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Recipe File: Dark Chocolate Brownies
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1629
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Sun Jun 29, 2008 5:03 am    Post subject: Re: Fantastic recipe Reply with quote

Anonymous wrote:
Just a question, how do we ensure that the bottom does not get stuck. I did butter the pan and floured it but was unable to overturn the pan and get the brownie complete into another plate.

If using more butter with a light coating of flour doesn't solve the problem, your only recourse (without trying a different pan) is to have a sacrificial piece that you scoop out first and then you should be able to perfectly lift all the other pieces out of the pan.
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manda
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 16, 2008 3:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi guys,
My brownies just finished baking a minute ago. But the top of the brownies cracked like a chocolate cake would. Anybody knows why? i followed the recipe I got from www.community.livejournal.com/bakebakebake-few ppl tried it and their brownies looked so awesome, and baked at 180degreeC Ive no idea why my brownies always crack Sad Its happened a few times alrd, Ill try to tuen the temp down when it cracks bt im afraid low temp would not produce a moist brownie, bt a dry one
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sherri
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 16, 2008 3:29 pm    Post subject: Re: Fantastic recipe Reply with quote

Michael Chu wrote:
Anonymous wrote:
Just a question, how do we ensure that the bottom does not get stuck. I did butter the pan and floured it but was unable to overturn the pan and get the brownie complete into another plate.

If using more butter with a light coating of flour doesn't solve the problem, your only recourse (without trying a different pan) is to have a sacrificial piece that you scoop out first and then you should be able to perfectly lift all the other pieces out of the pan.



Or i suggest buttering the pan then layering a layer of baking paper. It always works for me.
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justinpaluch
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 26, 2009 1:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

manda wrote:
Hi guys,
My brownies just finished baking a minute ago. But the top of the brownies cracked like a chocolate cake would. Anybody knows why?


Months late on a reply, but I just read a different recipe that said this happened when they used a mixer. Mixing by hand yielded the normal brownie tops. Hope that helps.
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jada
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 10, 2009 9:00 pm    Post subject: thank you Reply with quote

thanks so much for sharing your recipe with everybody!!

mine are currently in the oven and smell great. I live in the UK and used green and blacks cocoa 75% dark chocolate. ( I noticed that one of the posters mentioned it was hard to get the right chocolate here) Its also fair trade which is obviously a bonus.

Does the 160C stated apply to fan assisted ovens too? or is that for normal ovens?? If the later , this may explain why some people needed to cook for less time and why others experienced the crack....

thanks again xx
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1629
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Tue Feb 10, 2009 10:31 pm    Post subject: Re: thank you Reply with quote

jada wrote:
Does the 160C stated apply to fan assisted ovens too? or is that for normal ovens?? If the later , this may explain why some people needed to cook for less time and why others experienced the crack...

All temperatures are for ovens without fans.
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Guest






PostPosted: Fri Apr 10, 2009 2:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just discovered this web site, by accident really, and it is fantastic, what a brilliant way to set out recipes! Brownies are in the oven and this is the first stress free cooking I have done in ages!
Thank you!
Smile
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Jozi Cook
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 03, 2009 11:05 am    Post subject: Brownies Reply with quote

These were great brownies! I had to bake them a little extra but they were gobbled down by a troop of hungry boys!

I added the coffee to one of two batches and could taste the difference. It really does intensify the chocolate flavour.

Thanks a stack!
Smile
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irtx



Joined: 23 Dec 2009
Posts: 1
Location: SF

PostPosted: Wed Dec 23, 2009 10:24 pm    Post subject: dark chocolate brownies Reply with quote

The recipe makes a good brownie but I think is improved by the use of UNSWEETENED chocolate VS. semi-sweet (AKA "bittersweet"). Just a little bit more of on the chocolate side of the balance versus the sugar side.
Right on on the website. I love the fact that it assumes that the practitioner is starting from "scratch" ...that is we menfolk frequently do not have the basics folded in to our cosmology at our parent's knees.
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cmg54
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 25, 2010 3:05 am    Post subject: Dark Chocolate Brownies Reply with quote

And the result was ... excellent. I made these for my son's birthday. I only substituted dark-brown sugar and only added 1 cup of it, instead of the 1.5. They were a hit with my sons, their friends and my husband. I am not a big fan of chocolate in general and brownies in particular, but even I thought they were pretty smooth and tasty.

Thanks for the presentation of your recipes. Very analytical indeed.
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pulseft
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PostPosted: Sun Aug 08, 2010 1:50 am    Post subject: Cracked Tops Reply with quote

About the cracked tops of brownies, I just had this happen to me and was wondering why it did. Perhaps it has to do with the oven air being dry and drying out the brownies top, combined with perhaps allowing the mixture to sit a little bit after adding flour, which may give time to rise? I know that in baking breads in the oven, after preheating and right after the dough is in the oven, you toss in about 1/2 cup of water and it prevents the surface from hardening/cracking too soon. I will try this technique next time I cook brownies.
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PostPosted: Sun Aug 22, 2010 1:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have had this recipe in my collection for awhile and haven't had a chance to try it until recently. All I can say is that is is the absolute best brownie recipe I have ever had. I have never commented on a recipe before but I knew I had to when I tasted these. They were so moist and chewy and they were even simple. My girlfriend and her whole family loved them so much we made another batch the next day. There is a special place in my heart for these brownies.
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katoodles
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 09, 2010 1:15 am    Post subject: Awesome Reply with quote

Before I discovered I have a sensitivity to gluten I made these brownies and they were the best brownies I'd ever had! When I found out I needed to cut out all purpose flour I was unable to say good bye to these brownies. I have replaced the flour with 100% almond flour and I have to say they are now EVEN BETTER!!

Thank you!

-K
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Anonymous1
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PostPosted: Wed Dec 22, 2010 6:23 pm    Post subject: Two cents Reply with quote

Just to add two cents to the discussion. In American brownies, those that choose to put nuts in the recipe, the traditional nut to use is walnuts, not pecans. Although I love pecans and have lived in the southern US for decades, walnuts are the better choice for brownies. Secondly, cinnamon & chile added to chocolate is a Mexican recipe (originally Mayan). Some people like it others don't. It's done in chocolate, truffles, and hot chocolate, but not usually in brownies (as brownies aren't part of the Mexican repertoire). Nonetheless, try it if you feel adventurous. Just remember, the chocolate isn't intended to be overly spicy, it just brings out different flavors.
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 13, 2011 3:48 am    Post subject: Bain marie, and additions Reply with quote

As the recipe contains water in some form or another, the internal temperature of the brownie is limited to the boiling point of water. Of course, the skin dries out, and can see excursions higher than the boiling point. If one cooks the brownie in a bain marie, will the lower temperature, better heat transfer and higher humidity reduce this hard skin effect?

Someone mentioned chipotle in a brownie, which is of course a smoked jalapeno. Beyond nuts or chilis, another thing which goes well into chocolate is bacon. I'm unsure about black pepper in chocolate, but a nice smoked bacon would work. So would a number of the sausages (probably avoiding the ones with black pepper). Citrus zest will go into chocolate nicely. It would be interesting to try a chiffinade (sp?) of peppermint or spearmint leaves. Especially if the bain marie idea works.

But, a nice website. Thanks for sharing.
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