location: US southwest

PostPosted: Sun Aug 27, 2006 5:18 pm    Post subject: Variations on shepherds pie Reply with quote

A recipe from Sunset magazine that I found sveral years ago was a nice variation on the traditional.

They added sweet potatoes to the mashed potato topping ( aboout 50/50 red garnet sweet potatoes / russett potatoes).

The meat filling was the same ground lamb and veggies, but spiced with a mild curry.

IMHO a very tasty change of pace.
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jabar
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 25, 2006 6:56 pm    Post subject: Shepherd's pie Reply with quote

Great recipe for shepherd's pie or cottage pie, depending on the ingredients! Thanks.

I tried a variation that others might like to experiment with. I used country sausage (pork sausage w/a light onion/garlic flavor and minimal sage) in lieu of the beef/lamb. Instead of beef stock for gravy I used some excellent turkey stock made with herbs d'provence. The stock is a little stronger that chicken stock and not as heavily flavored as beef stock. The results were very good. I also added the layer of peas.

jb
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jasra
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 02, 2006 2:59 am    Post subject: How many pounds of potatoes? Reply with quote

In your spiffy charts, you show 1.5 lbs of potatoes for the mashed potatoes section. In the assembly chart, you show 1.75 lbs. I just wanted to ask where the extra .25 lbs of potatoes snuck in from.
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1622
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Sat Dec 02, 2006 7:41 pm    Post subject: Re: How many pounds of potatoes? Reply with quote

jasra wrote:
In your spiffy charts, you show 1.5 lbs of potatoes for the mashed potatoes section. In the assembly chart, you show 1.75 lbs. I just wanted to ask where the extra .25 lbs of potatoes snuck in from.

Extra water cooked into and then mashed into the potatoes makes mashed potatoes weigh more than the starting potatoes.
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PostPosted: Wed Dec 06, 2006 9:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello chaps - London calling...

I would concur with both the Worcester sauce and tomato puree additions, but only when using lamb. If you are using beef, then it has to be Marmite.

As for the potatoes, I've achieved my best results by steaming them, then mashing with a positively indecent amount of unsalted butter and a little double cream. Season with a good sea salt and white pepper.

In our household, peas are usually served separately.

As an aside, the devil's vegetable (sweetcorn) should only ever be eaten on the cob, in tuna sandwiches or in a smoked fish chowder.
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a Joy of Cooking user
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 18, 2007 2:50 am    Post subject: shepherd's pie Reply with quote

Since this recipe is taken directly from the Joy of Cooking (and the recipe description is copied verbatim), I think it would be good practice to credit the publication. The presentation is unique, but obviously people think that this is your recipe.
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1622
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Thu Jan 18, 2007 5:31 pm    Post subject: Re: shepherd's pie Reply with quote

a Joy of Cooking user wrote:
Since this recipe is taken directly from the Joy of Cooking (and the recipe description is copied verbatim), I think it would be good practice to credit the publication. The presentation is unique, but obviously people think that this is your recipe.

Oh, nice. I when I wrote this I did it from note cards and didn't know if I had gotten it handed down through friends or from a cookbook. Even the presentation notes are the same - fluffing the potatoes in a baking dish. Only thing that got added over the years appararently, was the paprika. Interesting, how some recipes evolve quickly, and some just stay the same as they change hands. I've added a credit statement at the beginning of the article.
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PostPosted: Sat Jan 27, 2007 10:05 am    Post subject: rosemary and thyme? Reply with quote

are the rosemary and thyme necessary for this recipe?
are there any other cheaper or more common substitutes? for example..garlic salt? haha..thanks Smile
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Guest





PostPosted: Tue Feb 06, 2007 11:38 pm    Post subject: Cottage Pie Reply with quote

Just tried the pie -- fabulous! Had some leftover gravy from a pot roast that I used instead of beef broth, added chopped fresh parsley (about 1/2 a bunch) in with the ground beef, and a few splashes of sherry right at the end. Put plenty of butter in the potatoes and used milk instead of potato water - I used unpeeled red potatos, like I always do - saves on peeling them and then there's all the nutrition in the peels not thrown away. I like to add parsley to most dishes - gives you an inexpensive and easy way to add that dark leafy green veg. we all need without adding any discernible flavor - go ahead & use the edible stems and just chop very fine before adding.

A little trick for making sure your boiled potatoes are completely dry before mashing them: After draining, return the potatoes to the stove and dry-cook for a few minutes - this ensures there's no extra water left in the pot which can make them taste -- watery of course! Then mash in your butter thoroughly before adding the milk. This way each particle of potato is encapsulated in butter before adding the milk. Make sure you use enough salt & pepper and you'll end up with creamy, buttery potatos.

This is for the person wanting a cheap source for rosemary & thyme: Instead of buying the expensive brands in the spice section, look for the Hispanic spice display, which is usually close to the regular spices or in the Hispanic food section. You'll find most of your common spices at a much cheaper price - around $1.00 for a 4 to 6 oz. bag of thyme, bay leaves, rosemary, black pepper, etc.
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