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Kitchen Notes: Brining
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1639
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Thu Jun 30, 2011 5:27 am    Post subject: Re: how long can you keep brine meat before cooking Reply with quote

maf wrote:
I just need to know how long can you keep the chicken breast after brining?
In other words can you brine at night for 2 hours, wash and refrigerate to cook the next day? Can you freeze brine meat?

As long as you brined at refrigerator temperatures, you can treat the brined chicken as if it had been in the refrigerator that whole time. So, if it's a fresh piece, then definitely, after rinsing, you can store in the refrigerator or freeze as you would normally.
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sanha
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PostPosted: Sat Oct 29, 2011 11:51 pm    Post subject: Brining a boned turkey than stuffing it Reply with quote

I will be deboning my turkey for Thanksgiving this year. I would like to brine a 14 lb. boned turkey overnight. Then I'd like to stuff it with an oyster stuffing. Do you think that will make the turkey moist and juicy, while not causing the stuffing to be too salty?
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1639
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Sun Oct 30, 2011 12:05 am    Post subject: Re: Brining a boned turkey than stuffing it Reply with quote

sanha wrote:
I will be deboning my turkey for Thanksgiving this year. I would like to brine a 14 lb. boned turkey overnight. Then I'd like to stuff it with an oyster stuffing. Do you think that will make the turkey moist and juicy, while not causing the stuffing to be too salty?

Rinse the bird after brining to remove surface salt. The salt in the turkey meat from the brining shouldn't leach out into the stuffing. I'd also encourage you to cook the stuffing separately for best results - turkeys with stuffing are often either overcooked to ensure food safety or the stuffing end up undercooked when the turkey is done cooking.
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Jim MacK
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 23, 2011 1:58 pm    Post subject: Brining Water/Salt added Turkeys (Frozen Butterball) Reply with quote

I'd like to brine a thawed 24 lb. turkey that has water and salt listed as being added. My reason for brining is to use apple and orange juices with brown sugar and some salt as the brine to infuse some extra flavor.

If I reduce the salt content of the brine will the fruit and sugar get into the meat? Thanks for any help
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MistyC
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 25, 2012 5:59 pm    Post subject: using sugar in the brine Reply with quote

Why do brining recipes usually include some type of sugary base? What is the purpose of sugar in the brining process? Is sugar necessary?
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yocona



Joined: 18 Mar 2011
Posts: 47

PostPosted: Sat Feb 25, 2012 10:12 pm    Post subject: Re: using sugar in the brine Reply with quote

MistyC wrote:
Why do brining recipes usually include some type of sugary base? What is the purpose of sugar in the brining process? Is sugar necessary?

No, it isn't necessary. It is mostly for flavor, and only contributes marginally to the denaturing process.
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leandrokoiti



Joined: 18 Mar 2012
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Sun Mar 18, 2012 12:58 am    Post subject: great explanation! Reply with quote

finally a decent explanation about how and why brinning works, I never bought the simple osmosis explanation mostly because it would work the opposite as it really works, great post thanks a lot for sharing such great thoughts =D
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Mark R
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 29, 2014 12:15 am    Post subject: Brining Reply with quote

Oh dear! an engineer's website and we have cups per gallon......would any of you real engineers have specified a brine like that? It really is easy to do percentage, so at least we people in the rest of the world who use the SI system can do a quick and easy calculation - 5% say means 50 gms per litre.
While we are not trying to land on Mars with this stuff, the SI units, or at least percentage, means easy calculation and no mistakes.
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1639
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Sat Apr 05, 2014 5:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, sorry! This article was written ten years ago and somewhere around 8 years ago I thought I switched everything to show mass when appropriate, but obviously missed some articles. 1/2 cup salt per gallon is around a 4% brine solution or 40 g salt per liter. I'll update the article the next time I do a content update pass.
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Guest






PostPosted: Sun Sep 21, 2014 1:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Years ago, I met a woman that had a big gallon jar in her frig. full of pickle juices. All month long she would pour her left over pickle juices into this jar. It didnt matter what kind of pickle juice, sweet, dill, bread and butter, ect. At the end of the month she would take it out and boil it on the stove then add all different types of veggies to it and put it in jars and put it in the ref. crunchy pickled veggies was the results. Very good.
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Anna
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 12, 2015 10:54 pm    Post subject: Brining Reply with quote

Thanks for this enlightening discussion! About a year ago I brined a chicken and while it came out absolutely great (juicy, flavourful, the skin delicious) it was just a tad too salty. A tad. I put it down to the fact that the chicken was on the puny side, perhaps 800g. Unfortunately I don't remember where I found the recipe/instructions so I can't make the necessary adjustments. I do remember that the brining time was 8 hours, after which time the chicken was to be washed in plenty of cold water and dried inside and out. And then put in the fridge uncovered for 12 hours to dry thoroughly. It turned out kind of leathery, yet I think this drying out period is an essential part of the process. What I don't remember is the salinity of the brining liquid (only that the website was an American one so the measurements were in the unfamiliar cups and quarts). By the way, I dissolved the salt in boiling water because I'd added orange peel, peppercorns, fresh rosemary and other things and figured, rightly or wrongly, that the hot water would release the aromatic oils (and flavour the chicken). But one wonders about the widow of error: too much brining (resulting in saltiness), too little or short a brining (resulting in ineffectiveness). Someone here mentioned that he uses brining liquid that's slightly less salty than seawater and brines his turkey for 24 hours. So perhaps I should try 3% (30g salt to the litre) and brine my puny chickens for 8-10 hours. Or go for 4% and brine them for, say, 4 hours. Any thoughts?
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1050
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Tue Jan 13, 2015 3:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

....unfamiliar cups and quarts

there is yet another problem - "salt" when measured by volume - cups, tablespoons, etc - has a different weight/mass depending on its grind and 'structure'

"table salt" - the stuff fine enough to go through small holes of the typical salt shaker - is approx. 304 grams per "cup"
(=8 fluid ounces=16 tablespoons=236.6 ml)

however "kosher" salt - more typically used in meat preparation - weighs about 248 grams per cup (Mortons brand) but Diamond Crystal kosher salt is more like 180 grams per cup.

and a flaked sea salt is even less at 133 grams per cup.....

you probably don't have those brands, so the % by weight is a much better approach - if one can sleuth out what "kind" of salt the recipe author is using....
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