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Recipe File: Prime Rib or Standing Rib Roast
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KurtB



Joined: 28 Dec 2010
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Tue Dec 28, 2010 11:45 pm    Post subject: Cooking temp Reply with quote

This is my first post here.
Excellent discussion

I was searching for a roasting calculator and everyone I found sucked. (You can't select both weight and temp)

I read this a few years back in Cooks Illustrated and found it online today:
https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=http://www.cooksillustrated.com/images/document/howto/SO96_HTbeef.pdf

It goes into scientific detail as to why the meat should be cooked at 250F and then finished at 500F. Well worth the reading. I really like their magazine because they not only do a lot of testing, but they tell you the scientific reasoning behind their discoveries.

I do most of my roasting on my smoker but I am roasting chuck roast for 150 persons on New Years Eve. (done right chuck roast is incredible) The cooking times that people posted here are a big help. THANK YOU ALL!!

Years ago working at a steak restaurant, for people wanting their meat overdone (a.k.a. more than medium), we would dip the pieces in hot au jus. The meat did not cook much more but appeared to. If they complain, ask them if they would like ketchup also... Teasing

Bon apetit!

almost forgot... at the restaurant Sundays were prep day. I made fajitas with left over prime rib for the crew... tequila, lime, cilantro
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tonelow66@charter.net
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PostPosted: Wed Dec 29, 2010 11:42 pm    Post subject: PRIME-RIB STANDING RISS ROAST............ Reply with quote

Everybody had some excelant input on how to prepare this dish. Seems to be from trial and error. All of the ideas for the seasoning were great. I want to say just a couple of things that I have found. Season the heck out of the outside of the meat. Don't be scared of overseasoning. Rubb your spices on and let the piece of meat set in the fridge. \ Do this the day before at least. The longer the better. I cover my meat. Let the meat set out till it reaches room temperature. Preheat the oven to 500% Put the meat on the rack with a pan underneath to catch the drippings for 10 minutes. Dropp the heat to 200% for about 2 hours. Get a meat thermometer. When it reaches 135% take it out and let set for about 30 minutes. You can't go wrong. While this is setting take the drippings and add a little whistercheshire, beef base, and the same wine that you will be serving with this meal. Let this reduce. This is your aujus. Enjoy.....
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Guest
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PostPosted: Sat Jan 01, 2011 1:15 am    Post subject: Prime Rib Reply with quote

I disagree with the people who insist on a high temp followed by a low temp because I want it red all the way to the edge, not 1 inch or even 1/2 inch from the edge......200 degrees all the way results in red all the way. This year i will try quick browning in a pan, but if it results in less red I will not repeat.

My other point is that we are only two people so in years past I have done a 1 lb 13 oz without ribs and this takes only 1 hour to get to 110 degrees (I cooked a few min more to get get to 125). My point is this is less than 45 min per pound. So I think the 45 min per pound for less than 5 lbs should be corrected for very small roasts (and,yes, I know it is better with a big roast but I have no choice and I have had excellent results with two person roasts as long as you follow the 200 degree rule). In a few minutes I will do a 1 rib roast (with bone) that weighs 2 lbs 3 oz. I am estimating about 1 hour and 15 min. Both start at room temp.
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KurtB



Joined: 28 Dec 2010
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Sat Jan 01, 2011 10:42 pm    Post subject: Chuck Roast Reply with quote

I did chuck roast (roasted for 150 on New Year's eve. 4 roast between 30 and forty pounds a piece. ($2.48/lb) They took approximately 5 hours using the method I mentioned above. Wow... awesome!! Raving reviews and several people thought it was prime rib!!
My staff cut the pieces just under 1/2" thick, however the roast is so large, most guests took only half a piece. (something to note for next time.)
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MrsBoots
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 04, 2011 10:19 pm    Post subject: Just cooking my 2nd Standing Rib Roast using THIS Recipe! Reply with quote

We tried cooking standing rib roast only a few times before, becasue they always came out med-well on the outside with only a few pieces inside to OUR liking (rare to med-rare).

Found this site last year, standing rib roasts were on sale and tried it -- used someone else's crust idea but THIS is the PERFECT rare to med-rare ALL the way through!! Hooked and Thank you SO much!

This year on sale before Christmas I bought a 6.45 lb one and thawed it out and left to "age" the last few days in fridge. Today let it warm up, on the counter for about 2 hours (then had to wash it because one of our cats decided to "pre-taste" it!!! Shock ).

Made my own rub (olve oil, garlic chopped pieced, salt & whole peppercorns in blender)... coated and seared it... got my oven to 220 and have just put it in -- We can't WAIT to have our 2nd best meal since I found this website!

Thank you for making it EASY to make the purrrrfect standing rib roast

MrsBoots
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pauluskc
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PostPosted: Sat Jan 08, 2011 6:05 am    Post subject: e-mc2 Reply with quote

......Like Einstein, this ended up perfect. Thanks for the pointers.

Fantasy Football winnings enabled the 13lb boneless rib roast, this year.

Got a couple days in the fridge, cut that off. 1pm in the 200 F oven after searing in olive oil, rub, fresh rosemary and oregano. NOTE: thick rubber gloves like from the rotisserie work affirmatively whilst searing.

Probe thermometer got me 120 to 135 parts, skinny side was 135, popped it out and wrapped the roasting pan with foil - put it on the buffet (beer pong table) and let it rest while the last guest arrived, used some juice with some bullion (forgot the broth) and worked out alright enough.

Overall results were 99% exactly like the 2nd photograph of end results at the top of this post. Pink throughout, pure delight.

Thanks, live long and prosper!
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Rrrosenwald
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 03, 2011 3:59 pm    Post subject: Raising the temperature of food Reply with quote

If one has a 5 Kilo pork butt with an internal temperature of 69 C in a pit barbeque with a steady temperature of 108 C how could one calculate the length of time to get the pork to an internal temperature of 90.6 C?

Is there a rough way to approximate this?
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1012
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Sun Jul 03, 2011 10:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

>>Is there a rough way to approximate this?

yes. it's done.

if the pork is at 69'C=152'F internal - it's done.

not sure why one would want to cook pork to an internal temp of 90.6'C=195.1'F - not recommended.
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Lee
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 28, 2011 12:35 pm    Post subject: Prime Rib Reply with quote

What is the differance between a Prime Ribeye Lip-On 2 x 2 roast and a Prime Rib Roast.
Can I cook them the same way and will the ribeye roast be as good as the Prime Rib.
My wife gets the Ribeye roast from work and we always cut them into steaks.
Thank you for any help
Lee
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1012
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Sat Oct 01, 2011 9:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

the names of cuts is only sorta semi partially "standard"

so one really must look at the cow and where the cut is coming from.

ye olde rib roast - there's a couple hundred thousand opinions about whether the best meat comes from the large / front - middle - or small / rear part of the roast.

if you look at the roast, depending on trim, it will have several distinct chunks of muscle group(s).

there's a chunk along the spine to the dorsal side often called "chain meat"

the 2-3 major chunks in the rib roast - slice up a rib roast and you'll get a steak often called "Delmonico" or "rib eye"

"lip on" - dunno. potentially refers to the small muscle/fat portion at the very bottom of the rib.

"2x2" = nadda clue. if your butcher can translate the local naming to something more specific, might be able to decipher what it means.

"prime rib roast" - has _zero_ to do with USDA meat grade of "Prime"
it's a rib roast, standing rib roast, couple dozen more names for it....
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PopsOnline
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 23, 2011 1:59 am    Post subject: Too big to pan sear, and cooking ahead of time Reply with quote

Great site and great instructions! Have used method for years, also with inspiration from Cook's mag. If your 7-rib roast is too big for stove-top searing, preheat oven to 500. When nicely browned (watch closely), REMOVE FROM OVEN and allow oven temp to come down to 200. Then follow the engineer's instructions. I have a very small oven, so I must cook mine well ahead of time to finish turkey, mac and cheese, etc. NO PROBLEM! Let the roast sit until ready to serve. Slice "to order", and reheat quickly in a saute' pan in about 1/2" of au jus. Done properly, only the very outside of slice will turn color and the meat will still be medium rare.
ABOUT AU JUS: My family loves au jus and there never seems to be enough. Take your favorite store-bought beef stock and reduce by 1/3 over medium-low heat with some of the drippings. This will give a rich but not overpowering au jus. Hope these tips help!
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wldgrdnr
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 23, 2011 8:05 pm    Post subject: how to cook with high and low heat Reply with quote

I have been cooking prime rib for years using an alternate method with a good result, but may try your method this year to avoid a tiny bit of brown edge.

At any rate IF you are cooking the high heat/low heat method it is important to open the oven door, and let the oven cool down (I use 250 usually)...If you JUST lower the oven temp, without opening the door to cool down to 250, your prime will be cooking at the higher heat for quite some time...

so for those who have some guests who like it a little (key word being little as this way mostly comes out med rare throughout, with slightly more cooked on the exterior pieces) but you like yours med rare, I suggest the following: roast for 15 min @ 500, then open oven door until oven is 250 degrees, then put your roast back in and cook 10-15 min/lb @ 250...Let it rest for 20-30 min after coming out of oven so the juices absorb back into the meat.

I think I may give your 200 throughout a shot as just cooking for hubby and myself, we consider it a sacriledge to cook any beef more than med rare....enjoy
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Clive
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 28, 2011 4:43 pm    Post subject: Love this site Reply with quote

I've experimented with various methods over the years but do find slow roasting produces a more even doneness if this is what you are aiming for. I do tend to panick in the last hour that the meat will not be 'done' at meal time but force myself to trust that it will.
I've been using a compromise (lazy) method the last few times of seasoning the usually 7 to 8 pound roast with garlic, salt and thyme, drizzling with olive oil and convection roasting at 240'F (115'C). I find it is at 135' (58) after 3 to 3 1/2 hours and reaches 140 (60) medium rare after standing covered for 30 minutes. I insert the thermometer mid way in the bake cycle so as to avoid transferring any surface bacteria inside the roast.
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Teacherman
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PostPosted: Sun Dec 18, 2011 11:00 pm    Post subject: Timing is everything Reply with quote

We've always preferred the term "Slab O Beef", but to each their own. I have used a 250 oven in the past, but will try a 200 one this year. The key to timing is that the larger roasts will require less time per pound. There is no one-size-fits-all approach that will allow you to calculate minutes per pound. It's a sliding scale, so keep notes.
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Guest






PostPosted: Mon Dec 19, 2011 7:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I like to sear roasts on the barbeque grill (gas), I preheat to max temp,
then sear as wanted, usually about 2 + min per side / area until all sides are seared to desired level. Then transfer to preheated 200 degree oven to finish. The higher heat of the hot grill sears quickly and creates a nice bark. Side benfit is the grill surface is large so any sized roast will fit with all surfaces getting a sear and the smoke from the high heat sear is outside not smoking up the house. A couple of soaked mesquite chips on a piece of foil in the back of the grill can add a nice dimension. ( want it to be very subtle )
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