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Searing after cooking

 
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 22, 2006 2:26 am    Post subject: Searing after cooking Reply with quote

So I was watching an episode of Good Eats on Food Network and the theme was dispelling common food myths. The one that really surpised me was when he tested whether searing meat actually "seals in the juices" and keeps it juicier. The result was that a seared steak actually lost more moisture than the unseared steak.

Now, I know searing adds a lot of flavor, and was interested in maybe cooking a steak in the oven first and then throwing it on a screaming hot pan to sear. Less moisture would escape during the oven cooking part and then the browning from the sear would add the flavor. Anyone try this?
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ktexp2



Joined: 03 Nov 2005
Posts: 34

PostPosted: Mon Jan 23, 2006 2:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

On a few occasions when I made steak, I grilled it first then when it was almost done, brought it inside to finish in a hot skillet with onions. My boyfriend thinks its delicious. I don't eat steak so I wouldn't know!
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1619
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Mon Jan 23, 2006 8:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I usually sear the steak before I slip it in the oven to finish / keep warm, so I can use the fond (brown bits left in pan from searing) as a basis for my sauce. Since I take my steaks (generally) medium rare, I don't usually end up with a juiciness problem - unless I've screwed up and over cooked it.
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cynicalb



Joined: 12 May 2005
Posts: 33

PostPosted: Wed Jan 25, 2006 5:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

"On Food and Cooking" by Harold McGee explains what happens in searing and I've seen Alton's show and he gives basically the same explanation (many times on Alton's scientific themed episodes I think that all he does is present McGee's topics and explanations in a TV format). Simply, all that is happening is that the meat surface is carmelizing. This creates compounds that are quite tasty. Now, regarding cooking first and then searing - I would think that doing this would not necessarily be better than just searing or searing and finishing in an oven. I would be concerned about overcooking the steak. Normally when a steak is seared - unless it is exceptionally thick - the searing alone will get it to medium rare (personal note - cooking any steak beyond medium rare is a no-no). I have had the best success grilling over a hardwood charcoal fire. You can get a fire that is ridiculously hot - have the coals on one side of the grill. Sear the steak - should take 5 minutes or so a side - then move the steak to the other side of the grill to finish. Total time for a 2" thick rib eye is about 15 minutes or so (assuming the steak is at room temperature to start). Let the steak rest for 5 minutes or so and dig in.

Now, when you make a standing rib roast - which is nothing more than a bone-in rib eye roast - you cook it in a very hot - 450F - oven. this basically sears the surface and then cooks it the reat of the way. So, you might be able to accomplish the same thing in the oven, ala your question, but I would only do it with a thick piece of meat.
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FranksPlace2



Joined: 08 Aug 2005
Posts: 16

PostPosted: Sat Feb 04, 2006 10:02 pm    Post subject: The Fallacy Reply with quote

There is a great cookbook called Cookwise by Shirley Corriher that explains the hows and whys of cooking. The fallacy here is that searing "seals" the meat. You may form a crust but the crust leaks. Think about the juices that come out on the steak platter.

There is good flavor in the crust but the better way to achieve it is to raise the temperature at the end of cooking. This will brown the proteins and sugars that have come out of the meat.

Frank
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atay04



Joined: 05 Jan 2010
Posts: 1
Location: Littel Rock, Arkansas

PostPosted: Tue Jan 05, 2010 7:56 pm    Post subject: Sear and then cook Reply with quote

Hello All! I have purchased 6 ribeye steaks. Total weight is 5.36 lbs. I was told (which I normally do this...) to rub in olive oil, a little worchestershire and top with greek seasoning. After this, I am to pan sear and then put in 500 degree oven til done. If I would like medium steaks as an end result, how long do i cook this amount of meat in a 500 degree oven? I have in the past, not seared first, but rather, just put in 500 degree oven (for beef tenderloin), baked 8 minutes per pound and then turned off the oven for 3 hours and have had WONDERFUL results. Suggestions?
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 999
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Tue Jan 05, 2010 9:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

seems everything is pretty much 'on track' except the oven temp - that needs a little explaining....

restaurants use very hot ovens to finish things. that's because hungry patrons are not always so patience. keep in mind, they do it hundreds of times - they are quite expert at fast-high-temp cooking.

finishing a steak at 500'F is of course possible - but timing is _everything_ - too long and it's toast.

a lower temp oven will give you a bit more leeway in getting a good result.

do you have a thermometer to check the internal temp?
'cooking by the clock' is very tricky - using a thermometer to check the actual internal temp is much more reliable.

6 steaks, 5 pounds, sounds like less than 1" thickness...?
the thinner the steak, the faster it goes to overdone and tough.

searing is good, searing makes tasty. so season, sear in a blazing hot pan. hot as your burner will go - do _not_ use non-stick cookware for this task.

after a 2-3 minute sear per side perhaps 10 minutes in a 375'F oven with a (covered) 10 minute rest period.

if you've got a thermometer, go for 125-128'F in the middle of the thickness, then pull and let rest.

no thermometer, poke the steak with your finger - it should still feel a bit "mushy" in the middle - you don't want the steak to feel firm/hard to the touch/poke - that's overdone and really hard to un-cook . . .

good luck!
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DrBiggles



Joined: 12 May 2005
Posts: 355
Location: Richmond, CA

PostPosted: Wed Jan 06, 2010 5:43 pm    Post subject: Re: Sear and then cook Reply with quote

atay04 wrote:
Hello All! I have purchased 6 ribeye steaks. Total weight is 5.36 lbs. I was told (which I normally do this...) to rub in olive oil, a little worchestershire and top with greek seasoning. After this, I am to pan sear and then put in 500 degree oven til done. If I would like medium steaks as an end result, how long do i cook this amount of meat in a 500 degree oven? I have in the past, not seared first, but rather, just put in 500 degree oven (for beef tenderloin), baked 8 minutes per pound and then turned off the oven for 3 hours and have had WONDERFUL results. Suggestions?


Ovens vary a bit, but about 10 minutes, give or take. A fast instant read thermometer would be helpful. I pull mine at 125F, but that's not medium by any stretch of my imagination.

That's a hot oven. I jacked mine to 550 last week to blast the crust of a cottage pie and I thought my geezer range was going to explode.

Biggles
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lintonschoice



Joined: 30 Nov 2011
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Wed Nov 30, 2011 4:51 am    Post subject: Searing My Steak Reply with quote

The flavor of the seared top and bottom of the steak IMO is where the flavor is with the seasonings. I like mine medium rare so it holds juices. I can see if well done that it would dry it out.
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