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Recipe File: Prime Rib or Standing Rib Roast
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IronRinger



Joined: 23 Nov 2011
Posts: 19

PostPosted: Wed May 08, 2013 3:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The only meat shop where I've seen "blade tenderized" meat is Costco. All their beef, with the exception of ground and tenderloin are treated this way, so ground and tenderloin are the only beef cuts I'll buy there. At least they are required to label such treated meat now. Last year, when there was a major e-coli issue at Costco's main Canadian supplier, several folks got sick from eating their steaks. I argue with DH constantly about this - he is prepared to risk eating Costco steaks med-rare, saying the hygiene problem at the supplier has been fixed and could never happen again. Yeah....right....

We're currently trying out local small butchers.
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 999
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Wed May 08, 2013 4:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

>>We're currently trying out local small butchers.

that's the best bet imho. mechanically tenderizing a cut only indicates - to me - it's not really a top quality cut. like seriously, if it was a quality cut to begin with - what's the point?

USDA Choice or Prime grades should not require artificial "tenderizing" - Canada has a different grading 'system' - but that is of zero meaning - either the cut is of a decent quality in terms of marbling / fat or it's a cheap substitute for 'the real thing'

to the best of my knowledge, there is no option in USA to take a "Utility" grade cut of meat, subject it to mechanical tenderizing, then label it "Choice / Prime" etc. the "labeled grade" on a chunk of meat must stem from a USDA inspection/grading process - which is not "free" for suppliers. the "USDA inspection" is free, the "USDA grading" is not free. falsifying the "grade" in USA based on mechanical treatment is an actionable offense.

Canada may be different, no clue.
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IronRinger



Joined: 23 Nov 2011
Posts: 19

PostPosted: Wed May 08, 2013 7:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dilbert wrote:
....Canada has a different grading 'system' - but that is of zero meaning - either the cut is of a decent quality in terms of marbling / fat or it's a cheap substitute for 'the real thing'....


Exactly! In Canada, the grades are A, AA, and AAA, with the quality/tenderness improving with the number of As on the label. AAA is supposed to be the primo grade, although I've seen a few high end restaurants describing their meat as AAAA. Supermarket beef is usually AA, and the cheapo butchers, like where my "value conscious" brother shops sell A. As in the USA, grading is done just after slaughter, never at the retail level.

Costco's beef is all AAA, and I just don't see why they need to adulterate it. BTW, I've heard that "blade tenderizing" is more common in the USA than here. I had never heard of the process before the afore mentioned e-coli situation, which triggered the requirement for all meat so treated to be labeled.
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 999
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Wed May 08, 2013 8:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

according to this:
http://www.canadabeef.ca/us/en/quality/Standards/default.aspx

Canada grades A, AA, AAA, Prime - (for youthful cattle, old cows have more grades....)
one could suspect quad-A (AAAA) is an alternate description for Prime, but who knows.

in the US it is not technical impossible to grade 'at the retail level' but it is highly impractical / expensive. under Federal US law, _only_ USDA Inspectors can assign a grading. there is no such thing as 'supplier grading' - slaughter houses must _pay_ for the services of a USDA Inspector to grade their meat / cuts / primals.

then - in USA,,, there's a whole raft of "label laws" - which very explicitly detail what words / phrases can be used on (in this case) meat labels.

I really doubt that Canadian law permits a meat vendor to take an A graded meat, punch it full of holes to make it more tender, and then label it AA or AAA or Prime/AAAA.

I've not seen that jaccarded product around here - but my bet: it is not illegal to shred a roast and put it on the shelf for sale with a "super tender" label, omitting any mention of an actual USDA grade.

showing the USDA grade is actually _not_ required in USA. what is not legal is labeling / selling meat as a _higher / better_ grade than it is known to be. markets could put USDA Prime on the shelf as "Roast comma beef" and that's not a problem. however, put a chunk/slice/portion of a primal that (a) has not been graded or graded less than "Choice / Prime" in a package labelled Choice / Prime will land somebody in jail. well, if we could get the bureaucrats off their donkey.....
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TeflonTaylor
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 09, 2013 9:32 am    Post subject: slow cooked rib roast (and yorkies) Reply with quote

Great site!

My best way to SLOW cook a rib roast is thus:

I use a 2 or 1 rib. Scale up by splitting a 7 rib into twos and a one, unless you wish to experiment. Feel free but it may work out costly!

25 hours before you want to eat (for the 2-rib; the single rib does better in about 18 hours)

Put the oven on 55-60 Deg C ; 140 Deg F, best done in an oven with NO FAN.

Put the joint in a roasting tin, I prefer to stand it up if it's a 2, a single you would have to lay down.

Roast for 24 hours. If you want it for lunch the next day put it on just before you go to bed as it will stand an hour easily without losing heat, if you only carve it when you want to serve.

If it has a good layer of fat, and is a good quality cut, you should get good tasty umami-packed jelly stock in the bottom of the pan too.

When it's finished, whack the oven up to it's max - 250 C for me,

and put some dripping into the tins - I use muffin trays and beef dripping and put the tin in the oven to heat up with the oven. You want that dripping to be smoking!

Whisk four eggs into three large serving spoons (this is my tablespoon, it was my grandmother's and is most definitely more than 25 ml but I do know that one heaped of flour is one ounce, and one rounded of sugar is one ounce and never need to follow recipes) of plain all purpose flour, with no raising agents in. Beat half to death and then add milk still beating until it is like double cream.

This is a batter mix to make the yorkshire puds.

When the oven is up to temp, take out the tray carefully, it's very hot, and pour the batter into the tin. The amount above will make 12. Use a jug is best.

Put the tray back in the oven, and cook for 10 minutes at high temp THEN OPEN THE DOOR (this lets out excess steam) and drop the temp to 200 C, 400 F, and cook for another 20 mins. It works if you don't open the door but not as well, and if you don't turn it down they will burn.

Meanwhile, you have the veg cooking, I hope. And you add a tablespoon of that flour again to the juices left in the pan, and stir, then add veg water or stock to this and cook gently to make fab gravy.

Time to carve.

50-60 Deg C, 140F sets the protein in the meat. Overcooked beef (or lamb, or liver) is a sin of the highest order. 50 Deg will leave the beef in a 2 rib certainly rare, and leaves option to recook what's left.

I tried a fan oven once and it cooked in shorter time but wasn't as good and there were no juices left to make gravy.

There are folk out there who say you should let the batter for Yorkshire pud stand - I say there is no need.

Traditionally, the Yorkshire pud was cooked below the roast, to gather the drips, and was eaten before the meat to fill you up a bit so you didn't mind less meat. This would have been truly stodgy, very filling, and delicious if you do it under chicken. VERY calorie rich but hey, this is food!
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brighteyes5423
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 20, 2013 9:38 pm    Post subject: rib roast ? Reply with quote

I want to prepare a standing rib roast for Christmas and have a recipe, slightly different from all I have read on here. It calls for 450F for 15 minutes, reducing to 325F until roast reaches 130Ffor rare or 145 for medium. (cooking time on a 6-8 lb roast). Any suggestions or comments?
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1619
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Fri Dec 20, 2013 10:02 pm    Post subject: Re: rib roast ? Reply with quote

brighteyes5423 wrote:
I want to prepare a standing rib roast for Christmas and have a recipe, slightly different from all I have read on here. It calls for 450F for 15 minutes, reducing to 325F until roast reaches 130Ffor rare or 145 for medium. (cooking time on a 6-8 lb roast). Any suggestions or comments?

It won't come out as good, but it should suffice if you prefer to follow that recipe.
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CaesarV
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 21, 2013 3:25 am    Post subject: Costco Reply with quote

So I just bought a Costco vacuum-packed USDA Choice rib roast (21 lbs.) There was no mention of the word "tenderized" or "bladed" anywhere on the package and it only had the standard, generic food safety label.

In any case, this will be my 3rd year of following this recipe. Previous years have been a bit too rare so I will take it out when the temp is about 5 deg higher this time.

Three questions:
1. Does Costco still tenderize the meat, and if so, must it be labeled as such? FYI, I am in California in case the rules are different from state to state.

2. Is there any general consensus as to when the roast should be seared; at the beginning or at the end of the cooking time?

3. I have a convection oven. Should convection be on or off...or does it just not matter much?
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 999
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Sat Dec 21, 2013 12:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

USDA regs require labeling for "injected" stuff - not sure about plain old mechanical-no-injection. one wonders why Costco would blade a choice cut - lesser grades I can understand.

see
http://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsis/newsroom/news-releases-statements-transcripts/news-release-archives-by-year/archive/2013/NR-060613-01

as of June 2013 it appears "just" mechanically tenderized need not be labeled

I do mine convection off.

as to searing for crust before / after, that's always a large debate.
I prefer to do it at the end based on the WYSIWYG principle. done at the start it can change during cooking.
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daveo
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PostPosted: Sun Dec 22, 2013 5:12 pm    Post subject: long end 11 pound choice standing rib roast Reply with quote

I am cooking 11 lb. rib roast on Christmas eve. We leave house at 315 for church and will be back at aprox. 530 and will eat at 600. Is there a method of cooking this roast that will allow me to turn oven off for 2 hours when I leave house without overcooking? I am dry aging for aprox. 3 1/2, so weight will be less after trimming.
Thank you,
Dave O
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 999
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Sun Dec 22, 2013 9:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

if you insist on turning the oven off while you're out . . . .

there are methods where the roast goes in a hot preheated oven for x minutes, turn the oven off and allow to stand for y hours.

some variations turn the oven back on toward the end.

never done it that way so no can provide any clues - but they're all labeled as "fool proof"

regardless, home at 5:30 and sit down at 6:00 could be a bit ambitious for the roast and all the rest of the fixings, unless it all being served cold.
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Canuk Bill
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PostPosted: Tue Dec 24, 2013 1:44 am    Post subject: Costco (Canada) Reply with quote

The bulk vac packed roasts in Costco Canada are not tenderized. Tenderizing is usually done when the beef is cut down into retail portions and repacked before sale.
Most Canadian retailers are still blade tenderizing their beef roasts and steaks according to a follow-up episode of CBC Marketplace and very few are following Health-Canada's guideline that they label their products as such. Costco Canada is one of those few retailers complying with the guideline although they have changed from a separate red printed label to an inconspicuous note on the price tag advising to cook to medium/well.
Because retailers in general are not complying with the voluntary requirements, Health Canada is expected to make labeling mandatory in 2014.
US consumers may want to ask their butcher if they tenderize although if the meat is processed and packed before hitting the store, the staff would not necessarily know this.
Because of this problem I have switched to a local family butcher who does not tenderize roasts and will supply non-tenderized steaks on request. I much prefer to pay a small premium to be guaranteed that cooking to medium rare will not risk food poisoning.
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Jim Cooley



Joined: 09 Oct 2008
Posts: 314
Location: Seattle

PostPosted: Tue Dec 24, 2013 6:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks, Canuck.

I shop at Costco #1 right here in Seattle and will inquire next time I go down.

Today is not such a good day -- Chrstmas Eve, lol.
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RussW
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 27, 2013 4:31 am    Post subject: Another BBQ data point Reply with quote

I cooked an exquisite 12.5lb standing rib roast yesterday, cooked to perfection using some oh the helpful tips on this page/thread; thanks everyone! But my approach differed a bit and I thought I would share to help others who want to use a BBQ and get the additional flavor that smoking will provide. I used a standard kettle style BBQ, nothing special except for some snap in charcoal holders to keep the coals at the sides of the kettle. I used about 5lbs of Jack Daniels whiskey barrel charcoal, and smoking chips for flavor, but any slow burning charcoal/chip combo will work. Don't use Kingsford it is too fast/hot.

I started by searing the roast while the coals were hot. Placed it over the charcoal one one side of the kettle, covered for 5 mins then rolled it over to the opposite side foe another 5 mins. Heavy duty rubber gloves are essential for moving the roast around. The grill was a tad too hot, the strings holding the rib rack to the roast burned through. I moved the roast to the center of the BBQ, got a pan and put new strings across it then pulled the roast off the grill, placed it in the pan and re-tied it. While I was doing this I closed the vents on the grill so the charcoal would slow down. After about 10 minutes I put the roast back on the grill in the center between the charcoal so it would be indirectly heated. I inserted the dual temperature digital thermometer probe, added wet wood chips and the wood blocks that come with the charcoal and covered with the vents 1/2 open. The thermometer registered 55F on the meat and went up to about 345F inside the grill. I closed the vents further and the temp lowered to 325.

After about two hours the thermometer was reading in the low 90's. This was about an hour earlier than I planned; the roast would be finished too early. So after another 1/2 hour the thermometer read 110F so I removed it from the grill so we could finish making the dinner. I covered it loosely with foil and let it sit on the kitchen counter with the temp probe still in. In the 45 minutes it rested, the temp went up from 110F to 133F !! At that point we were ready to eat so I sliced it up and the meat was perfectly medium rare, and only about 1/4" of browned meat at the surface. But that outer section was so very flavorful it easily makes up for the little bit of overcooking.

In Summary:

Use about 5 lbs of charcoal in a kettle style BBQ. Separate the coals into two piles on the sides so the meat is indirectly heated.

Sear the meat either in the oven at 500f for 15 mins or on the grill, but slow the coals down first or the string will burn.

Add wet wood chips after searing.

Roast at a grill temp of 325F for two hours, checking regularly and adjusting the vents to keep the temperature correct. Use a dual temp thermometer to measure grill temp and meat temp.

When temp reaches 110F, remove and cover with foil. Let rest until it reaches the desired temp then slice and enjoy! It will take about 45 mins for it to reach the 130's.
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Y&dotte
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 01, 2014 1:59 pm    Post subject: Large Rib Roasts Reply with quote

Thanks for posting this wonderful cooking method. I used this for a 9 lb Delmonico roast this past year for Christmas Dinner.
I seared the roast on a skillet before placing in the oven
Oven was set at 200 degrees F

I checked the roast at 4 hours, and it had already sailed past medium rare (it was at 128 degrees), so I took it out immediately.

I was cooking at someone elses's house, using their instant read thermometer, so I was nervous - I poked at the roast to see how loose it felt, and it felt RARE. Even more nervous, but I had to go with common sense and my equipment, so I just let it rest. When I sliced into it, that decision proved sound. The roast was in fact between medium rare and medium, and while it was a little further cooked than I wanted it, it was fabulously tender and cooked EVENLY from center to edge.

So, a couple of observations:
    [ul]The linear approach to extending cooking times for larger roasts may not be completely valid - start checking your roast at 3-3 1/2 hours.
    [ul]The roast will feel a LOT looser than it actually is.
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