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Recipe File: Campbell's Green Bean Casserole
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Just Wondering
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PostPosted: Tue May 24, 2011 10:51 pm    Post subject: Add Chicken? Reply with quote

Can you use the exact recipe but add chicken (presumably pre-cooked?) Just wondering...
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Sherritasworld
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PostPosted: Fri May 27, 2011 9:40 pm    Post subject: Response to recipe list site Reply with quote

Michael Chu wrote:
I found this via Google:
http://www.thatsmyhome.com/slowcooker/green-bean-casserole.htm


What a wonderful site! Thank you!
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Mickey
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 02, 2011 9:14 pm    Post subject: Green Bean Caserole Reply with quote

Instead of French onions use stove top stuffing mix. Works and tastes great!
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Connie
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 17, 2011 9:55 pm    Post subject: Cheesy Green Bean Casserole Reply with quote

I have a different spin on this classic recipe. Instead of using Cream of Mushroom soup, I use Campbell's Cream of Chicken Soup and also added some shredded SMOKED Gouda cheese and a little bit of freshly grated parmesan or romano cheese in the recipe. Absolutely delicious. And I mix the ingredients the day before in the pan. All that needs to be done the day of is cook it for 30 minutes (till bubbly) then take out of the oven and add the remaining fried onions and put back in the oven for another five minutes or so. Wonderful.
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Sue NC
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 21, 2011 12:10 am    Post subject: Refridgerate Reply with quote

If I mix it together tonight and refridgerate, how long should I cook it for in the morning before work? and at what temp?
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guest
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PostPosted: Wed May 30, 2012 12:34 am    Post subject: IEEE standard Green Bean Cassarole Reply with quote

The original 1950's Campbell's test kitchen recipe called for soy sauce... This may actually fix it for those who don't like mushrooms... it's quite good, really!

In any case the result doesn't taste like canned mushroom soup.

Also, I was learning to do deep-fried battered onion rings, and came up with something a lot like the French's product:

1 Onion, sliced thin on mandolin slicer
1/2 cup self-rising cornmeal
1 egg- optional
1/4 cup milk- adjust to be a little thicker than pancake batter
1/2 tsp baking powder
Seasoned salt, hot sauce, season to taste

I put the onion slices in the batter, then heat the fry oil to 375 degrees. I used a carving fork to drop a few onion rings at a time into the oil, and then made sure they didn't clump up... this was avoids a doughy mess. For the same reason I fried in small batches and ran several of them.

I fried for 3 minutes at 375 degrees, drain, and put into a large bowl with 4 layers of paper towels on the bottom and let them dry until the bean and soup mix was ready to go.

I have not tried baking the rings after frying; this might improve them. Otherwise they come out somewhat oily. They taste much better, however!

Best of luck with this!
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guest
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 20, 2012 1:27 am    Post subject: green bean cassarole Reply with quote

Can I make this casssarole the day before, keep in refrigerator and bake the following day?
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1008
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Thu Dec 20, 2012 1:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

>>make ahead

basically yes - not sure why tho if you're not baking it ahead - it sure does not take long to mix up
if you fridge it without baking, I'd hold back on the onions tho - overnight they may go a bit soggy.

make & bake / fridge / reheat is also fine - it reheats well.
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phyllisnsf@aol.com
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 19, 2013 7:31 pm    Post subject: green bean cassarole Reply with quote

Unsure Help!!!!!!
I am making green bean cassarole for a group of 10 to 12 people. Do I double the reciple on the onion can? Also, what size baking pan do I need? Was thinking of one of those disposible aluminum pans, but no idea what size to buy. (I don't do much cooking!)[/b]
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1008
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Wed Nov 20, 2013 12:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

just double all the ingredients.

for the pan, double the square inches - i.e. length X width

10-15% more or less will not make a difference.
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1622
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Wed Nov 20, 2013 1:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

In case Dilbert's comment regarding doubling the square inches wasn't perfectly clear, what he means is to multiple length and width of the original pan, then double that value and find another pan whose length and width is approximately the same as the doubled value.

For example, in this recipe, we used an 8x8-in baking pan which has a surface area of 8 x 8 = 64 sq in. If we double the recipe, we'll need a pan that is double 64 sq in which is 128 sq in. The closest common baking pan with 128 sq in area is the 9x13 baking pan which has 117 length times width which is within 10% error of the theoretical 128 sq in pan. The resulting casserole will be ever so slightly thicker than if you made two 8x8-in casseroles due to the smaller proportional surface area, but it's close enough no one will notice. Also, 9x13-in pans aren't actually 9x13-in and 8x8-in aren't 8x8 in either... there's a lot of manufacturing variation between brands and designs, so all this is rough but definitely close enough for our needs.

So, long story short - when doubling, just use a 9x13-in pan or any other pan that has length x width value somewhere around 115 to 140. So, if an 11x11 exists, you can use that. Or a 12-in round casserole. Or...
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sxymamalette
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 28, 2013 3:40 pm    Post subject: green bean casserole toaster oven style Reply with quote

Big smile okay so important attempting to make a green bean casserole for thanksgiving i have all the required ingredients except my pan is not 8' and the timer is broken so as i sit here and babysit this dish with me luck that it turns out to be a success and not a green bean monstrosity Smile happy thanksgiving to everyone
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1008
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Thu Nov 28, 2013 5:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

>>pan isn't . . .

anything close will do - unless you used fresh green beans, everything in the assembled dish is already cooked - it's a heat'em up job - so the timing isn't super critical either!
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llsweares
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PostPosted: Tue Dec 17, 2013 2:26 am    Post subject: green bean casserole Reply with quote

Hello I have to make green bean casserole for about 25 people and was wondering how much stuff do I use to make this without over doubling it??
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1622
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Tue Dec 17, 2013 10:00 am    Post subject: Re: green bean casserole Reply with quote

llsweares wrote:
Hello I have to make green bean casserole for about 25 people and was wondering how much stuff do I use to make this without over doubling it??

As long as you have a pan large enough so the surface area increases by close to the number of times you multiplied the recipe, it should work. For example, if you need to quadruple the recipe, then you should try to find a pan that 4 times the surface area of the 8x8 pan this recipe calls for. That way the depth of the casserole will be roughly the same and cooking time will not be that different. In addition, since the quantity of french fried onions for covering the top will be quadrupled, then if the surface area is also quadrupled then the thickness of the onion layer will be the same. If your pan shape is such that the surface area is smaller, then you'll have a taller casserole and need less onions to cover the top and vice versa.

So, what's a good quadrupling pan size? Well, the 8x8 is approximately 64 square inches surface area so we're looking for something around 256 sq in (practically anything around 230-280 should be close enough). Two 9x13 pans will work as well as 4 8x8 (obviously), but I'm guessing from your question you want it to fit in one pan. One convenient size is the full size steam table pan which comes in disposable aluminum pans which typically have sloped sides which makes surface area calculation a little harder. One example I found listed both the top and bottom dimensions, so I split the difference for each dimension and multiplied them together and got 224 sq in which is probably close enough to yield a decent casserole. Only thing left to check is if the pan will fit your oven. In most cases, a full size steam pan will fit a 30-in home oven (even the shallower in-wall/cabinet variety).
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