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white truffle infused coddled eggs
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pbone



Joined: 05 Jan 2008
Posts: 99
Location: Dutchess County, NYS

PostPosted: Mon Oct 01, 2012 6:50 pm    Post subject: white truffle infused coddled eggs Reply with quote

A friend of mine came back from Paris , and I asked her to tell me about the most delicious meal she'd eaten. She described simple, soft boiled eggs that had been stored in rice with truffles, so the truffle flavor permeated the eggs through the shell! I decided to try a version of this with coddled eggs. Appallingly delicious! Here's exactly how I did it: lightly buttered the interior of the Royal Worcester egg coddler. Sprinkled a little salt in there and dripped about 3 drops of White Truffle Oil into the bottom. Carefully cracked and dropped one extra large egg on top of the oil. Added a couple more drops of oil, a shake of salt, and the second egg. A few more drops of oil and little shake of salt on top, then screwed on the top. Don't screw the top on too tightly. I suspended the egg coddler by the ring on a chopstick into a 2 quart pan of simmering water, set a cover on (loosely, over the chopstick) and set a timer for 8 minutes. After 8 mins, it wasn't done, so I screwed the top back on, covered and simmered it for another two minutes. Perfect, and so good I'd serve it to a prince! If you cook more than 2 eggs, say, 2 coddlers, four eggs, 2 chopsticks, the time will be increased, depends on size and temperature of eggs and number of coddlers and thickness of the porcelein. Nice thing about an egg coddler is that you can unscrew the top and check to see whether the eggs are done! I submerge them only to the top of the porceleine, not above the metal top, and I only let the water simmer, not boil fully. It's easy to lift out the coddlers by the chopstick and place them on a thick dishtowel for easy unscrewing by the metal rim, not the ring. I have a friend who has laying hens, so next time I will use lovely fresh eggs! The only other thing I might add to the eggs and truffle oil would be a little grated, good parmegiana reggiano cheese between the two eggs and on top. But the simple eggs and truffle oil and salt are exquisitely delicious! Et voila!!
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1012
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Mon Oct 01, 2012 7:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

tell me more . . . (g)

I got some "white truffle infused olive oil" for a Xmas present - nice stuff - exceedingly 'delicate' to 'non-existent' flavoring tho - I'm thinking the "pure" truffle oil is a big 'stronger'?

did I read that right . . . two eggs in one cup?
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pbone



Joined: 05 Jan 2008
Posts: 99
Location: Dutchess County, NYS

PostPosted: Mon Oct 01, 2012 8:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Royal Worchester makes egg coddlers in two sizes - the one called "king size" or "large" accommodates two extra large eggs (or, of course two large eggs). The smaller one, which I do not have, accommodates only one egg. I just spent a week on EBay acquiring 4 more egg coddlers! I got two for wedding presents 40 years ago. So now I can serve this delectible dish to six at a dinner party.))))

Re white truffle oil and white truffles - I first became familiar with the Italian white truffles when I lived in Italy, at which time I completely lost interest forever in the French black ones, which are interesting as texture but I don't think have much flavor or interest other than snob appeal. Certainly the white truffles have the stronger, more exhilarating flavor. But that's just me. I find white truffles and white truffle oil absolutely intoxicating. And yes, just a few drops go a long way. I use (at the moment) Bella Famiglia Imported White Truffle flavored Olive Oil at $14/100 ml, or 3.38 fl oz. It goes a long way, but the flavor de-intensifies over time, so, once you open the bottle, it is important to use it, before it goes a little bland. I dribble it on scrambled eggs, on toast with butter, and on pasta with parmigiana (and maybe garlic)...it goes especially well with cheese. On sliced steak! On a grilled cheese sandwich! Monini makes one that's a little cheaper and also good, but I think Bella Famiglia has the stronger flavor. You can do a load of research about white truffle oil, but as the truffle does not itself contain oil, it always has to be in some kind of oil. I generally use white truffle flavor-infused olive oil, but it's also made with grapeseed or safflower oil as well. I haven't tried these. Good luck! p.s. if you should ever find yourself in glorious possession of a fresh white truffle (available at various harvest times, I used to get them in NYC at Balducci's at Thanksgiving time - and I understand they grow them in Oregon now - whatever you do, DO NOT COOK THEM!!! Just shave them on top of whatever dish you want them on. Fine Italian restaurants actually do this at the table. If you cook them or put them in a sauce and cook the sauce, you will completely destroy them. I did that once. What an atrocious mistake to make with an $80 truffle:0 Finally, about truffle slicers: there are straight bladed ones, and scalloped ones. I find the straight ones better. The scalloped ones tend to chew up the truffle, while the straight edge is like a mandolin and makes a nice clean cut, miraculously thin (but adjustable) slices.
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pbone



Joined: 05 Jan 2008
Posts: 99
Location: Dutchess County, NYS

PostPosted: Mon Oct 01, 2012 9:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

One more thing about white truffles and white truffle flavor-infused oil: You say, Dilbert, that the flavor is "delicate to nonexistent"...the flavor of white truffle is experienced in large part as a heady, intoxicating SCENT! You experience it more in your nose and the back of your throat (and head) than on your tongue. It is also possible that yours, from Christmas, for heavens' sake, has lost its intensity over time. Depending on when you opened the bottle. Curiously, when the flavor has gone weak, it doesn't matter how many extra drops you use - the flavor will not increase; you'll just have an oilier dish.

The first time my husband wanted to surprise me with some white truffles (we were living in Milano) he stored them for a day or so in the glove compartment of the car. The whole car was FILLED with the extraordinarily pungent scent of the white truffles!!! It was almost overwhelming! That's why the "flavor" can permeate rice they are stored in, and the eggs stored in the rice, as my friend reported from Paris. White truffles are a truly unique experience. I hope you get to experience them fully! Now I am moved to try to find a truffle grower in Oregon to buy one, at least to test, to see if they're any good... if they are not insanely expensive.
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Jim Cooley



Joined: 09 Oct 2008
Posts: 325
Location: Seattle

PostPosted: Mon Oct 01, 2012 9:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

pbone, what a fun write-up! You've got me tempted to go buy egg coddlers and truffle oil.

Do you keep the truffle oil in the refrigerator? Does still loses it aroma at 34 F?
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pbone



Joined: 05 Jan 2008
Posts: 99
Location: Dutchess County, NYS

PostPosted: Mon Oct 01, 2012 10:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, Jim Cooley, I do keep it in the fridge, and I have one bottle almost empty, and another, unopened, in there right now. I read a while ago that the oil, if refrigerated, will retain more of its flavor - oh, and "aroma" is indeed a better word than "scent" - but I cannot answer with informed accuracy as to whether keeping it chilled helps retain the flavor...I just think it does. Btw, the unopened bottle has gone cloudy and has solidified a bit, but that won't matter; When I open it and get it to room temp, it will re-liquify and clarify.

Re the coddlers - just be sure however many you get that they are all the same size if you ever want to use them all together. The four I acquired from Ebay where, I confess, I am a stealth bidder who only bids when there is less than one minute left for bidding - Ebay will then bid you up by little increments until you are the high bidder, and no farther. towards your max bid, and you will win unless someone else has put in a higher maximum bid...but I digress...None of mine cost over $5, although shipping was a little steep - more than the cost of the coddler in all cases. I would recommend that you get the king-sized ones for two eggs in any case. You can always cook just one egg in there, but you can't stuff two eggs into the smaller sized ones))) Go for it! And good luck!
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
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Location: central PA

PostPosted: Tue Oct 02, 2012 6:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'll keep an eye out for small qtys - stuff that gets "used by the drop" would have a long 'shelf' life here - a 100 ml bottle would last a long long time and if it loses its punch, , , ,

I have a set of those metal top coddlers - but they are definitely of tthe "one egg" size
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pbone



Joined: 05 Jan 2008
Posts: 99
Location: Dutchess County, NYS

PostPosted: Tue Oct 02, 2012 7:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dilbert, dear! Maybe I should have said "drizzle" instead of drops. 3 1/2 oz (100 ml) is not a very big bottle...Monini sells an 8 oz bottle. Of course I should have said drizzle instead of drop and aroma instead of scent, but an egg coddler is a quite small, enclosed container that just holds two eggs exactly, so you only do want to put a couple of drops in bottom, over first egg and on top, or you'd have some pretty oily eggs! Drops or drizzles, what I mean to communicate is that you don't have to use much to achieve the desired result, which is that heady, intoxicating effect that truffles add to a plate of pasta or a scrambled egg! I hope you don't give up - I maintain that white truffles and/or white truffle oil is a uniquely ecstatic gastronomic experience! p.s. I would not give up on that Christmas bottle - just dump (oh, all right, drizzle, if you insist!) a couple of tablespoons onto al dente fettucini with some good parmigiana and salt and pepper and toss. The steaming fettuccini should deliver the aroma to your pleasure center!
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pbone



Joined: 05 Jan 2008
Posts: 99
Location: Dutchess County, NYS

PostPosted: Tue Oct 02, 2012 8:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

There's no reason why you couldn't do one egg, of course, w/ truffle oil! Just hang one or two of your one-egg coddlers suspended on a skewer or chopstick through the metal in simmering water and get ready to feel faint with ecstacy! I want you to try it and let me know what you think!
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1012
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Tue Oct 02, 2012 10:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Christmas bottle all gone (g)

I'll check for small sizes of "the real good stuff" . . .

I'm only going to give up when the undertaker sez' "He's full"
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pbone



Joined: 05 Jan 2008
Posts: 99
Location: Dutchess County, NYS

PostPosted: Tue Oct 02, 2012 10:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

LOL - Bella Famiglia is quite good and comes in small bottles. Once you get hooked, you'll also be inspired to experiment with different applications and brands. I like your philosophy! Ditto. Cheers! sp
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pbone



Joined: 05 Jan 2008
Posts: 99
Location: Dutchess County, NYS

PostPosted: Mon Oct 08, 2012 1:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello, truffle lovers: UPDATE: I used my friend's fresh eggs and, well, omg.
And I have to share a couple of new thoughts as to how to do it. First, I did use more than a drop or two of the white truffle oil. I used about a half teaspoon on the bottom, another between the two eggs, and another half teaspoon on the top. I believe it is important not NOT to fill the coddler to the very top. If you do, some of the precious truffle oil escapes into the simmering water, no matter how gently you simmer.

Confession: I did this for a late lunch w/ two large fresh eggs, well, actually they were different sized (those hens...) anyway, my first effort was so delicious, even though some of the oil leached into the simmering water, I immediatly did two more, not quite full to the top of the coddler...ecstasy. Go ahead, call me a truffle pig. I wish!)))) Don't forget the salt!
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Johnmoglas



Joined: 09 Oct 2012
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 09, 2012 11:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sounds delicious!! Big smile
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pbone



Joined: 05 Jan 2008
Posts: 99
Location: Dutchess County, NYS

PostPosted: Thu Jan 03, 2013 3:58 pm    Post subject: yet another last word on truffle oil Reply with quote

Here we have the NYT weighing in, and they sound ever so preciously knowledgeable. Here is a link to a recent, interesting article:

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/05/16/dining/16truf.html?pagewanted=all
Sorry, it's not blue and clickable, so copy and paste.

Dilbert, especially, I've been meaning to get back to you about your weakly scented Christmas present truffle oil (now used up). The article above will describe "chemically enhanced" v "pure" or "organic"(both virtually tasteless) truffle oil. I hasten to confess, though, that if you give me a chemical that tastes like a white truffle, I will eat it! I found myself with three kinds of so-called white truffle oil on hand, and I've also bought Monini. Monini is pretty tasty. It is my second choice. The two that claimed to be organic had virtually no truffle flavor at all; they were a pleasant light oil. Most bombastic about how pure it was, Jack Czarnecki's Oregon White Truffle Oil had not a hint of truffle flavor. Over-priced, imho, at $25/5oz. Tsk, tsk! Then, equally tasteless (except for a nice light olive oil quality), but less expansively self-congratulatory is Sabatino Tartufi, at about $20/3.4 oz or 100 ml.

And now for the good news. To absorb it, and to benefit from it, you might have to relax your standards with regard to "organic" and "pure". Do it in the name of science! Bella Famiglia Imported White Truffle flavored Olive Oil, product of Italy, costs $12.49/100 ml - (3.36 oz) and according to the Times article (which virtuously avoids naming any oils that actually replicate the white truffle experience), it must be pure chemical flavor dumped into olive oil. So be it. It actually tastes like white truffles, makes those good truffle infused eggs I'm ravin' about, is a good drizzle for meats or eggs or pasta with cheese...

My final comment (for the nonce) is this: It seems we have a choice: fake, chemical, heady, tasty imitation stuff versus The Emperor's New Clothes! Can't wait to hear back from some of you, especially those of you who threw caution to the winds and settled down to enjoy some tasty chem-juice. LOL.
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1012
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2013 5:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

that's certainly a provoking article on the truffle taste / oil 'debate.'

I got introduced to 'the power of truffles' during an extended stay in Turin / Piedmont - quite frankly, no I can't say if I was munching on a beaker product or 'the real thing' - the variety of dishes were simply described as 'with truffle (oil)'

which brings up the rather interesting point.... if it walks like a duck, quacks like a duck, and tastes like a duck, is it a duck?

the use of 'artificial flavors and coloring' is hardly new news. and making the bold assumption that the artificial bit is not harmful to your health (which btw also brings up the question of is the 'natural' stuff not harmful....) seems the 'better living / eating through chemistry' is not much more than replicating the natural compounds. eh? both ethyl and methyl alcohol are naturally produced, and have similar results when ingested, but they are not both safe to consume . . .

which brings up ye olde 'organic' debate. there are raging debates / studies that organic is more/less nutritious / better tasting / better for you. for decades I've gardened organically - my take on the topic - better tasting - probably yes. prior to 'big ag' getting on the organic bandwagon, organic stuff is much more local, and more local translates to fresher, and fresher tends to translate to better taste. note the absence of "it's not organic but it is fresh" - where does that fit in? the more nutritious debate has 'studies' on both sides - but I would say organic growers pay more attention to the soil and growing conditions than the commercial approach of 'toss on another couple pounds of nitrogen' - the "better soil/growing conditions" could easily explain the "better nutrition." my personal stance on organic is not what is on/in organic products, it is much more a question of what is _not_ in/on organic products - that makes the difference.

now, there's not a lot of faking when the server hand shaves a black truffle over the dish at the table... not personally seen that event with a white truffle. so other than to have experienced "dang that's good" - I'm pretty much in the dark when it comes to white/black truffle oil.

the 'get it out of the kitchen' reminds me of the MSG debate. most MSG today is artificially produced based on replicating a natural product. indeed, some individuals are more sensitive to MSG adverse effects that others - peanuts will kill some humans, I eat peanuts all the time .... there's also not much question that MSG is a 'flavor enhancer' - so if one uses a natural based MSG, does that make a superior dish to an 'artificial' MSG?
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