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cast-iron pantina: Is it carbon or cooked-on grease?

 
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CynthiaR
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 04, 2006 3:21 pm    Post subject: cast-iron pantina: Is it carbon or cooked-on grease? Reply with quote

My favorite saute pans are a well-seasoned cast iron skillet and an equally well-seasoned carbon steel wok. I love cooking with these pieces and love eating the food they turn out. Even so, I am left with this nagging question: does the seasoning fully carbonize or does some remain, to be re-melted into any dish I make? That is, does the fat from my seasoning add to the fat content of my food? Thanks.
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 28, 2006 9:17 pm    Post subject: carbonization Reply with quote

Cynthia,

The "fat" you're talking about is made up of long chains of hydrocarbons. Cast iron cookware reaches and retains such high temperature that only the carbon remains from the fat, and everything else burns off. Effectively, there's no "fat" left in the pan.

-Ryan
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DrBiggles



Joined: 12 May 2005
Posts: 352
Location: Richmond, CA

PostPosted: Wed Mar 29, 2006 10:40 pm    Post subject: Re: cast-iron pantina: Is it carbon or cooked-on grease? Reply with quote

CynthiaR wrote:
My favorite saute pans are a well-seasoned cast iron skillet and an equally well-seasoned carbon steel wok. I love cooking with these pieces and love eating the food they turn out. Even so, I am left with this nagging question: does the seasoning fully carbonize or does some remain, to be re-melted into any dish I make? That is, does the fat from my seasoning add to the fat content of my food? Thanks.


As Ryan has already pointed out, you're doing fine. However, sometimes this isn't enough and you don't feel comfortable cooking in such pans. If this turns out to be the case you are more than welcome to donate them to Meathenge Labs. I would be happy to take posession of those nasty old things and give them a happy, healthy home for many years to come.

Biggles
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