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Kitchen Notes: Tempering Chocolate
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angerhater



Joined: 05 Dec 2010
Posts: 1
Location: charlotte nc

PostPosted: Sun Dec 05, 2010 1:18 am    Post subject: awesome first try at peppermint bark Reply with quote

thanx for all the insights everyone, I just made my first batches of peppermint bark..first was a small test batch...I just melted nestle semisweet chips in the microwave till they were glistening and warm....stirred it smooth....added some "seed" chips and mint extract, stirred up really well...smoothed out onto tinfoil...sprinkled with candy crumbs, chilled and repeated for the white chocolate...seems like I never lost its temper...stays fairly firm at room temp. even.......thanx again
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Suzanne
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PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2010 11:34 pm    Post subject: :o) Reply with quote

No helpful hints, just a thought... I LOVE the fact that this thread started in 2006, and it's still going strong! What a tribute to the high quality of posts that people have been adding over the years. I have bookmarked this thread so that I won't lose it. Thanks, everyone!!
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beginner
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PostPosted: Wed Dec 08, 2010 11:54 pm    Post subject: help? Reply with quote

Can chocolate that wasn't tempered correctly be melted down again and will it solidify correctly if tempered properly the second time?
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1620
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Fri Dec 10, 2010 3:16 am    Post subject: Re: help? Reply with quote

beginner wrote:
Can chocolate that wasn't tempered correctly be melted down again and will it solidify correctly if tempered properly the second time?

Yes, as long as the ingredients are still pure (it hasn't been mixed with other stuff for candy making or something else and then you attempt to retemper - that's not going to work)
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Guest






PostPosted: Tue Dec 28, 2010 12:58 am    Post subject: P.S. on posts of 3/25/08 & 8/4/08 Reply with quote

Note to anyone interested in the Revolation I tempering mentioned in posts of 3/25/08 and 8/4/08. Prices and dates are no longer valid and outdated. Check appropriate websites for current pricing.
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fatima
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 18, 2011 8:23 pm    Post subject: tempering choc HELP Reply with quote

hi i need to temper chocolate to use on transfer sheets ofr a cake border and to mould for decorations on a choc cake . i need to no firstly how difficult it really is to temper (i have a thermometer and a double boiler )and then once it is tempered and if i have any left over wat do i do with it ? how do i store it and then how do i re use it .also i need to travel with it once the choc transfer is set on the cake . will it melt before i get to the wedding ?do i need to put t on ice ?

thanks in advance .
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MehdiTruffles
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 04, 2011 6:35 am    Post subject: Sous-Vide Tempering Reply with quote

I am developing an interesting method of tempering by using a circulator. I would love to get your thoughts. Here is my link:
http://mehditruffles.blogspot.com/2011/02/sous-vide-tempering-is-whats-next-in.html
Thanks,
Mehdi Chellaoui

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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1620
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Fri Feb 04, 2011 8:48 pm    Post subject: Re: Sous-Vide Tempering Reply with quote

MehdiTruffles wrote:
I am developing an interesting method of tempering by using a circulator. I would love to get your thoughts. Here is my link:
http://mehditruffles.blogspot.com/2011/02/sous-vide-tempering-is-whats-next-in.html

If you don't have a tempering machine, but do have a sous vide setup, then using your water bath to temper chocolate is the next best way to go. (Tempering machines have some more complicated cycles that aren't going to be convenient to mimic in a water bath, but it will definitely be better than any fully manual techniques with high temperature error like double boilers.) Sous vide chocolate tempering is on my list of articles/topics to cover in the sous vide series.
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an anonymous pastry chef
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 06, 2011 2:28 am    Post subject: Tips Reply with quote

Hey there!

Regarding your seeding method, your picture shows what appears to be a snazy chocolate bar being used for the seed, so I just thought I'd mention that any chocolate you buy will be tempered despite it's scuffed appearance; those are just scratches from rough transport, the cocoa butter crystals are all fine.
It also helps to give the seed a good fine chop-chop to help it melt away quickly (if you are instead leaving a solid piece in and then removing it once you're down to temperature, that is what I would call 'using a boot').
Buying chocolate, avoid 'melting wafers', but anything labeled 'couveture' will be good.

Some words of advice from a pastry chef and irregular chocolatier!
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Person Above
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 06, 2011 2:30 am    Post subject: uh, sorry for redundancy Reply with quote

What I said may have already been covered, I hit a button to comment on the recipe page but it looks like this is a discussion thread, so, sorry if I'm repeating what's been said (or contradicting it, for that matter!).
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eliza
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 09, 2011 5:43 am    Post subject: what's the point? Reply with quote

I love baking and this has been a fascinating read, but can anyone give me some examples of what to do with tempered chocolate? Or is it just meant to be eaten straight?
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1006
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Wed Feb 09, 2011 8:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm sure there are many uses for "tempered" chocolate I've not personally encountered, but I would say tempering is more about the chocolate texture and appearance than where to specifically use it.

tempering changes the crystalline structure of chocolate (compounds) which allows it to cool in a hard(er) state and with a shiny surface.

those two qualities - texture and appearance - are used for a whole bunch of stuff. enrobed candy centers, crisp coating on cookies, a 'crisp' topping for softer baked goods -

if you don't want the chocolate to melt & stick to your fingers, tempering is one way to get there.
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William
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 04, 2011 12:48 am    Post subject: BLOOM!!! HELP!!! Reply with quote

I have the same problem as Guest did on Nov. 24, 2009, and there was no answer. As far as I know I'm tempering the chocolate correctly - I use a thermometer and control the temperature. I also use excellent chocolate. I made a separate chocolate filling and dip it. At first the chocolate looks great, but within hours a bad bloom has developed and by the next morning almost every piece is like that - but not every piece. The truffles are nice and snappy and taste great, the texture is good - they're just all bloomed. I can't figure it out. I hope it's not because I've developed a few cuss words specific to chocolate.
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William
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 04, 2011 6:24 am    Post subject: BLOOM!!! HELP!!! Reply with quote

Replying to myself: Well, this time the chocolate hasn't bloomed. At least not yet a few hours later. But it is dull. The first time I ever tempered chocolate it worked perfectly - we still have some after a couple of weeks and it's still dark and shiny. That was the only time it worked. I think the problem is keeping it at the right temperature while dipping - it's hard to do, have to rely on an instant temp thermometer that isn't very instant, have to keep it within a 2-degree range it seems (88-90?), if it goes lower it's dull and subject to bloom, if it goes higher it goes out of temper, and how do I know the thermometer is accurate? And the temp at the bottom of the bowl is higher than at the top. I should probably stir it more often? I've always used a microwave because of the water problem. Today I used a heating pad for the first time and maybe that's why it didn't bloom. I don't know. It's very frustrating, but I have a half-dozen bars of Valrhona dark chocolate to keep playing with, so...it still tastes wonderful. I have to say I did a good job with the filling - if I could only remember how it made it.
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1006
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Fri Mar 04, 2011 7:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

if you've ever seen the inner workings of a confectionery shop, they've got a number of 'specialized' pots with temperature control. there's a reason for that, as you've discovered. doing it 'off the cuff' can be challenging.

the reasons for chocolate blooming are numerous - there's a lot of info on various sites (search: "chocolate blooming") - pretty much any slight mis-step can trigger blooming.
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