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Recipe File: Prime Rib or Standing Rib Roast
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MarkG
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 05, 2012 1:28 am    Post subject: Foiled by Imperial vs. Celsius Reply with quote

So, bought a fantastic cut of Canadian Prime Angus Rib Roast. One rib, 1.02 kilos, family of 4. Thought I'd make a nice Sundays roast, invited mom and brother. Found this site, guy up there in the 2006 section added a mustard rub (minced garlic, mustard powder, prepared mustard, chili powder, no onion salt, switched prepared for dijon, added pepercorns). Running late, busy sunday. Got the roast out at 2:00, fine, dinner at 6. Roast on the bbq at 4:30 with olive oil and sea salt and fresh ground pepper, high heat. Sear 3 minutes a side. Looking GREAT! Smells fantastic! Into a roasting pan on a layer of onions, surrounded by potatoes and carrots. Into the oven at 4:30 @200 Fahrenheit. Darn, forgot to put the rub on. Out of oven rub on. Back in oven 5:00. 45 minute check. What the heck? Only 58 degrees? OK times getting late. Oven to 250 Fahrenheit. 30 minute check: 72 degrees. Something is NOT right. Oven too cold? What is going on? Oven to 350, kids are really cranky, wife wondering how much longer. I'm going crazy. 6:50 check: 95 degrees. I'm at a loss, mom and brother had to go. Time to Call in my wife for a second look. "hey, I didn't know you checked temp in Celsius" she says. WHAT! Oh man roast is now at 104, darn. That's just over 200, I hate well done, that's the whole reason for doing it myself and not putting it through my wife's leather making process. Anyways, long story longer, tasted OK, vegetables were good, meat was way overdone.
Lessons learned: when changing batteries in the digital thermometer, don't forget to reset to Fahrenheit to match the oven, or buy next oven with celsius only.
Just thought I'd share after getting all the above advice on my first roast experience.
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 971
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Mon Mar 05, 2012 12:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

[ouch] my sympathies!

I've done silly things like that - the most aggravating part is all along you have this nagging feeling 'something ain't right . . . '
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Denanfer



Joined: 16 Apr 2012
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Mon Apr 16, 2012 6:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the recipe, I'm trying new dishes to cook. and this one caught my attention. tried it a couple of times it was hard to have the perfect crusty effect Anger any ways still worked out fine Big smile
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Tojorisin
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 24, 2012 3:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I review this site every year before I cook up a prime rib (I have done 5 large ones so far, a bigger one each time.) I am very thankful to all that have posted as the shared experiences make it less intimidating to tackle cooking an expensive piece of meat! I did a 20lb boneless prime rib roast on my weber genesis silver B gas rotisserie, my largest yet and it was amazing! I only used a single front burner almost on the lowest setting to hit that 220-ish mark and checked temps about once an hour until I started getting close to 130. I let it rest for about 30 minutes while I finished other items and carved the turkey that I had also made. It was a beautiful, even pink from end to end and I could not be happier! Can't wait until I cook the next one.
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Canuk Bill
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 25, 2012 2:19 pm    Post subject: Bladed or mechanically tenderized cuts Reply with quote

Costco Canada along with some other retailers has recently added a notice to almost all of their beef roasts and steaks stating that they have been mechanically tenderized or 'bladed' and recommends that they be cooked to an internal temperature of 160'F or 71'C. This follows a CBC consumer report on the meat retail industry showing that most cuts are processed in this way and may have surface bacteria transferred to the inside. As a person who had previously thought that cooking the outside of a cut above 160' would make it safe, this is disturbing to say the least. Anger
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IronRinger



Joined: 23 Nov 2011
Posts: 19

PostPosted: Mon Nov 26, 2012 5:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I also was appalled to learn that Costco was mechanically tenderizing solid muscle beef cuts. Several customers in Edmonton contracted e-coli from consuming grilled Costco steaks, which we had hitherto considered of primo quality and a staple of our summer grilling menus.

From now on, I will be inquiring at all butcher counters if they use this totally unnecessary and unsafe practice, before I purchase. NO WAY do I want to cook steaks or roasts to 160F. I'd hate to have to substitute meatloaf for standing rib roast, but at least it won't be tough if cooked to well done.
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PostPosted: Wed Dec 19, 2012 8:44 pm    Post subject: Geat post Reply with quote

I discovered this post several years ago and keep referring back. Thanks for keeping the web site up. This will be my 4th or 5th one. Each one has been perfect med. rare all the way through. This year Costco has "prime" available and I will be getting it to see if there is much difference. Cooking time is pretty spot on for me. Thanks.
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 24, 2012 3:53 pm    Post subject: 19-lbs Reply with quote

Like many on this post, I am attempting my first bone-in rib roast for Christmas eve family dinner. Knowing I needed quantity, I bought a 19-lb one and all the info provided on this site have been helpful. 2 questions though: am I to have the oven 225-250 on roast or bake and is it easier to cut the roast in half, pre-cooking, to insure I can deliver med-rare and medium without a hassle? I'm not worried about presentation.
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 971
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Mon Dec 24, 2012 4:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I did an office party dinner once for like 40 people - used multiple 10 lb roasts - I think it is a bit easier to manage than one large.

obviously having two roasts would make the medium/medium rare thing much easier - you can simply start one about an hour earlier than the medium rare.

it also depends on the projected quantity of each you may need - i.e. typically the ends of the roast are more medium than m-rare, to a depth of perhaps 3/4-1 inch. however if half the crowd wants medium, you'll need more medium than that.
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jsmit86
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PostPosted: Wed Dec 26, 2012 12:34 am    Post subject: Prime Rib Reply with quote

I have learned a lot from this forum. This is i the third year that I have cooked using the low and slow method.

I got a nice 16lb roast from a local market (Elburn Market in Elburn, IL.)
I prepped the roast yesterday inserting garlic slivers in slits, rubbed with a bit of olive oil, and then salted it well.

I let the roast warm up from about 34 degrees F to about 46F by letting is sit covered in foil and some towels.

At about 12PM, I put it in the oven at 200F for the first 1.5 hours, and then turned the oven down to 190. At about 4:15 PM, the roast hit my target temp of 121F. I covered and let it rest until about 5PM, and then finished it in the oven at 500F.

It came out beautifully. Perfect Med Rare throughout. The crust had a really nice flavor.

I have done the sear first, and the sear last method, and I am sold on the sear last method. It seems to produce more even results, although both methods make a tasty roast.



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motorhed



Joined: 12 Dec 2012
Posts: 3
Location: South Windsor, CT

PostPosted: Wed Dec 26, 2012 2:55 pm    Post subject: Standing Rib Roasts 2012 Reply with quote

BEST EVER RIB ROAST!!!

I did 2 choice 5-rib roasts (bones intact), 9.5 and 9.6 pounds trimmed, respectively. I dry aged them in my second fridge (rarely opened) on a flat rack over a 1/2 sheet pan, covered by a cotton cloth (t-shirt). I changed the shirt every other day; each roast lost ~1#. I covered each with a generous amount of kosher salt and fresh cracked black pepper and let them rest on the counter uncovered for 1 hour before roasting. Oven was at 200° (no convention fan), and they roasted for ~5.5 hours. Internal temperature each hour: started at 35, 43, 61, 82, 103, 122, and I pulled them at 128. They cruised to 138° on the countertop over the next 30 minutes. I cut the bones off and served them separately; they were nicely cooked. Beef was medium-rare on the ends and rare in the middle, with a fabulously tasty crust. As tender and juicy as any prime rib I have ever had.

The only rub was that there was little juice in the sheet pan, afterwards. That's what Williams-Sonoma's beef/veal concentrated demi is for.
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CristalM
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 11, 2013 10:46 am    Post subject: Rubs, searing, bones, and other thoughts Reply with quote

Traditionally our family does a turkey for almost every holiday, but this last Christmas I felt the need for veriety. I decided to do a Prime Rib. I work at a meat counter and find that the holidays have a cycle around here, Turkeys for Thanksgiving, Prime Rib for Christmas, and Ham for Easter. I wanted to know what the fuss was all about, so I took the plunge.
The Roast: After much debating and arguing (mainly with myself) I decided that a 5 lb roast would be about right for the 5 of us. That's Grandma, Mom, Me, My Husband and His Brother. In eating translation, 2 light eaters, 1 average eater, and 2 healthy young men. In the end we ate all but one steak and the meat off the bones, but they made delicious leftovers. Most people get their roasts "Cut and Tied" meaning that while we process the meat we cut it off the bones and tie it back on. This makes serving so easy as the steaks just lift off the bone... kinda. If you like seasoning between the bones and the meat you can either ask for it cut but not tied and season it yourself, or you can choose from one of the house seasonings to be put on before the bones are tied back on. Due to a bit of a fiasco that happened as they tried to get me my roast I didn't worry about putting seasoning in the middle and I don't think I lost a thing for it. The roast I received in the end was aproximately the 3rd and 4th bone, a bit closer to the chuck end but for marbled because of it, Cut and Tied.
The Rub: Oh the wealth of seasonings and pre-measured rubs and mixes presented to the begining roast cooker. Do your self a favor, don't even concider it. If you want to go "Super simple" then get a house rub and have the butcher season your roast for you; otherwise, be simple! If you can't tick off the ingreedients for your roast rub on one hand you're making it too complicated. After contimplating many recipies and co-workers and customers I found that most rubs come down to either a seasoned Salt Crust or a Herb Rub. While fresher will provide more flavor I tend to use dried because it doesn't start growing (or worse molding) if I don't us it within 2 weeks. The rub I finally picked was one featured on a youtube short (http://youtu.be/ZOnFdyEJEI4), the simplicity of the rub appealed to me especially because my husband was doing all the cooking and I didn't feel that a tricky salt crust was either afordable or in his league. Don't get me wrong, he's an excelent cook, but I'm probably just a bit to particular about my meats. I could go on and on about different reasons I picked my rub, but when it comes right down to it I picked it cause the price was right, we already had all the ingreadients.
Searing and Cooking: I admit, I skip searing. I know, it's supposed to add flavor by... adding something to the party, but I've never been able to identify what. So I take the lasy route and skip searing all together. Maybe when I reach the cooking chapter in my Cooking for Geeks cook book I'll understand it better. For the pan I used a large pot like roasting pan with rack... well I wanted to use the rack to make lifting the roast out easier but I wasn't there to manage the kitchen so the rack was left out in favor of the one provied naturally by the roast, which does not have handles. The Roast was seasoned then put in this pan/pot before anything else was put together. I'm not sure when the roast "could have" gone into the oven, but it didn't go into the oven till all the other parts to dinner were prepped and ready. It was roasted in a 350F oven till my probe thermometer informed us that it had reached 130F inside the roast, then it was left to set under foil for about a half hour. Doneness was perfect, even for my brother in law who askes for "proof that the cow his steak came from is burning in hell". My husband suggested that we should have Prime Rib more oftain, not just for holidays... then learned how much it would have cost us if I hadn't pulled out all the tricks I had and bought it on holiday sale.
Oh, and the dog loved the bone she got. Just remember pet safety and supervise dogs with rib bone (many treats for that matter), they have a chance of splintering and getting sharp pieces lodged in esophguses.
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Canuk Bill
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PostPosted: Tue May 07, 2013 5:27 am    Post subject: Blade tenderizing in Canada Reply with quote

Health Canada has recently amended their safe cook guidelines for blade tenderized meat and quite properly listed it in the section with ground meats. Blade tenderizing is the norm for almost all retail sources in central Canada.
Is it worth buying tenderized prime rib and then (over)cooking it to 71'C or 160'F?
If we do not follow the new recommendations, at least we know the risk.
** http://www.healthycanadians.gc.ca/eating-nutrition/safety-salubrite/cook-temperatures-cuisson-eng.php
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1606
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Tue May 07, 2013 7:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Over the years I've modified how I cook my standing rib roasts slightly. I use a thermocouple and data logger these days and actually cycle my oven on (170F is the lowest it goes) and off maintaining a core roast temperature of 130F-135F depending on desired level of doneness. At 130F, holding the roast temperature for 2 hours is sufficient to pasteurize it. At 135F, 1 hour will pasteurize. At 140F, only 30 min is needed. If you are unable to get an intact roast and only have access to a tenderized (where someone other than you has jabbed it full of slits/holes) roast, then I highly recommend attempting to pasteurize the roast before serving to others.
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Canuk bill
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PostPosted: Tue May 07, 2013 12:29 pm    Post subject: safe cooking temps Reply with quote

Michael Chu wrote:
Over the years I've modified how I cook my standing rib roasts slightly. I use a thermocouple and data logger these days and actually cycle my oven on (170F is the lowest it goes) and off maintaining a core roast temperature of 130F-135F depending on desired level of doneness. At 130F, holding the roast temperature for 2 hours is sufficient to pasteurize it. At 135F, 1 hour will pasteurize. At 140F, only 30 min is needed. If you are unable to get an intact roast and only have access to a tenderized (where someone other than you has jabbed it full of slits/holes) roast, then I highly recommend attempting to pasteurize the roast before serving to others.


This is in line with sous vide cooking methods - 55 C (131 F) to 60 C (140 F) so makes a lot of sense. Government regulations do not take into account longer cooking times so err on the side of safety.
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