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Recipe File: Turkey or Chicken Stock
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 24, 2010 6:11 am    Post subject: How long to cook stock Reply with quote

I have Turkey stock simmering in a 20 qt. stockpot and chicken stock in a 24 qt. I followed the normal ratios for stock. How long should I let it simmer. thx Happy Thanksgiving to all!!!!
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1626
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Wed Nov 24, 2010 6:15 am    Post subject: Re: How long to cook stock Reply with quote

Anonymous wrote:
I have Turkey stock simmering in a 20 qt. stockpot and chicken stock in a 24 qt. I followed the normal ratios for stock. How long should I let it simmer. thx Happy Thanksgiving to all!!!!

How much time do you have? The longer the duration, the more collagen you will be able to convert into gelatin and add richness to your stock. If you have 8 hours, I would let it simmer for 8 hours. After that, I don't think you'll be able to extract much more.
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 30, 2010 3:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Is it safe to cook the stock for two + days in a crock pot? I didn't do this, but my boyfriend did and now we have 4 quarts of stock in the fridge.

Thanks
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 04, 2010 9:33 pm    Post subject: Turkey broth' Reply with quote

Had no room in the fridge for a big pot, so I covered the pot and stuck it in the snow. Worked great!!!
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 04, 2011 2:47 am    Post subject: poultry stock Reply with quote

Can you use parts of chicken and poultry carcasses together to make stock?
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 04, 2011 6:37 am    Post subject: last message mistake- poultry stock Reply with quote

I meant to ask if it works to use parts of chicken and turkey together in a stock. I have some of each, but not enough of either one to make much stock individually.
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1012
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Fri Mar 04, 2011 7:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

in a word, yes - they can be mixed.

I rather suspect one would be hard pressed to taste a distinction between "pure" and "mixed - especially if it is used as a base for another dish.
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Suanie
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 18, 2011 3:34 pm    Post subject: Note of thanks Reply with quote

... for this recipe. I first used it for making chicken noodle soup, then I just used it again to make proper chicken stock. Followed your amount of ingredients etc, don't think I got even 1 gallon though. But it's definitely a good recipe.
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Isabel
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 15, 2011 10:31 pm    Post subject: Make Pre-measured frozen "stock muffins" Reply with quote

PLEASE don't heat up plastic. It leaches chemicals--no doubt about it. Instead of pouring warm stock in plastic bags, here is a better and more convenient way: Pour half cup portions into stainless steel muffin pans and then freeze. That way, you'll have pre-measured portions for later use. Put the frozen "stock muffins" in a plastic freezer bag.

As far as putting a frozen plastic bottle in hot stock to cool it down... DON'T! Just let it cool and then put in fridge:

http://health.usnews.com/usnews/health/healthday/080130/heating-plastic-bottles-releases-potentially-harmful-chemical.htm
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1626
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Thu Jun 16, 2011 4:05 pm    Post subject: Re: Make Pre-measured frozen "stock muffins" Reply with quote

Isabel wrote:
PLEASE don't heat up plastic. It leaches chemicals--no doubt about it. Instead of pouring warm stock in plastic bags, here is a better and more convenient way: Pour half cup portions into stainless steel muffin pans and then freeze. That way, you'll have pre-measured portions for later use. Put the frozen "stock muffins" in a plastic freezer bag.

As far as putting a frozen plastic bottle in hot stock to cool it down... DON'T! Just let it cool and then put in fridge:

http://health.usnews.com/usnews/health/healthday/080130/heating-plastic-bottles-releases-potentially-harmful-chemical.htm

I have to agree. This article was originally written many years ago and using water bottles is now not a recommended way to shock down stock.
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Richard M.
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 23, 2011 6:53 pm    Post subject: chilling center of stock without plastic Reply with quote

As an alternative to a plastic bottle, I just put a small stainless steel mixing bowl, about half-full of ice water, in the center of the stock pot, as it cooled down in the exterior ice water bath in the sink. I considered using a tall glass, but decided not to since I wasn't sure if my glasses were thermal shock-resistant, and I didn't want it to break in my soup. One of those tall metal cups like those used by ice-cream restaurants for milkshakes might also work.
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Dickiedog



Joined: 25 Nov 2011
Posts: 1
Location: United States

PostPosted: Fri Nov 25, 2011 2:48 pm    Post subject: cooking stock Reply with quote

I had about six necks two wings and a whole turkey carcass in a 15 quart pan and used the recipe for the stock but when i took it out of the fridge it was completely solid from to much gelatin is this good or bad? it must be really concentrated.

Last edited by Dickiedog on Fri Nov 25, 2011 5:27 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
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Location: central PA

PostPosted: Fri Nov 25, 2011 7:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

that's a good thing.

warm it a bit so you can easily strain out the chunks . . .
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IAmNotACook
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 16, 2011 5:20 am    Post subject: Frozen Stock Safe to Reheat in Microwave? Reply with quote

I've just recently discovered the Joys of Stock. I could kick myself for the number of chicken carcasses we've discarded over the years after having a roast chicken for dinner or worse yet, buying them at the store. Probably hundreds by now.

After making stock with the Thanksgiving turkey leftovers and finding it delicious, this past week I did a chicken stock. I immediately made chicken soup with about 1/3 of the stock, and froze the rest.

Two days ago, I took the frozen stock out of the freezer and it's been thawing in the fridge. We keep the fridge quite cold, so today the stock is still like a "chicken slushy", although some of it is now more liquid than it was yesterday.

Tonight I reheated a bowl of the thawed-ish stock for a quick snack, and since I didn't want to dirty an extra dish I just scooped some stock-slush out into a bowl and reheated that in the mikey. Was this a dumb thing to do? I cooked it for 6 minutes and high and it wasn't hot enough, cooked it for 6 minutes more, and then tested the temp with a meat thermometer and it said it was at the "poultry" level (180 degrees, if I recall). But in the back of my mind I remember something about keeping the stock at 180 degrees for a certain period of time when it was cooking - is that necessary when reheating too?

Thanks, oh ye fellow over-analyzers of cookery!
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1626
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Sat Dec 17, 2011 7:54 am    Post subject: Re: Frozen Stock Safe to Reheat in Microwave? Reply with quote

IAmNotACook wrote:
Tonight I reheated a bowl of the thawed-ish stock for a quick snack, and since I didn't want to dirty an extra dish I just scooped some stock-slush out into a bowl and reheated that in the mikey. Was this a dumb thing to do? I cooked it for 6 minutes and high and it wasn't hot enough, cooked it for 6 minutes more, and then tested the temp with a meat thermometer and it said it was at the "poultry" level (180 degrees, if I recall). But in the back of my mind I remember something about keeping the stock at 180 degrees for a certain period of time when it was cooking - is that necessary when reheating too?

If the stock was chilled and promptly frozen (no contamination) after you made it, there's no need to bring it up to 180F or anything like that. We make the stock at 180F to provide an environment hot enough for the collagen in the bones to rapidly denature/hydrolyze into gelatin and enter the cooking liquid without bringing the stock to a boiling level which can break up chicken bits and cloud the stock. That's why 180F was chosen for cooking temp.

The reason why it took so long to heat was probably due to the ample amount of ice (slush) which does not absorb energy from microwave radiation as readily as liquid water.
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