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Recipe File: Prime Rib or Standing Rib Roast
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Joined: 10 May 2005
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PostPosted: Tue Dec 20, 2005 7:45 am    Post subject: Recipe File: Prime Rib or Standing Rib Roast Reply with quote


Article Digest:
Prime rib used to refer to a prime grade standing rib roast, but these days all rib roasts (and some rib steaks) are called prime rib regardless of the USDA grade it recieved. The rib roast cut is usually so good that it doesn't need much seasoning. The ingredients I use are simple: a standing rib roast, salt, and pepper.

Preparation is also quite simplistic for an entree with such a grand reputation. In fact, with a couple tools, this dish is easier to prepare than any other special event food (roast duck, turkey). The items you'll need are a roasting pan (usually comes with your oven or you can get a large baking pan and a wire rack to place in it), a probe thermometer (like the Polder model that I use), some kitchen twine, and a pair of tongs.

Hmmm, now you need a standing rib roast (also known as prime rib even if the beef isn't prime quality). The term "standing" means that because the bones are included in the roast, the roast can stand by itself. A rib roast with the bones removed is commonly referred to as a rolled rib roast. My preference is for the standing variety because the bones provide additional flavoring to the roast. A rib roast comprises of seven ribs starting from the shoulder (chuck) down the back to the loin. Each rib feeds about two people, so if you have a party of eight, buy and cook a four rib roast. The rib roast closest to the loin is more tender than the rib roast nearest the chuck. This end is referred to as the small end rib roast or loin rib roast or sirloin tip roast. The chuck end of the rib roast is bigger and tougher and is sometimes referred to as a half standing rib roast or large end rib roast.

Depending on preference, you can dry age the roast for a few days to bring out additional flavor and produce a more buttery texture in the muscle (aging allows the natural enzymes to break down some of protein in the meat). Age the beef up to a week in the refrigerator by leaving it uncovered on a wire rack over a large pan to catch any drippings for at least a day and no more than seven days. When you are ready to cook the beef, trim off any dried pieces after the aging. It is common for a roast to lose about 10% to 15% of its weight during a week of aging.

Take the rib roast out of the refrigerator and let it sit on the counter for a couple hours to raise the roast temperature to near room temperature. To help cook the roast evenly, we'll need to tie the roast. Using kitchen twine, tie the roast parallel to the rib bones at least at each end. I usually tie between each pair of ribs. Heat the roasting pan or a separate pan on the stove until hot with a little oil. Place the roast on the pan and sear for three minutes on each side. Remove from heat and season heavily with salt and pepper. Place on the grill of your roasting pan or on a wire rack. Now stick the probe of your thermometer into the roast so that the probe is approximately in the middle of the roast (and not touching a bone). Position the pan on an oven rack in the lowest position of your preheated 200°F oven. Yes, 200°F. The low heat will evenly cook the roast so that most of the roast will be at the desired temperature. Cooking at a higher temperature will finish the roast faster, but you will probably result in well-done on the outside of the roast that gradually results in a medium-rare interior (if you are trying to cook a medium-rare roast). Roasting at 200°F will result in almost all the meat ending at medium-rare.

Set your thermometer for 130&#176F for a medium-rare roast (125°F for rare; 145°F for medium; any higher and it's overdone - you might as well be serving a cheaper piece of beef). When the roast is done (about 45 minutes per pound), remove from the oven, set the roast aside, and let it sit to redistribute juices for at least twenty minutes. This is a good time to make a jus from the drippings of the roast.

Pour off any extra grease that's collected in the pan. You can save this to make Yorkshire pudding if you wish. Now deglaze the pan by pouring in 1/2 cup beef broth and bring to a boil. After you've scraped off the bottom of your pan and mixed it into the jus, season with salt and pepper. Simple.

When slicing the roast, first cut the rib bones out and then lie the roast on the cut side to carve large slices off the roast.
[IMG]


When properly roasted, the medium-rare pink is uniform to the edges of the roast, giving the diner the maximum amount of tender, juicy beef per slice.
[IMG]

Standing Rib Roast
Preheat oven to 200°F (95°C)
1 loin rib roast, trimmed & tiedsearseasonroast at 200°F (90°F) until 130°F (55°C)
salt
pepper

Jus
rib roast drippingsdeglazebring to boilseason
1/2 cup beef broth
salt
pepper

Yorkshire pudding
Preheat oven to 450°F (230°C)
1 cup all purpose flourwhiskbeatpour mixture into panbake 450°F (230°F) 15 min.bake 350°F (175°F) until golden brown (15 min.)
1/2 tsp. salt
2 large eggswhisk
1 cup whole milk
13 x 9 in. pan10 min. at 450°Fmelt
1/4 cup rib roast drippings or
4 Tbs. melted unsalted butter
Copyright Michael Chu 2004
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PostPosted: Tue Dec 20, 2005 7:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Do engineers in your part of the world use Fahrenheit? Sounds exotic to a person living in the metric world.
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1617
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Tue Dec 20, 2005 7:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Okay, there's been a lot of commentary on slashdot and other sites on why a REAL engineer would use FAKE / LAME units. This is the only response I'll give.

In my mind, a real engineer is capable of working with whatever is given to him. A good engineer might not do an exact sixteenth decimal place conversion, but a good engineer will know when a precise conversion is necessary and an imprecise one is acceptable. Most engineers are capable of working in whatever unit constraints are provided them and can think in US, metric, or SI. I have conversations with engineers from other countries routinely where we will both use inches, microns, degrees celcius, and pounds in the same conversation.

I happen to live (and cook) in the United States where we use a weird system involving seemlingly random and confusing units. So, I present my recipes with these units because I will be using these units when I cook.

Now scientists on the other hand are a different breed from engineers and will require SI units...
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PostPosted: Tue Dec 20, 2005 7:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

For the Yorkshire pudding, you have to ensure the fat is really hot before you add the pancake mix (which is all that yourshire pudding is) - hot as in at the point of smoking.

Also if you don't have dripping, use lard. Don't use butter.
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PostPosted: Tue Dec 20, 2005 7:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't tie my roast, or sear it.

I use a 250F oven.

I slice under the layer of fat that is traditional on the outside of the roast and slip slices of garlic clove between the fat and the meat. I also do this with any 'center' fat - pierce between the fat and the meat with a knife and slide in garlic.

Then I make a mix of herbs, cracked pepper, and course grain 'kosher' salt. I roll the meat in this mixture, creating a crust. Then I place it bones down into a baking dish and bake until medium rare.
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PostPosted: Tue Dec 20, 2005 7:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The above additions for a tasty crust sound yummy!

I have made Yorkshire pudding in individual portions using a 12-portion muffin pan with 1 teaspoon of pan drippings/muffin cup per the Good Housekeeping cookbook recipe.

Great site, Michael!
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PostPosted: Tue Dec 20, 2005 7:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

regarding the SI units topic...

My high school physics teacher would sometimes throw in problems using English units because he wanted the students to be able to solve problems using any kind of units, so he would probably agree with you here.

He did tell us a funny story of a one student who was against using English units. In protest, the student would convert any English units given to metric, solve the problem, then convert back to English units for the answer. =)
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ACO
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PostPosted: Tue Dec 20, 2005 7:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

English, Metric, IS... all the same. Sure, depending on wich hemisphere or influence zone you're in, one gets used to one or another metric system.

As an engineer one is prepared to work in either system, but that also depends on tool graduation. I always use the KISS principle to work, trying to get good results in a short time. Converting units from a system to another is time consuming, so is better for me to work with raw units, be those celsius, fahrenheit, kelvin or rankine.

This recipee also looks tasty, I'll try to try it before year's end.

keep it up, mike.

KISS: Keep It Simple & Stupid
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Alredhead
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PostPosted: Tue Dec 20, 2005 7:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is my family's traditional Christmas meal...hmmm I can smell it now!

(I have an enormous piece in my fridge right this minute, just waiting to be cooked and eaten!)

Mr. Cho, Merry Christmas to you and yours!
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PostPosted: Tue Dec 20, 2005 7:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think you should post the temperatures in Kelvin. Your stove DOES do Kelvin, right?
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PostPosted: Tue Dec 20, 2005 7:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just did a prime rib last night for Christmas Eve dinner - our roast was just a shade under 10 lbs. For the rub I used approximately 2 TB whole pepper and a scant 1 TB whole allspice; ground this in a mortar, added approximately 1 1/2 TB kosher salt, about a half-dozen garlic cloves, finely minced, 1/4 cup Dijon mustard, 1 TB dry mustard, and about 1 TB maple syrup. Mixed this together well, coated the roast with it and let is sit for about 1 1/2 hours before roasting. If I would have had more time, I would have let it marinate for a few hours more. Started it at 450F for 20 minutes, then lowered the heat to 250-275F until the internal temperature registerd 125F. Total cooking time was about 3 hours. Came out perfectly medium rare in the middle, with the end cuts at medium. The end cuts have a nice zing to them from the rub, while the middle slices had just enough seasoning without being too spicy.
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PostPosted: Tue Dec 20, 2005 7:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Me again, stealing your recipes! They are excellent, that's why I keep coming back.
As an editor, I wish you would use the supercript o with F or C, with a space after the degrees number.
Also, what would help lots of us in uniformizing would be to use Tbsp for tablespoon and tsp for tsp. But this does not hurt one bit your excellent recipes.
Thanks!
Caroline
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PostPosted: Tue Dec 20, 2005 7:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't believe an editor would use a word such as "uniformizing".
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PostPosted: Wed Dec 21, 2005 7:29 pm    Post subject: How do I re-heat it, if I make it ahead? Reply with quote


The cooking time is 3-4hours for the standing rib roast. If I dared to make it the night before, how could I re-heat it without ruining the rare-ness of it (the microwave cooks too well done from the inside out)

Any tips are appreciated - I am a first time S.R.R. cooker!! thanks
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NAFortis



Joined: 14 Dec 2005
Posts: 3

PostPosted: Wed Dec 21, 2005 8:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good morning, Michael. In re Cooking temperature: In his "American Cookery" copyright 1972, chef James Beard offers a <preheated 180 to 200 degree oven> slow-roast method for standing rib, BUT he specifies "...roast without basting for approximately 23 to 24 minutes per pound, until it achieves an internal temperature of 120 to 125 degrees for rare meat; ..."
Your method specifies a far longer time per pound. How say you to Beard's time/pound? [I have not tried ANY low-heat method, only sear and temp reduce, etc]

Best regards & Happy Solstice: Nick F.
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