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Kitchen Notes: Baker's Yeast
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1008
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Sat Feb 21, 2009 6:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Melissa -

you might want to elaborate on what you want to do - I'm not sure I correctly understand the question, but some basic points:

fresh pizza dough is most often "stored" in a ball shape; when it is needed it is rolled, shaped, spun in the air, <whatever> into the pan.

the rising of any yeast dough will slow down dramatically when refrigerated. from that perspective, you might not have a "problem" at all - if you're talking about a couple hours, certainly not. overnight,,, the dough will rise noticeably over a 18-24 hour period, even in the fridge.
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heather
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 25, 2009 2:14 am    Post subject: bakers yeast (in form of a block like margarine) Reply with quote

I found your site useful esp. with bakers yeast. i bought some from a bakery and need to know exactly how to use it.
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1008
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Wed Mar 25, 2009 11:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

little foil wrapped cubes of (fresh) yeast?

keep refrigerated, use fairly soon - it does not keep forever - can be frozen.

crumble and dissolve in warm liquid and allow it to bloom / proof before adding to the dough
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alee
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 21, 2009 12:20 am    Post subject: active dry yeast - differences between brands Reply with quote

Hi! I've been looking for information about whether there are differences among different brands of active dry yeast. I noticed that someone here posted a question about an additive to Red Star ADY concerning Sorbian Monostearate. Does anyone know what the additive does and whether there are real differences between the different brands of ADY? Thanks in advance.
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Raymond
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 01, 2009 12:12 pm    Post subject: incorporating baker's yeast into biscuit making Reply with quote

Dear Sir

We are working on a biscuit receipe where we would like to mix the yeast (add to water first?) into the base ingredients, then the biscuits are being extruded via an extruder, dried, and then dry roasted.

Will the yeast cause the biscuits to rise or swell?
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jstape
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 14, 2009 10:19 pm    Post subject: yeast Reply with quote

Is there any way that I can find out if my dry yeast is still usable?
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1008
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Fri Aug 14, 2009 11:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

yup - very easy

small bowl of warm water, should not be so hot you cannot keep your finger in the water for many minutes.

add half a spoon of yeast. stir.

within 10-15 minutes you should see foaming. that shows the yeast is alive and well and producing CO2.

nothing but colored water, it's toast.

dry yeast, kept in the freezer, last several years.
expiration dates presume room temp storage - typically one year.
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Guest






PostPosted: Fri Sep 25, 2009 1:48 am    Post subject: "Instant" Yeast Reply with quote

I was under the impression that instant yeast and quick rising yeasts (like Fleischman's rapidrise) are completely different beasts. To my knowledge instant yeast is the same yeast as active dry yeast however it is dried under gentler conditions so as to preserve more of its potency. This is why you don't need to bloom instant yeast.

Quick rising yeasts are a genetically altered mutant form of regular yeast that has been bred to produce lots of CO2 very quickly ... however it also putters out sooner than regular yeast and therefore should not be used for long slow rises in the fridge. Because it is so active, quick rising yeasts also do not require blooming.

The former of these "instant" yeasts is usually only available at a commercial level, although you can find it in some stores or online in 1 pound bags.
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Jeffimus
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PostPosted: Tue Dec 08, 2009 1:14 am    Post subject: Active dry versus 1 lb. block Reply with quote

Help!

I've spent years working on duplicating a recipe that my late grandmother used to make (Italian Easter Bread). What I've done is taken a few different recipes that I found online, merged some of them together, asked my father (who did the shopping for her) what ingredients he used to buy, and use my memory of the taste and aroma to get it close.

My father told me that HIS father used to get fresh yeast from a bakery in that town for that bread. Since the recipes I found called for dry yeast, and since I was not able to find live yeast, I used the packages. I have just found a local bakery (I live on the opposite side of the country from my father) that sells live yeast in 1-lb blocks.

Since the recipe I came up with calls for 3 packages of dry yeast, how much of the live yeast should I use? Do I take that 1-lb block and cut it into a whole bunch of cakes?
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1008
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Tue Dec 08, 2009 1:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

here's a handy chart:

http://breaddaily.tripod.com/yeast.htm

many of the larger supermarkets do carry fresh yeast - it's usually in the refrigerated dairy section.

be careful with expiration / shelf life on fresh yeast - it does not hold nearly as long as the dry yeast.
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 08, 2010 4:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I love this site! I've been baking for years and didn't know dry yeast could be frozen.
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Alice Land
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 22, 2012 9:06 pm    Post subject: Proofing yeast: What does "proof" mean ? Reply with quote

What does "proofing" mean ? It means you put your teaspoon of yeast in a small amount (1/4 cup) of warm water (body temperature up to 104* F), stir it up, and let it sit 5 minutes.
This is to "prove" that the yeast is - alive. If you now see bubbling (CO2) you have "proven" your yeast is alive and you proceed with your recipe.
If no bubbles, you have "proven" that your yeast is - dead from old age or from heatstroke, or is in hibernation from extreme cold.
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Antilope



Joined: 03 Jan 2013
Posts: 11
Location: Sacramento, CA

PostPosted: Sat Jan 05, 2013 7:18 pm    Post subject: Yeast will last nearly forever in the freezer Reply with quote

...
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Tam
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 11, 2014 2:34 pm    Post subject: Yeast Reply with quote

Is yeast bad for Banting diets? I see all Banting ( no carb -grain ) breads are made with baking powder or soda, but non yeast....do u know why that would be? Thanks
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1008
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Mon Aug 11, 2014 8:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

probably because there's zero to ultra-little sugar in those grains.

yeast eats sugar and produces CO2.
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