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Equipment & Gear: Cutting Boards
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engineer's wife
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 12, 2010 10:06 pm    Post subject: Sanalite cutting board? Any advice? Reply with quote

After reading your forum discussion I did a web search to find cutting board options and found the following. Would like to know if any regulars on this forum have tried this kind of cutting board and how you think it compares to wood or other surfaces. Link:
http://www.polyzone.com/asp/Product.asp?PG=2186
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1001
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Fri Feb 12, 2010 11:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

according to the manufacturer, it's high density polyethylene.

nothing too special, "premium," [whatever] about it.

HDPE is easy on knife edges, cuts, nicks, warps, holds bacteria in the cuts. but goes in the dishwasher.
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LB
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 21, 2010 6:00 am    Post subject: Kitchen surfaces Reply with quote

I hail from a long line of butchers, bakers, cooks, teachers, candy makers, and artists. OMG, I can not fathom cutting on any glass surface! YIKES! It totally frightens me! (Chips, scratches, breakage..!) I use granite/marble slab for candy and rolling out pasty; butcher block for kneading breads, pasta mixing, cookies, making sandwiches, cleaning vegies, light cutting, prepping, and cooling pies Smile BUT for cutting meats I always use a med sized "EPICUREAN!" cutting board. It's very hard surface is friendly to knives and is dishwasher safe.. I do not hesitate to put mine in the sanitization cycle of my dishwasher. It is available in comfortable colors, does not stain, does not slip, tolerates bleach, and is made in the U.S.A.!!! (One of the very best features!!!) Smile
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1619
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Sun Mar 21, 2010 6:13 am    Post subject: Re: Kitchen surfaces Reply with quote

LB wrote:
BUT for cutting meats I always use a med sized "EPICUREAN!" cutting board. It's very hard surface is friendly to knives and is dishwasher safe.. I do not hesitate to put mine in the sanitization cycle of my dishwasher. It is available in comfortable colors, does not stain, does not slip, tolerates bleach, and is made in the U.S.A.!!! (One of the very best features!!!) Smile

For the last 9 months I have been cutting on nothing but Epicurean boards - and I have to say they are my favorite cutting boards now. Relatively lightweight, easy to wash (hand wash or machine), fast to cut on, and doesn't wear down the edge of my blade.
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Amanda
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 09, 2010 7:49 pm    Post subject: Re: Storing my board Reply with quote

Anonymous wrote:
So, I just bought a 3 -1/2" thick maple end grain board. I wanted something tall to keep better posture. Bad Back. Anyway, the manufacturer's web site says that I should not store my board flat on the counter (no air flow). Really? That's a bummer. I'd like to keep it on my counter top, but now I'm worried. Anyone have any experience in this matter. Recommendations? Thanks.


You could put "feet" on the bottom of your board so that it can breath.
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mikeymike
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 24, 2010 11:25 pm    Post subject: Very Helpful Reply with quote

Thank you for the very helpful site. Much appreciated!
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Tur211
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 24, 2010 7:11 pm    Post subject: Types of boards Reply with quote

I was wondering, what would be the best board- I know that you said maple was the best, but can you please specify what kind of maple? Also, what is the difference between a maple butchers block and a regular maple cutting board? Thx.
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1001
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Sat Jul 24, 2010 8:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

"sugar maple" is the usual culprit - but be aware it has many 'common' names that vary by locale. another is 'rock maple'

"butcher block" style is traditionally defined to mean that the grain of the wood is vertical - not hard to spot because the cutting board looks like a lot of little blocks glued together (akin to a checker board pattern) and it's rather thick - 2 inches or more.

less expensive maple cutting boards use 'boards' where the grain runs horizontal. they are typically thinner than butcher block construction.
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 11, 2010 1:07 pm    Post subject: cutting boards Reply with quote

I have a large cutting board made from recycled cedar. Every week it is scrubbed and then heavily salted while wet and left to dry overnight with the salt on. Next morning, the salt is wiped off and the wood is oiled. I figure that should cover any bacteria contingencies. The board is 10 years old now and still in excellent condition.


cheers
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Jim Cooley



Joined: 09 Oct 2008
Posts: 314
Location: Seattle

PostPosted: Sun Dec 26, 2010 7:52 pm    Post subject: Re: Wood Cutting Boards Reply with quote

Edited by Cooking For Engineers: The first part of this message was in response to a spam comment that has since been removed.

I've also begun to suspect that a wet (wooden) cutting board is easier on my knives than a dry one. Anyone else noticed this?[/b]
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1619
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Mon Dec 27, 2010 5:48 am    Post subject: Re: Wood Cutting Boards Reply with quote

Jim Cooley wrote:
I've also begun to suspect that a wet (wooden) cutting board is easier on my knives than a dry one. Anyone else noticed this?[/b]

I think that is true. Certainly, I've found a wet board to be much softer than a dry one, but it also tends to be "slower" (my knives don't glide as rapidly over the surface).
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tkjtkj
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PostPosted: Sun Dec 25, 2011 5:42 am    Post subject: Why not discuss 'cutting mats' ? Reply with quote

Flexible cutting mats are very good and multi-purpose, too: they can be rolled up to act as a funnel, fascillitating transfer of the food to a container or cooking pan.
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Geeman
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 04, 2012 4:42 am    Post subject: Beware of the Epicurean boards !!!! Reply with quote

Hi,
I am alarmed at the amount of positive regard for the Epicurean boards.

I will not use mine. Why?:

I came accross this product which was glistening with Eco and ethical credentials, in addition to the claim that they are anti-bacterial...
I bought one because of these overtly wonderful claims. The instructions indicated to wash prior to use, and warned that once wet, the board would smell somewhat. The instructions stated that this would not last long and the smell would soon fade.

I attempted to wash the board. As soon as it was wetted, I noticed a very distinct smell that I recalled from my childhood - the smell of Bakerlite (spelling incorrect?). This stuff was used in decades previous in plastic-like products and powerboards etc.

I searched the manufacturers website and found out IN ONE TINY OBSCURE SECTION that they use Formaldehyde to help set the resin as per products such as Bakerlite etc. No wonder nothing will grow on it!

If memory serves, the company appears to be diversifying from skate ramp manufacture into the chopping board market.

It claimed that the levels of Formaldahyde were at safe levels (food grade Formaldehyde).
I researched very breifly but beyond the website and found that claims as to safe levels of formadehyde are controversial.

I encourage you do the research!!!!!

If I can smell Bakerlite, formaldehyde is going to be in the food I eat. I do not want to consume Formaldehyde. I understand it is in every household (e.g. wall paint etc.). I also have to breathe other persons' cigarette smoke at times, but would not choose to smoke the stuff myself.

Beware a company's obligation to improve it's bottom line. Time and time again, we find that decisions of organisations are not made with public health in mind despite the potential effects on public health. For example, I vaguely recall some information that "sensitive individuals" may have allergic or asthmatic reactions to Formaldehyde even at food grade levels. My daughter is asthmatic, but the "Epicurean"s mentioned nil cautions on their labelling. I am sure they know that identifying their product as containing toxic substances would generate zero sales. I am also sure that this chemical is most probably used in many other products including chopping boards. That is why I will not buy Chinese made, glued boards.

I make no claims as to the accuracy of my statements. I only looked at this site to see if I need tto oil a huon pine cutting board (single board, anti-bacterial properties). I encourage others to do the research for themselves. You ARE on your own!
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Kralingen
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PostPosted: Sun May 13, 2012 1:51 pm    Post subject: Glass boards Reply with quote

I have two glass cutting boards. I think they do a great job. Only downside is they are loud when cutting on them. Certainly no chance of the knife scarring the board and creating places for bacteria to hide.

Also, a solution if your board is bigger than your sink: soak half at a time - I stand my biggest board up in the sink so half of it is immersied. Let that soak, scrub it and flip the board over to do the other side.
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NathanielB



Joined: 11 Jan 2013
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Fri Jan 11, 2013 11:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for all the information, I only have one cutting board at the moment, but after reading this article I think I will have to go out and buy a few more Smile
Thanks, Nath
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