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Recipe File: Prime Rib or Standing Rib Roast
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1025
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Thu Dec 23, 2010 6:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would not put a dang decent slice of prime rib in a microwave for nuttin' - ever.

lettuce as a 'cover' - interesting, not run across that 'technique'

if you can get the slices completely thawed and thence to 'room temp' - a liberal drowning of hot a'jus will probably get you real close.

the bottom line is pretty simple - doing the roast from scratch produces a chunk of meat hotter on the outside and cooler to the center. difficult to replicate that effect precisely in a reheat situation without over cooking some/all portion of the roast - but if the meat was a good chunk to start with and properly roasting to second with, it's a good bet you'll get a sumptuous cut out of it.
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Carol
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 23, 2010 11:46 pm    Post subject: yorkshire pudding vs smokey house Reply with quote

Is there a way to make yorkshire pudding without filling the house with smoke? I really like it, but we're a bunch of non smokers. Sorry, bad joke. Sad
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1635
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Fri Dec 24, 2010 1:41 am    Post subject: Re: yorkshire pudding vs smokey house Reply with quote

Carol wrote:
Is there a way to make yorkshire pudding without filling the house with smoke? I really like it, but we're a bunch of non smokers. Sorry, bad joke. Sad

When I make mine in the oven, there's little to no smoke.
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Sceptical
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 24, 2010 9:49 am    Post subject: "Prime" in the Prime Rib Reply with quote

I didn't get past the first sentence, which is completely wrong. The word "prime" in prime rib does not and never has referred to the USDA prime grade meat. As anyone who knows anything about cuts of meat should know, prime rib is so named because it is cut from the primal section of the carcass.
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Lulu from Wisconsin
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 24, 2010 12:27 pm    Post subject: Prime Rib Roast in a roaster oven Reply with quote

I have always cooked my roast in the oven but never in a roaster oven before. I was told that you can do it. So I have looked on the Internet and found nothing. I want to start the roast in the morning and eat it by 5p.m. today and I would like to get some good advice on how this could be done. This makes me very nervous about doing it this way but it would be nice to use my regular oven for other things that need to be cooked at the same time. Hopefully you have some good advise on how to prepare this beatiful roast so I don't ruin a good roast.


Thank you

Lulu from Wisconsin
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Xmas eve chef
Guest





PostPosted: Fri Dec 24, 2010 1:22 pm    Post subject: 5 lbs and a 7 lbs Reply with quote

Help! I have read through all the posts. I couldn't find anyone with two different sized roasts. So I have been given a 5 lbs and a 7.5 lbs prime rib roast to prepare. Last year a 10 lbs roast came out perfect using this web site.

BUT, how do I figure two dissimilar sized roasts. I am thinking put both in at the same time, after approximately 3.5 hours (pending internal temp), pull the smaller one and let it sit till the larger finishes obtaining the temp (maybe another 1 hour) then raise the oven to 500 and blast both for 10 minutes.

I have two temperature probes so I can watch each one.

Thoughts?

Thanks... a juggling Christmas Eve chef.[/b]
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rkbowen



Joined: 24 Dec 2010
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Fri Dec 24, 2010 3:11 pm    Post subject: @ Sceptical Reply with quote

Why post the negativity? It is quite obvious that the vast majority of folks who visit the site either get answers to questions they have, or provide answers - based on their knowledge and/or experience.

Lighten up... and Merry Christmas!
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1025
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Fri Dec 24, 2010 6:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

>>I have been given a 5 lbs and a 7.5 lbs prime rib roast

with that much difference they will finish at different times.

actually, could work in your favor depending on circumstances - if people will be eating over some period of time, you could start the little one half hour after the first - it would be finished / hot / warm 'later' as well
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GuestL
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 25, 2010 4:46 am    Post subject: Partially Cook Roast? Reply with quote

Great site! I'm making a standing rib roast and bringing it to a family members' home; however, they live about an hour away. Can I partially cook the roast and finish it later at their home? Thank you!
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1635
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Sat Dec 25, 2010 8:47 am    Post subject: Re: Partially Cook Roast? Reply with quote

GuestL wrote:
Great site! I'm making a standing rib roast and bringing it to a family members' home; however, they live about an hour away. Can I partially cook the roast and finish it later at their home? Thank you!

Best to cook it to your desired doneness and then warm it at their home. It will be sort of the same as partially cooking it, but without having to worry about hitting a precise temperature at the other person's home. See, if you cook it at home to 135F, then travel an hour and the temp drops to 100 or 110F, you can reheat in their oven set to the lowest possible temp (usually 170F) for 30-45 min and the roast should be still less than 135F, but plenty warm enough to eat. If you partially cook the roast at home to 110F intending to finish cooking later, by the time you reach the other house it might have cooled to 80-90F, then you have to cook it so that the interior hits 135F which will take longer and might not be convenient.

Something else I should probably mention is that if you do cook the roast to 135F, that is a sufficiently high temperature to kill the most common food borne pathogens so long as the temperature is held there for 40 min or longer. (This isn't usually a problem since a rib roast is quite large and when we cook it in the method outlined above, once the internal temperature reaches 135F, it will stay there for 45 min to an hour before dropping a noticeable amount.) Once below 130F, bacteria can grow again but most of the roast will be bacteria free (since it was held at 135F for over 40 min.), so you should be okay to hold the roast at sub 130F temperatures as you drive to your destination for at most four hours. Try to get the roast back up to 130F or higher within four hours or consume it to avoid pathogen risk for the immune compromised.
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wilsodo
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 25, 2010 5:26 pm    Post subject: What if we have a guest who want their meat medium-well? Reply with quote

I grew up on rare roast beef, but we have kids and a guest who like theirs medium-well done. Sacrebleu!
My roast is 7.7 lbs. 3 rib, about 6 1/2" long
I would hate to do it, but should I carve a third off, making a 5 lb roast and a 2lb steak and roast them at the same time?
I'm wary of using a higher heat method. The ends don't come out all that much more well done.
I'm inclined to go for medium and suffer the consequences but leftovers need to be rare.
What to do?
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1025
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Sat Dec 25, 2010 6:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have this problem all the time - family / guest who want "well done" -

generally I've had better luck pulling the roast at the "optimum" rare/med rare stage, cut off a chunk and put it back in the oven at higher temp for a few minutes.

your mileage may vary . . .
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1635
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Sat Dec 25, 2010 7:37 pm    Post subject: Re: What if we have a guest who want their meat medium-well? Reply with quote

wilsodo wrote:
I grew up on rare roast beef, but we have kids and a guest who like theirs medium-well done. Sacrebleu!

I cook my roast medium-rare and then when serving, slice the serving that needs a little more cooking and place it on a heated pan briefly (while slicing the other servings) until it reaches the desired doneness. It also works well with a little heated jus in the pan to keep the "look" (not accidentally searing the cut surface).
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caesarv
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PostPosted: Sun Dec 26, 2010 2:27 am    Post subject: my results today Reply with quote

Here was my experience...much of it driven by the need to get some sleep:

Prepared full 18 lb rib roast the night before, but had to cut off 3 lbs (one rib) in order to fit it into the roasting pan. Got up at 3am to remove it from the fridge so it could get to room temperature by 6am. Got up at 5:30am to turn on oven at 450F. Got up again at 6am to put it in the oven and immediately lowered temp to 200F. Slept till 9am.

As measured by two thermometers, the oven maintained about 225 deg the entire time. I did not use the convection setting. At 10:20 the internal thermometer measured 115-120F depending upon where it was probed. I removed it. The results were wonderful.

My only comment was that I thought it would take much longer. I was planning on it being done around noon or 1pm. So I guess I could have gotten more sleep if I had known the cooking time was going to be much less than some had speculated. Next time I will plan on only 4.5 hours of cooking time.

Great site...thanks....and yes, I am an engineer.
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1635
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Mon Dec 27, 2010 5:42 am    Post subject: Re: my results today Reply with quote

caesarv wrote:
My only comment was that I thought it would take much longer. I was planning on it being done around noon or 1pm. So I guess I could have gotten more sleep if I had known the cooking time was going to be much less than some had speculated. Next time I will plan on only 4.5 hours of cooking time.

I've been meaning to publish a new prime rib article with a full explanation of cooking times. The old, traditional method of estimating time by multiplying some factor against weight just doesn't work with a rib roast. In fact, for large roasts, the cooking time is almost of the same regardless of weight (10-16 pounds all take about the same amount of time in the same oven). This is because the surface area of the roast increases almost proportionally to the weight. When cooking a turkey, when the weight doubles, the surface area does not, so cooking time must be extended and the easiest way to represent that is by taking the weight and multiplying it by some amount of time. If you think about it though, there's really no shape of roast or type of meat where such a linear relationship could possibly ever work at accurately predicting cooking time.
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