Cooking For Engineers Forum Index Cooking For Engineers
Analytical cooking discussed.
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Calphalon hard anodized pans
Goto page 1, 2  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Cooking For Engineers Forum Index -> Engineer Speak
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
lebellue



Joined: 07 Apr 2006
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Tue Apr 11, 2006 7:23 pm    Post subject: Calphalon hard anodized pans Reply with quote

Is it true that the Calphalon hard anodized pans have no chemicals on the surface such as teflon, etc.? Are the totally just treated aluminum? Do you know how it's done?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Yama



Joined: 21 Apr 2006
Posts: 4

PostPosted: Fri Apr 21, 2006 7:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Anodizing is almost exaclty the same as Chrome plating a bumper. It's an electroplating process which Oxidizes (rusts) the pan. Al oxide is evolved from the surface and is converted to Al hydrate. So, you are actually putting a chemical on the pan but it won't come off like PTFE (teflon). I do chrome plating at work, but not anodizing. It's a very similar process. I'm not sure what thickness they put on - it's probably around .0005 inches
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
GaryProtein



Joined: 26 Oct 2005
Posts: 535

PostPosted: Tue Jul 11, 2006 2:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I beg to disagree here. In my limited experience with calphalon, because I hate its lack of durability, the calphalon anodize comes of at least as easily as earlier generations of teflon cookware. (There are at least five generations of Teflon cookware, maybe as many as seven. You can check the duPont website for the latest, tonight I am too lazy to check.) You cannot use metal or anything not smooth and softer than the surface or else it scratches. The statement that the anodize on the aluminum calphalon pots and pans is extremely hard is technically true in theory, but NOT TRUE in practice because the aluminum base metal is so soft compared to the anodize, that the anodize is not well supported and therefore can be easily scratched/dug off. An example would be the candy shell on an M&M. The sugar shell is very hard and not easily scratched with a knife, but because the chocolate under the shell is soft, the shell can be broken off the chocolate inside.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
MeganAmyH



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 20

PostPosted: Tue Jul 11, 2006 4:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Actually, the silver that you see on the anodized aluminum pans is *not* scratches....it's metal shavings left on it from metal spoons, other pans, etc. A little Barkeepers Friend will take care of them.

Anodized aluminum is almost as hard as stainless, it really is.

I should mention that I'm a diehard fan of SS, and have no use for the AA. But I still have to know all about it for work Smile
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address
GaryProtein



Joined: 26 Oct 2005
Posts: 535

PostPosted: Tue Jul 11, 2006 5:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

MeganAmyH wrote:
Anodized aluminum is almost as hard as stainless, it really is. Smile


Like I said, the anodize is hard, but its supporting material--the aluminum is soft, so the anodize gets damaged easily.

MeganAmyH wrote:
Actually, the silver that you see on the anodized aluminum pans is *not* scratches....it's metal shavings left on it from metal spoons, other pans, etc. A little Barkeepers Friend will take care of them. Smile


Sorry, but in my case it isn't metal from cooking implements. it is the base aluminum. Calphalon is grossly over-rated. I have had many discussions with people from various stores including Williams-Sonoma about this. You can scratch the anodize with a copper penny, and you will see silvery aluminum beneath the anodize that is exposed, not coppery copper on the surface of the anodize. If you rub it lightly, you may deposit some copper on the surface, but not if it is rubbed firmly as when deglazing or rubbing the bottom of the pan to scrape something off it. You can remove metal marks from a metal whisk with Bar Keepers Friend, but a metal spatula will cut off the anodize.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
MeganAmyH



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 20

PostPosted: Wed Jul 12, 2006 5:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I work at Williams-Sonoma Smile

One of the cool things about working there is how often reps from the different companies come in and show us all the stuff about their products. Having talked to both All Clad and Calphalon reps, I can say that the inner aluminum is no softer than the outer. Yes, it is possble to scratch the black all the way to the silver underneath, but you REALLY have to work at it. Considering that our CalOne pans get used just about daily in cooking demos, with metal utensils, and no silver gouges.... Believe me, they do demos with those pans on purpose, for just that reason.

My co-workers love the stuff. Me, thanks, I'll still stick to my stainless steel.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address
GaryProtein



Joined: 26 Oct 2005
Posts: 535

PostPosted: Wed Jul 12, 2006 5:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I never said the "inner" aluminum was different from "outer" aluminum on Calphalon pots and pans. I said the inner aluminum is so much softer than the anodize, that the anodize can be scratched off. By "inner" aluminum, I was referring to the parent metal of the pot, not the inside (where the food goes) vs the outside (where it touches the stove). I'm glad the store has better luck with Calphalon than I did. I like Williams-Sonoma, I don't like Calphalon.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
MeganAmyH



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 20

PostPosted: Thu Jul 13, 2006 4:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I like Williams-Sonoma, I don't like Calphalon.

Here here! Smile

I knew you meant the inner aluminum, not the inside of the pan. My point is simply that the pans that we have at work that get a pretty good beating are still in very good shape, and not showing any inner aluminum.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address
jennyconfused
Guest





PostPosted: Wed Dec 27, 2006 3:18 am    Post subject: Anodized versus ss Reply with quote

I have read that hard anodized actually is a process in which the aluminum is hardened, making the pots/pans light and durable. The reason I am researching this is I was given a pot/pan set for christmas. It's anodized aluminum and I like stainless, but arthritis is taking over and the lightness of AA seams great. I have heard bad things about teflon,yes mine are coated(not with teflon) I just would like some facts. Thanks Sad
Back to top
opqdan



Joined: 25 May 2006
Posts: 43

PostPosted: Sat Apr 28, 2007 3:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I just thought I would chime in that I have had Calphalon Anodized aluminum pans for a little over 2 years now, and Other than the edges of one pan where I have really bashed it, the anodized layer hasn't come off anywhere. I am brutal on this stuff too. Mine is the calphalon commerical though, not the stuff you get in the stores.

Heck, I wish it would. I really really want to purchase some nice stainless cookware (All Clad), but my wife won't let me as long as our current set is in good condition. Not that I have any problem with the aluminum, it's just that I prefer stainless.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
GaryProtein



Joined: 26 Oct 2005
Posts: 535

PostPosted: Sun Apr 29, 2007 1:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Where did you get "commercial" calphalon and how is it different from the others?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Guest






PostPosted: Wed May 02, 2007 2:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm a guest and actually never frequent this website much at all - I just stumbled across via Google while doing research on anodizing aluminum.

The 2nd poster above is only half correct - he/she ultimately missed the question.

The question regards whether there is the presence of Teflon on anodized cookware. The answer is both yes and no and in order to find out, you simply just have to see whether the cookware has a non-stick coating or not. You can further inquire about this from the manufacturer.

Some of them anodize the cookware and then apply Teflon nonstick coating. Some of them even anodize WITH Teflon ( http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-hard-anodizing.htm ). Don't you find it suspicious when you're searching for hard anodized cookware and some of them feature a 'nonstick' coating?

The companies may simply be interchanging 'nonstick coating' with the anodizing process but it won't hurt for you to find out if there's really Teflon on the cookware if that's your true concern. After all, if you Google 'anodized cookware with teflon' you'll really come across cookware for sale that are both anodized aluminum and coated with Teflon.
Back to top
opqdan



Joined: 25 May 2006
Posts: 43

PostPosted: Wed May 09, 2007 9:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

GaryProtein wrote:
Where did you get "commercial" calphalon and how is it different from the others?
I got mine from Amazon a while back.

The difference is that the commercial is what Calphalon made and sold before they really got into the home consumer market. These are their original anodized pans and were create for what I assume to be professional kitchens. They stopped making the style when they came out with all of the new Calphalon One and all that jazz.

From what I can tell, only the style (look) is different, and all the materials are the same, but I don't know if they changed the way they do the coating or not.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
william gunnar



Joined: 27 Sep 2008
Posts: 3
Location: Boston, MA area

PostPosted: Sat Sep 27, 2008 6:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi.

I'm new to the group. I'm also a chemist, who's worked with leading non stick coatings producers for years. So, be sure to let me know if I can help.

Benefits of hard anodize, besides creating a nice anchor pattern for 'Teflon,' actually include improved surface heat distribution. Electrons in ceramic molecules are more tightly held than in metals, you know.

Your non stick cookware should last for years. But, to be safe, here are a few suggestions:

Be sure your cookware has good mass. (Thinner metal risks overheating coatings.) Of course, never heat an empty (no load) pan. Use plastic utensils, not metal, no matter what the claim. And avoid using non stick cookware at higher heat; medium heat can work well, just save your 'browning' for other cookware.

If you'd like more information, just see:
Teflon Non Stick Coatings
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Guest






PostPosted: Wed Mar 02, 2011 2:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

MeganAmyH wrote:

My co-workers love the stuff. Me, thanks, I'll still stick to my stainless steel.


Stainless steel cookware is a great choice for safe cooking. Many kinds of cookware react with the foods, either changing the taste of the food or even releasing harmful materials into the food that can cause imbalances o diseases. Many non-stick coatings like Teflon are safe but once they get scratched or overhead they can start to leak chemicals in the food that are according to some scientific studies dangerous and possibly carcinogenic.
Back to top
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Cooking For Engineers Forum Index -> Engineer Speak All times are GMT
Goto page 1, 2  Next
Page 1 of 2

 
Jump to:  
You can post new topics in this forum
You can reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group