Cooking For Engineers Forum Index Cooking For Engineers
Analytical cooking discussed.
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Recipe File: Grilled Porterhouse or T-Bone Steak
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Cooking For Engineers Forum Index -> Comments Forum
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Stonee
Guest





PostPosted: Tue May 16, 2006 5:08 pm    Post subject: Steak Grilling Reply with quote

I've got to say something here. Both Epicurious and Cooks Illustrated both agree that constant flipping is a GOOD THING; as in every 30 seconds. It keeps the meat at a more constant temperature. The thought of only one or two flips is another ubran legend. All that's going to do is dry out the meat on the outside of the steak until the inside gets to a high enough temp.
Back to top
maagnus
Guest





PostPosted: Fri May 19, 2006 2:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Try this before you say no.
Cavenders Greek sesoning is great, I use it on all my meats,save fish.
Mushrooms fresh,cut , broiled in butter as you say are very tasty, try adding beef bullion granules and garic at the begining then don't add cream, but after the moisture is out of the mushrooms UNCOVER them ,reduce heat and let the "sauce" reduce to a "glaze", don't burn them!
Leave your steak out to come up to near room temp and you can reduce cooking time or more easly get medium or better doneness.
Now I now you will flince, but to get it more done, off the grill put it in the microwave and nuke at NO MORE THAN 60% POWER and WACTH your time!Or you WILL ruin your steak. Try these and use the ones you like.
My guests never know "I NUKED their steaks"!
Back to top
Guest






PostPosted: Sun May 28, 2006 4:25 pm    Post subject: Thanks Michael Reply with quote

Wow, I didn't expect a long informitive article in response to my question. Thanks a lot for taking the time to answer! It's appreciated, and sounds quite helpful.

Emily
Back to top
Tony
Guest





PostPosted: Wed Jun 14, 2006 8:06 am    Post subject: Porterhouse steak Reply with quote

Where does the name Porterhouse come from? Is this steak named after someone in history?
Back to top
Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1617
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Wed Jun 14, 2006 6:07 pm    Post subject: Re: Porterhouse steak Reply with quote

Tony wrote:
Where does the name Porterhouse come from? Is this steak named after someone in history?

I don't know, but it may have picked up it's name from the old porterhouses (like a bar & grill). Perhaps a particular porterhouse served it as their Porterhouse special and the name stuck? (Like the Delmonico steak named after the restaurant which undoubtedly served more than a single cut of beef for steaks... the weird thing is that the Delmonico is a different cut depending on what reagion you're in.)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
bennett
Guest





PostPosted: Fri Oct 13, 2006 9:00 pm    Post subject: what oven temp is equivalent to grill 'low heat'? Reply with quote

I'm using a propane grill to cook the steaks, which doesn't have a 'low heat' area. If I finish cooking the steaks to 130 degrees internal temp by using my oven, what temp would you recommend setting the oven to? Also I assume I can use the Bake setting instead of Broil since by that point I don't care about browning the outsides.
Back to top
Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1617
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Fri Oct 13, 2006 11:51 pm    Post subject: Re: what oven temp is equivalent to grill 'low heat'? Reply with quote

bennett wrote:
I'm using a propane grill to cook the steaks, which doesn't have a 'low heat' area. If I finish cooking the steaks to 130 degrees internal temp by using my oven, what temp would you recommend setting the oven to? Also I assume I can use the Bake setting instead of Broil since by that point I don't care about browning the outsides.

Is there no way to turn down the heat on your grill? If not, then transferring to the oven may be the best course of action. Preheat the oven to about 300°F and then when you're done searing the meat, measure it's internal temperature bofer placing it on a sheet pan (or some other heat proof container). I can't really give you guidelines here because it all depends on your oven and how thick you get your porterhouse cuts. But if you've got quite a ways to go (steak is at 90°F) leave it in the oven fore ten mintues and check again. After you cook two steaks this way, you'll get a good feel for how long you'll need to keep it in your oven.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
socal_chris



Joined: 02 Oct 2006
Posts: 49
Location: Southern CA

PostPosted: Sun Oct 15, 2006 3:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great post...I'm a huge fan of T-bones on the grill also...but nothing beats a great top sirloin IMO.

I've gone down many paths of marinades and seasonings and for this type of cut, I always come back to one standard.
Seasoning Salt (Lowry's or McCormick if possible)
Worceschire Powder (or Powdered Worceschire Sauce..I've found a few brands) - this works great since I've found that the fat and liquid in a good steak prevents actual Worceshire sauce from really penetrating the steak, and when grilled, the juices that are forced out of the meat wash away that great flavor. The powder sticks and cooks on with the seasoned salt. That's all a great steak needs.

Now for marinades...Michael needs to do a good Grilled London Broil thread! There's a real grilling challenge! Smile
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Yahoo Messenger
GaryProtein



Joined: 26 Oct 2005
Posts: 535

PostPosted: Sun Oct 15, 2006 4:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Alton Brown made a very good case for SLOWLY cooking the steak over a low-moderate heat until the interior temperature was a somewhat less than the desired final temperature, THEN quickly searing the outside to form a crust, followed by a rest period before serving. The contention is that this prevents the meat from drying out or splattering over high heat in the beginning causing flare-ups at a time when most of the cooking is still to be done. I tried this and it works.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
socal_chris



Joined: 02 Oct 2006
Posts: 49
Location: Southern CA

PostPosted: Sun Oct 15, 2006 8:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

GaryProtein wrote:
Alton Brown made a very good case for SLOWLY cooking the steak over a low-moderate heat until the interior temperature was a somewhat less than the desired final temperature, THEN quickly searing the outside to form a crust, followed by a rest period before serving. The contention is that this prevents the meat from drying out or splattering over high heat in the beginning causing flare-ups at a time when most of the cooking is still to be done. I tried this and it works.

I remember that episode I think. I've always seared them over the coals and then move them off the heat to finish to doneness, and never had a dry steak. I eat mine rare and the wife likes med. rare though. Never cook anything well done. In fact, even when I make a pork tenderloin roast, my thermometers say 170* and I usually only go to about 155* and let it rest for 5-10 min. Maybe hits 160* tops. Always delicious and jucy!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Yahoo Messenger
mochili
Guest





PostPosted: Fri Oct 20, 2006 2:36 am    Post subject: porterhouse steaks Reply with quote

i only use charcoal / propane is not hot enough
build a big fire until the wire rack glows red
put the steaks on 2 minutes each side / no salt no pepper
take off the fire / let them rest 5 minutes and dig in
the mushroom sauce sounds good on pizza
don't forget a big mug of beer (Sam Adams)
boyaaa!
Back to top
socal_chris



Joined: 02 Oct 2006
Posts: 49
Location: Southern CA

PostPosted: Fri Oct 20, 2006 3:02 am    Post subject: to sautee a shroom... Reply with quote

So...this post inspired me to sautee some mushrooms for a little steak grilling with my neighbors the other day.

I took some pre-sliced mushrooms that i picked up at my local Stater Bros. market. I poured about a 1/2 cup of red wine vinegar and 1/4 cup of balsamic vinegar in a bowl, added about 1 tbsp of McCormicks steak seasoning and about 2 cups of the sliced raw mushrooms. I let them soak in the mix for about an hour. I put about 2-3 tbsp of EVOO in a frying pan on high heat, drained the mushrooms and put them in the hot oil. Saute'd until brown and carmelized. They came out awesome!!!! They had a sweet and savory flavor with the balsamic reduction and the steak seasoning. Put them out in a serving dish with a cup of crumbled bleu cheese for topping some sirloins.

Rave reviews!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Yahoo Messenger
GaryProtein



Joined: 26 Oct 2005
Posts: 535

PostPosted: Fri Oct 20, 2006 8:06 am    Post subject: Re: porterhouse steaks Reply with quote

mochili wrote:
i only use charcoal / propane is not hot enough
build a big fire until the wire rack glows red
put the steaks on 2 minutes each side / no salt no pepper
take off the fire / let them rest 5 minutes and dig in
the mushroom sauce sounds good on pizza
don't forget a big mug of beer (Sam Adams)
boyaaa!


Pffffff!! Propane not hot enough? If your grill doesn't get hot enough, make like an engineer and take out the valve and drill the gas orifice a little larger to get more gas into the fire. Then re-install. If you are leary about this, you can buy an extra set of orifices before you drill if you are concerned about the results. You can also try it out on only one burner until you see the results. Replacement orifices cost only a few dollars apiece and are available at any good propane store. It helps to have a number drill set (#1-60) and just experiment enlarging the holes until you have the inferno you desire. Enlarge the hole one drill size at a time and test it. Using fractional size drills is not recommended because the graduations between sizes is too great. Your burner may wear out faster, but it's worth it! Let the orifice be the limiting factor for the high setting and the valve will be the limiting factor for the low setting. You'll be amazed how well your grill will cook.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
bennett
Guest





PostPosted: Sat Oct 21, 2006 9:08 pm    Post subject: can't get smooth brown on the outside and pink on the inside Reply with quote

Of all the methods I've tried -- propane gas grill, pan-frying, using a George Foreman grill, and broiling inside the oven -- I can't get the steaks to come out with a smooth dark brown crust on the outside while remaining pink on the inside. No matter how I cook them, by the time the outside gets dark brown, the insides are usually cooked well done. I've ordered steaks to go from the Keg and brought them back to see how they look compared to the ones I'm making, and I can clearly see the difference, I just don't know how to get mine to look like theirs. (At that point I usually eat my homemade steak anyway, and then eat the Keg one for dessert.)

I know the way the Keg gets theirs to come out perfectly is using a flame broiler, but presumably there are no home versions of those.

I saw the post about taking a drill to your propane grill. That's a little bit hardcore for me. I get lost just trying to follow Rachael Ray on TV.

The only practical home option that I haven't tried is the charcoal grill. I've heard those produce a better heat for searing. But doesn't it take a lot of time and preparation to get a charcoal fire going -- a lot just for one steak for myself for dinner? And in any case I'm hoping to avoid buying any more big equipment until I've ruled everything else out.

So, what's the most common troubleshooting tip for people who can't get their steaks to come out dark brown crusted on the outside and pink on the inside?
Back to top
Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1617
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Sat Oct 21, 2006 11:35 pm    Post subject: Re: can't get smooth brown on the outside and pink on the in Reply with quote

bennett wrote:
So, what's the most common troubleshooting tip for people who can't get their steaks to come out dark brown crusted on the outside and pink on the inside?

The key is to get really high heat onto the surface of the steak so that the time ti takes to brown it is minimized. If your propane grill, broiler, and electric grill aren't doing it, then use the good old cast iron pan. If you don't have one, you should be able to pick one of for $10. Put it on high heat and let it get really hot. Slap the steak on and don't touch it for at least three minutes. Flip it over and see if you've got the brown sear you're looking for. If not, then you'll have to leave it on longer on each side - which means, you probably can't get high enough heat to not end up cooking your steaks to well-done. The solution at that point? The easiest is just to buy thicker steaks - 2-in. steaks are wonderful to cook with and result in delicious crusts with ample medium-rare flesh. 3-in. is even better, but you'll probably want someone to share that with. Smile

Also, you might want to try brushing on some melted butter before grilling or searing the steaks. It adds a nice flavor and promotes browning.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Cooking For Engineers Forum Index -> Comments Forum All times are GMT
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8  Next
Page 3 of 8

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You can reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You can delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group