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Kitchen Notes: Making Butter
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1008
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Wed Jan 26, 2011 12:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

butter taste/smell can be influenced by the cow's feed/pasture/forage....
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PaulB
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 24, 2011 5:07 pm    Post subject: Attempts so far! Reply with quote

I have had 2 attempts at butter making using double cream (UK) near it's sell by date! The first attempt seemed to go well but I used too high a speed on my mixer and after 30 minutes had a very glossy fairly thick cream whizzing around the bowl leaving no residue on the sides! I think any buttermilk had been mixed back into the butter. I did not see 'butter globules' appear at any stage, I even left it out overnight and tried again in the morning to no avail and abandoned the plan.
For my second attempt, I left the cream out for a day and a half, gave it a quick whizz with a hand held blender then put it in a jar and shook, never got too much separated buttermilk which may have reabsorbed a bit, anyway proceeded to washing stage and got plenty of milky water back out, put it in a bowl in the fridge. I then tried adding salt to a small sample but found a lot of liquid coming out of the 'butter' is this wet butter simply solved by continuing to knead and pouring off the excess liquid, I did 'dry' the butter with kitchen tissue?
Should I stop shaking as soon as the thick cream appears in the jar, pour of any buttermilk, shake again and keep getting the buttermilk out? Once washed, shouls I gain keep kneading until as much moisture as possible is out? Thanks

Paul
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tkrusty
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PostPosted: Tue May 24, 2011 3:23 pm    Post subject: Making butter and cheese Reply with quote

Years ago in the 1970's , when my kids were growing up. Ihad 2 milk cows and milked 2 ties a day. I had so much milk I would refrigerate for a day and skim off the cream. What ever milk was left we drank, made cheese and raised a couple of pigs on the rest.

Making butter was easy, I had a butter churn, but also used a gallon glass jar. Fill the jar about 2/3rd's full and let it warm to room temp. Then in the evening while watching TV we would put the jar on the floor and roll it back and forth with our feet. We had butter in about 10 minutes. Don't try to churn cold cream because it takes too long. we would wash it and salt it, cool it and cut into pieces and wrap in wax paper and freeze. Lasted a long time.

Cheese was another product we made. I had a 5 gallon pot and heated the milk and put in the rennet and ended up with curds and whey. washed the curds and made several kinds of cheese. Fed the whey to the pigs along with the extra milk.

Those pigs loved it. and after they were grown, they make the best pork chops, ham, and bacon.
Those days are gone now. No one knows how to do it anymore.
Thanks for reading my long dissertation.
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stratfanrick
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 07, 2011 8:41 pm    Post subject: making butter Reply with quote

I made butter from cold whipping cream directly out of the fridge... poured a quart in a large bowl and used my mixer to whip it till it turned to butter and liquid buttermilk. I poured off the buttermilk, washed out the excess as directed, and got delicious butter that tastes almost like store-bought unsalted butter but better. It did take about 20 minutes of mixing, but it was perfect my first try; absolutely foolproof! My wife works at a corporate dairy and we get all the free whipping cream we can use from their lab sampling; doubt I'll buy butter again!
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Jim Cooley



Joined: 09 Oct 2008
Posts: 316
Location: Seattle

PostPosted: Thu Sep 08, 2011 1:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Twenty minutes! Try chilling the bowl and beaters first. Shouldn't take nearly that long.

I agree, it's tasty stuff.
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Gib
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 11, 2011 12:28 pm    Post subject: butter making variables Reply with quote

I just found this site and love the concept. I have a cow and not much to do with cream except make butter. I save it up in the freezer and then spend a day making butter every month or so. I use a simple butter churn which is basically a paddle on a motor that fastens to the top of a gallon jar. My question is why does the butter coagulate quickly sometimes and other times it never seems to transition from the soft peaks stage? I assume temperature is a factor but I haven't figured out what is the ideal. I have also heard that other weather conditions can make a difference. Atmospheric pressure? I have never seen the science behind this.
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Josefinie
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 29, 2012 10:55 pm    Post subject: Thank you for your directions Reply with quote

Just wanted some direction for making butter, perfect step by step directions. Thank you. Can't wait to make it again and add herbs and other ingredients.
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jhmd@earthlink.net
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 02, 2012 2:36 am    Post subject: making butter Reply with quote

The first time I visited this site I read EVERY SINGLE post. I was surprised there was no mention of ghee which is a form of butter with all but the fat removed creating a product that has a longer shelf life used in countries with less refrigeration capability. It might be useful for the people who made butter that had a sour or off taste. This following information was found on Wikipedia after typing "ghee" into Google:

To prepare ghee, butter is melted in a pot over medium heat. The butter begins to melt, forming a white froth on top. It is then simmered stirring occasionally and the froth reduces slowly and the color of the butter changes to pale yellow. Then it is cooked on low heat until it turns golden. The residue settles at the bottom and the ghee, which is now clear, golden,translucent and fragrant, is ready. The ghee is then filtered and it solidifies when completely cool.[1] Ghee has a long shelf-life and needs no refrigeration if kept in an airtight container to prevent oxidation. The texture, color and taste of ghee depends on the source of the milk obtained and the duration of boiling.
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1008
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Fri Nov 02, 2012 4:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

>> I read EVERY SINGLE post.

oops.
try "clarified butter" or search on ghee

Dec 16, 2006
http://www.cookingforengineers.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=931
Aug 25, 2005
http://www.cookingforengineers.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=149
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2013 12:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Can you use gold to make butter? Because in Minecraft gold looks like butter Big smile .
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 13, 2013 7:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote Delete this post

In my area we have a supply of fresh milk and cream from a local dairy -- this is not pasturized -- the kind of milk I grew up with as a kid -- I pay 5.00 for a gal of milk and 6.00 for a qt of cream -- many areas in the US allow farmers/dairy to sell products at the farm that are unpastuized or processed. Do a google hunt - you usually have to go to the farm.. we also have a local dairy that sells in the local area slow process pasturized products- both kinds make great butter ... you can also check at local farmers markets, substainability groups, or organic farming groups for milk and other things ...
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