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Equipment & Gear: Understanding Blender Specifications
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ParrotSlave



Joined: 08 Nov 2012
Posts: 2
Location: Houston, TX

PostPosted: Thu Nov 08, 2012 10:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If the glasses are so heavy that they're going to sink your nose into the nasal cavity, then I could understand going with plastic. Mine are -4.25 -50 x130 (right) and -3.75 -50 x035 (left) [sphere, cylinder, axis]. I have tried various plastic lenses several times, and what has driven me crazy is not chromatic aberration so much as the distortion at the edge of the visual field, which I find particularly disturbing when driving, especially at night. It's getting harder to find glass lenses, but I do note a Canadian company that still has high index ultra thin glass lenses that should work well in cases of extreme myopia: http://www.visionsofcanada.com/csi/awb/voc/high-myopia.asp. A separate problem is that the opticians tend to try and sell smaller lenses in glass, since they worry about the weight, and, unfortunately, when one is used to gigantic lenses, a shift in lens size can create difficulty in adjusting. I find myself still reverting to a 1996 pair of no-line trifocals with PhotoGray in Flexon frames--the best pair I ever had, also, coincidentally, the heaviest, and with the largest lenses. Opticians seem to have no understanding of physics as they try to "convert" me to the plastic religion.
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Jim Cooley



Joined: 09 Oct 2008
Posts: 366
Location: Seattle

PostPosted: Fri Nov 09, 2012 6:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fascinating! Thanks for the links.
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 14, 2014 12:54 am    Post subject: Max power Reply with quote

A correction to your statement about max/peak power. The maximum power of an electric motor occurs at 50% speed not right before stall. The maximum torque occurs at stall.
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JohnGalt
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PostPosted: Mon May 26, 2014 5:51 pm    Post subject: Boiling water in blenders. Reply with quote

I, personally, have started with room temperature water (70F) and brought it to boiling (212F) in a Blendtec. I used to sell them and I'm a tea drinker. No hotplates in the demo booth.
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Jeff
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PostPosted: Sun Aug 24, 2014 3:45 pm    Post subject: Blinder specifications Reply with quote

Why the discrepancy between stated hp and watts. If 1 hp = 746 watts, can you have a 1800 watt unit with 3 hp (ie. Cleanblend blinder)?
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1108
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Sun Aug 24, 2014 4:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

if you read the original article and some of the follow-up, you'll see that manufacturers play with numbers to make things look really good.

the three horsepower claim is most likely what is described as 'peak' hp - not much relationship to actual use.

'modern day' kitchens typically have 20 amp circuits in the kitchen, older homes perhaps 15 amps. you can figure the available wattage from there - something advertised as 3500 watts sounds good, but probably will trip breakers under (heavier) load.
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Jim Cooley



Joined: 09 Oct 2008
Posts: 366
Location: Seattle

PostPosted: Mon Aug 25, 2014 11:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

My friend was telling me his induction cooker (common here in India) is 1800 watts.
I would just kill to play around with that and a cast iron pan...
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Sandra
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 20, 2014 8:53 am    Post subject: RPM & Wattage Reply with quote

Can you work out the RPM of blenders from their wattage?
I'm thinking of the Ninja Nutri Blender QB3000NZ (132515) at 700Watts,
as against the Ninja Nutri Blender BL450(NZ) at 900 Watts.
I do understand there is a reduction in speed under load, and that bowl size also makes a difference, but thought average rpm might give a clue to
how fast they really are?
Thank you
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1108
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Sat Dec 20, 2014 4:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

it is not possible to calculate rpm from wattage. sorry.
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Lorraine
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 29, 2016 3:12 pm    Post subject: Watts vs Horsepower Reply with quote

great article. The article was very informative and the explanation was easy enough for a non engineer to understand.

thank you
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AdamBlends



Joined: 31 Mar 2016
Posts: 3

PostPosted: Thu Mar 31, 2016 8:42 pm    Post subject: An in-depth article about blender horsepower Reply with quote

I know I'm quite late to the party here, but I just posted an article discussing Vitamix horsepower that I thought you might be interested in. I measured input and output power (peak and sub-peak), and also wrote about how the power depends on what you are blending.
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1108
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Thu Mar 31, 2016 10:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

the proposed theory that the power of a device depends on what it is blending is,,,, well - a non-starter.

that one liquid or the other heats up faster does not mean it changes the power of a blender.
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AdamBlends



Joined: 31 Mar 2016
Posts: 3

PostPosted: Thu Mar 31, 2016 10:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It depends on what you mean by "the power of a blender." What I meant when I said "the power depends on what you are blending," is that both the input and output power depend on what is being blended. I am 100% certain of that.

If you take "power of a blender" to mean its peak power, then sure, that is an inherent property of the blender. (However, peak power is defined by a certain load...)
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holly
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 04, 2016 9:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Is RPM important? I am looking at a blender with 1200w but only 3000 rpm and one with 1000w but 25,000 rpm. I was surprised the rpm is so different when there is only a difference of 200w.
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AdamBlends



Joined: 31 Mar 2016
Posts: 3

PostPosted: Tue Apr 05, 2016 4:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

RPM is important, but I wouldn't use it as the main means to compare blenders. There isn't a standard for what manufacturers actually mean when they give you an RPM number. Sometimes it's a "bare motor" speed (which is the maximum speed of the motor, if it weren't connected to anything), and other times it's an actual operating speed. And even then, the RPM usually depends on what you are blending.

All that said, 3,000 RPM sounds super low for a 1200W blender. I think it's either a typo, or a different kind of machine.
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