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Recipe File: Classic Roast Turkey
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artwoman1
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 17, 2005 5:24 pm    Post subject: drowsiness after eating turkey Reply with quote

The substance is tryptothan. I'm not sure this spelling is correct.

This is the substance that allows the family to do world-class beached whale imitations.

Some how those charged with the clean-up seem to be immune to its effects.
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 18, 2005 2:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

i read these posts with a smile...what a bunch of geeks. cooking a turkey is simple, nothing to it...but brining it is clearly required for juciness. by the way, im was trained at the CIA Laughing Out Loud
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futureboy
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 19, 2005 8:49 pm    Post subject: Sleepy turkey myth Reply with quote

About the substance in turkey that supposedly makes you sleepy, it's called L-Tryptophan, but it's present in a lot of things. There's more of it in chicken than turkey, and doctors consider the sleepiness due to L-Tryptophan to be a myth. See here:

http://www.psychologytoday.com/articles/pto-20031006-000001.html
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 21, 2005 5:52 am    Post subject: bacon bacon bacon! Reply with quote

i read a lot of tips that suggest placing thick bacon strips on the turkey's breast to add to the moisture and flavor. The strips are removed well before the turkey is done. Anyone tried this?

Take a look at:
http://www.globalgourmet.com/food/kgk/2000/1100/kgk111800.html
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guest
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 22, 2005 8:30 pm    Post subject: to brine or not Reply with quote

I have never had a brined turkey. I planning to slow roast in a roaster oven. What exactly is the advantage of brining?

Sandra in Nevada
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1617
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Tue Nov 22, 2005 10:25 pm    Post subject: Re: to brine or not Reply with quote

guest wrote:
I have never had a brined turkey. I planning to slow roast in a roaster oven. What exactly is the advantage of brining?

Brining not only adds flavor to the turkey meat, but it "loosens up" the protein so it can hold more water during the cooking process. The end result is that you have a juicier roast.

For more information, see Kitchen Notes: Brining
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 24, 2005 4:16 am    Post subject: roasting vs brining Reply with quote

I never brine my turkey as my family and friends HATE the taste. I always roast in a roaster oven with about the same method you use. I find roasting seals in more flavor than brining could ever add! Thanks for letting me vent! lol
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Gio
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 24, 2005 4:37 am    Post subject: Roast Turkey Reply with quote

Please, what is the correct term: Roast Turkey or Roasted Turkey?

thanks
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dingerlily
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 24, 2005 5:54 am    Post subject: brining made easy Reply with quote

Hello,I have brined a couple of turkeys!! They were delicious.I found that putting a garbage bag in an ice cooler is an easy way to brine!!
marty in Nevada
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Nancy_8805
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 24, 2005 7:58 am    Post subject: Really big Turkey Reply with quote

This year we managed to get a 40lb turkey. Talk about huge! We arent sure how to cook it. I was looking for reccomendations on cooking turkey and i cant find any guides that go over 25lbs Smile

Nancy From Arizona
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haute_sauce
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 24, 2005 6:56 pm    Post subject: brining the bird Reply with quote

While I might be true that I am an engineer, and a trained chef (CCA), I am also a big fan of pre-brined kosher birds (Empire is my weapon of choice). And in a review of roasting chickens (ok, different bird), it came out on top in 'Cooks Illustrated' testing (i think that was the mag), above free range, organic, etc. Call me lazy !
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guest
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 24, 2005 7:49 pm    Post subject: brining container Reply with quote

I've used Alton Brown's method for the past several years now and it always works beautifully. As to the container - a giant, non-reactive container that I've found works well - no matter how large the bird - is a good quality garbage bag. It's clean and all the air can be pressed out so that the bird doesn't have to be flipped. Rather than try to refrigerate it, I put the bag in a cooler with plenty of ice and keep it in the garage or back porch. Smile
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Jen
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PostPosted: Wed Dec 14, 2005 11:13 pm    Post subject: Thanks Reply with quote

Wow, who knew there could be so much to do. I have never brined, split the skin or anything beyond cleaning, coating with butter and seasonings, thrown in a roasting pan and covered with foil completley for basting and always has turned out great. Will have to try some of these suggestions! My step mother tried the slow cook foil bag last year and that was great two, she did that up side down.
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Liz in LA
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 03, 2006 12:53 am    Post subject: Brining a Turkey Reply with quote

When you're ready to brine your turkey, put a couple of those really big trash bags into a styrofoam cooler that you know is big enough to hold the turkey. Put the turkey in the bag(s), pour the brine solution over the turkey, close the bags up, place ice on top and put the cooler lid on. The whole kaboodle can brine away in the garage or on the back porch. And no messy cleanup!
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ellenskitchen.com
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 17, 2006 4:11 pm    Post subject: No plastic garbage bags for brining or food storage Reply with quote

Food-safe plastics are those which do not leach into the food. All the colored garbage bags are not food-safe, and the only white ones the manufacturers have described as food safe (and this was some years back) were the smallest white Glad brand trash bags (just a few quarts). Ziplock is making very large clear storage bags now- please don't use regular trash bags for brining or other food storage uses.
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