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Recipe File: Buttercream Frosting (American)
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PostPosted: Sun May 14, 2006 8:22 pm    Post subject: A variation? Reply with quote

My grandma had a recipe for frosting that I absolutely adored, and have since lost. It probably doesn't qualify as buttercream, but I thought I'd ask here anyway. The base was milk and flour, cooked together until creamy. Then you beat sugar and butter for about 10 minutes, until the sugar was incorporated into the butter. Add the cooled milk mixture and beat again. I recall that you could add vanilla, jam or cocoa as well to flavor it.

It made a really light, delicate icing, but without the worry about salmonella. Has anyone heard of something similar? I've wanted to make it again but haven't found a similar recipe.
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Shalmanese



Joined: 19 Jul 2005
Posts: 7

PostPosted: Mon May 15, 2006 2:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

"The Professional Pastry Chef" by Bo Friberg lists French Buttercream (p477) as containing 12 egg yolks and no egg whites
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Bride to Be
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PostPosted: Thu May 18, 2006 4:54 am    Post subject: Danish Buttercream??? Reply with quote

Can anybody tell me the difference between "Classic Buttercream" and "Danish Buttercream," in terms of wedding cakes? I have a culinary background (trained at a culinary school, worked in catering for awhile), but it has been over 15 years since I left the field. I am familiar with Italian, Swiss, and French buttercreams, but I have never heard of Danish.

I am getting married this summer and have to pick out 4 cake samples (I get to choose the cake, fillings, and icings for each) to try out at my cake tasting appointment. The bakery offers (among 9 different icing choices) both "Classic Buttercream" and "Danish Buttercream." I've already decided to try the Rolled Fondant and the Marizapan (my top 2 choices), but I am now trying to decide if it is worthwhile trying both the buttercream options.
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Janka
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PostPosted: Thu May 18, 2006 3:20 pm    Post subject: forsting using butter and pudding Reply with quote

Quote:
The base was milk and flour, cooked together until creamy. Then you beat sugar and butter for about 10 minutes, until the sugar was incorporated into the butter. Add the cooled milk mixture and beat again.


My familiy uses this kind of filling. However, I don't have the family recipe on hand. We use vanilla pudding powder.
2 cups milk
2 packages vanilla pudding powder (one package calling for 2 cups milk, so you get a thick custard)
- cook until thick, let cool completely
1 cup butter
5-6 oz sugar
- beat the butter and the sugar, then add the custard SLOWLY, until everything combines. The custard must be cold.
Note: I did not try this recipe myself. You can add cocoa or vanilla flavor (if not using vanilla pudding). You'll need to adjust the amounts if using preserves or nuts, I suppose. Corn starch can also be used (see package for amounts).
This spreads very well, and is not as "heavy" as only butter+sugar frosting.
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shirewoman2
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PostPosted: Thu May 18, 2006 6:00 pm    Post subject: Buttercream Reply with quote

Two things:
1. Spacial K -- chill out. No one like a know-it-all, and no one especially likes an angry know-it-all.

2. In regards to the earlier post about buttercream being made with confectioners' sugar and butter, yes, I've seen that in a lot of places, too, but I get the impression that this is more like the quick version, sort of a pseudo-buttercream. Try the recipe with the eggs -- it's FABULOUS! It's more time-consuming to prepare, but it is a thousand-fold (or 1E03 for you engineers ;-D ) better than the version using confectioners' sugar. The confectioners' sugar version does have a couple of advantages, though, so don't completely forget about it. It takes less time to make, and as it sits, it dries out a bit, making the frosting kind of hard, which is nice for decorating. I like it for decorating cookies. Buttercream made with eggs is a little more heat sensitive and gets a bit droopy when it sits out.

Thanks for the great blog!!!
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Buttercream Lover
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PostPosted: Fri May 19, 2006 8:40 pm    Post subject: Buttercream Blues Reply with quote

I had a similar problem with buttercream "weeping" and it was solved by warming it slightly. I tried the recommended towel-soaked-in-hot-water-and-wrung-out wrapped around the bowl of the standing mixer. That didn't quite do the trick so I scraped the butterceam into a bowl and microwaved it on low for about a minute (pausing to scrape and stir), and then put it back into the mixer and it came right together after a bit of beating. Strangely enough, this happened to me in winter when my house was particularly cold, as well as in warmer weather. I guess it has to do with the butter's temperature relative to the egg mixture...? In any case, if it does that weird curdly thing, try warming it gently and beating again.
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pdx cook
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PostPosted: Sat May 20, 2006 6:42 pm    Post subject: frosting made w/ flour & milk Reply with quote

thank you anonymous poster for mentioning your grandmother's frosting made w/ a flour and milk base. i'd never heard of such a recipe before, but was really intrigued after reading your post, so i did a little research and found a recipe that seemed like a match. i made it last night (adding 1/4c of natural cocoa) and loved it! i'd highly recommend giving it a try for anyone who's game for something a little different, and isn't a foodie purist. it's very light and just a little custard-y. here's the recipe i found:

INGREDIENTS:
2 tablespoons flour
3/4 cup milk
3/4 cup butter
3/4 cup sugar
1/8 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon vanilla
PREPARATION:
In a saucepan add a small amount of the milk to flour then stir to make a smooth paste. Add remaining milk. Cook, stirring constantly, over medium heat until mixture boils and thickens. Cool.
Cream butter using medium speed of electric mixer.
Gradually add sugar and salt; beat well. Add cooled milk mixture. Beat until light and fluffy; add vanilla. Frosts a two layer cake.
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pdx cook
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PostPosted: Sat May 20, 2006 9:56 pm    Post subject: clarification Reply with quote

those question marks which proceed the quantities are unintentional - i think they started out as bullets... sorry for any confusion.
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PostPosted: Sun May 21, 2006 8:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great recipe but I actually recommend that you add the vanilla after you beat the egg because the extract has a chance of evaporating when heated.
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PostPosted: Tue May 23, 2006 7:26 pm    Post subject: How long does butter cream keep in the fridge? Reply with quote

It'd be nice if I could prepare it well before I needed it.
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1622
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Tue May 23, 2006 8:38 pm    Post subject: Re: How long does butter cream keep in the fridge? Reply with quote

Anonymous wrote:
It'd be nice if I could prepare it well before I needed it.

You should be able to refrigerate it for at least a week. Just make sure you provide enough time for it to return to room temperature.
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Tiamat
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PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2006 8:13 pm    Post subject: Salmonella fears Reply with quote

Just thought I'd mention that you can buy pasturized eggs. Also, the odds of a typical American getting salmonella from raw eggs is something like 1 in 10,000. I've always eaten raw eggs (in cookie dough and cake batters, usually) and never had any problems.
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kayke
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PostPosted: Sat May 27, 2006 2:06 am    Post subject: buttercream Reply with quote

When I worked as a pastry chef at a national natural foods grocery store (Whole Paycheck) we would "re-liven" the BC by putting it into the kitchenaid with the paddle, start the mixer, and then heat the bottom of the bowl with a torch (available at your local hardware store; not necessary to drop major buxx on a "professional" one) and it always came together well. Then you can add melted bittersweet chocolate or other flavorings. Just make sure not to concentrate the flame on one part of the bowl for too long; I find a sweeping motion over the bottom of the bowl works well.
Thanks for a really cool site! I'm adding it to my bookmarks.
K.
--for the record, I never went to culinary school, but instead learned it all from my mom/granparents/great-grandparents who owned bakeries. And our buttercream was always made with egg yolks.
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Caitlin
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PostPosted: Mon May 29, 2006 3:41 pm    Post subject: Chocolate Buttercream Reply with quote

I would like to try this recipe as a chocolate buttercream frosting. Would I use powdered cocoa or melted cocoa? Would I need to add the cocoa before I heat the mixture or when I'm adding the butter?
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Amy
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 06, 2006 1:58 am    Post subject: Buttercream w/egg yolk Reply with quote

I used to have a recipe for ginger sandwich cookies (I think it was from an old Williams-Sonoma catalogue years back) with a lemon cream frosting--as I recall, it was your standard buttercream made with butter and powdered sugar, but with an egg yolk, along with some lemon zest. No extra liquid of any sort, and not cooked. I wish I could find that recipe again--it was pretty tasty.

I remember also reading somewhere that to get rid of some of the "cornstarch" taste in that type of frosting to stir it over some simmering water (using double boiler) for a couple of minutes--now you can just microwave it a bit to do the same thing, then let cool and rewhip.

Would microwaving the above raw egg frosting (after making it, of course), kill off the salmonella, and then you could just rewhip it?
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