Cooking For Engineers Forum Index Cooking For Engineers
Analytical cooking discussed.
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Recipe File: Cheesecake, Plain New York Style
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Cooking For Engineers Forum Index -> Comments Forum
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1619
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Mon Jul 19, 2010 1:08 am    Post subject: Re: very confused Reply with quote

Anonymous wrote:
tried this recipe. after about 7 minutes at 500, my cheesecake was so burnt on top that I'm pretty sure I'm not going to eat it. this is a pretty mediocre 25 year old oven, so we're not talking about some over-efficient oven. and we're not talking a little brown.

If your oven was able to burn the top of your cheesecake in 7 minutes, I would highly suggest getting an oven thermometer from your local kitchen supply store or online.

Here is an example of one that works and sells for less than $5: Taylor Oven Thermometer
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Guest






PostPosted: Mon Sep 27, 2010 11:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Do you think if I want to add a banana flavor to the cake, can I just add some mashed bananas without changing the rest of the ingredients? Or will adding mashed bananas will make the cheesecake too soft? Thanks.
Back to top
Majesty



Joined: 05 Jan 2009
Posts: 11
Location: Utrecht, the Netherlands

PostPosted: Fri Oct 08, 2010 1:34 pm    Post subject: Layer of raspberries Reply with quote

If I want to add a layer of raspberries in this cheesecake, how would I do that? Would I need less moist in the rest of the recipe because of the moist in the raspberries? Or would I have to add something to the raspberries to make it dryer?
I hope someone can help me with this -- I want to make this cheesecake next week, but preferably with raspberries (as you understand) because plain style is not really to my taste.

And if I wanted to make a lemon-cheesecake, I guess I would have to add lemon-juice but leave some other juice/moist out of it, in order to keep the moist/dry-balance perfect. And would I have to compensate for the acidity with extra sugar?

Any help would be appreciated. Thanks so much!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address
Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1005
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Fri Oct 08, 2010 3:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

if you are using whole raspberries, you won't need to 'adjust' the moisture/liquid content. the filling cooks at a low enough temp that the berries won't go to mush and release a lot of juice. if they are pureed/mashed you may need to adjust for a large quantity -
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Mel
Guest





PostPosted: Fri Oct 15, 2010 5:44 am    Post subject: Bubbles Reply with quote

Well this is the first time I have ever tried to make New York style cheese cake. I think everything has went OK, But I noticed that after the ten mins of baking at 500 that there where two large bubbles. kinda like it was rising in those areas. Not sure what to make of it. Both over all that seems to be just a minor cosmetic flaw...
Back to top
Majesty



Joined: 05 Jan 2009
Posts: 11
Location: Utrecht, the Netherlands

PostPosted: Fri Oct 15, 2010 9:40 pm    Post subject: Tomorrow will be my cheesecake day Reply with quote

I know that the recipe calls for the whole cake to bake on a temperature of 500F for the first ten minutes, but the design of recipe card seems to suggest (in my view) that only the crust bakes on that temperature... or am I mistaken?

I think I will add the sourcream to it, as someone suggested from the Cook's Illustrated recipe. I do notice though that that recipe also calls for much less eggs than this one (and someone above complains that it tasted 'eggy'). Well, we'll see. I just make the CfE-recipe (I'm even going to try to get some heavy cream and graham crackers from the local British store, since normal stores don't sell that here) and maybe later I will adjust. The thing is: I'm a bit nervous making the cake. Yesterday I had cheesecake at the local 'Bakkerswinkel' here in Utrecht, and it was just heavenly. Best cheesecake I ever had. And I have had cheesecake in the Cheesecake Factory. So there you go.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address
Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1005
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Fri Oct 15, 2010 9:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

>>or am I mistaken?
yup. there are two sections in the chart. the top section refers to making and baking the crust - the bottom section is the 'whole thing' - crust and filling.

heavy cream is just that used for whipped cream / schlagtsahne - methinks there's plenty available around Utrecht (g) - all that fluffy white stuff I ate had to come from somewhere . . .
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Majesty



Joined: 05 Jan 2009
Posts: 11
Location: Utrecht, the Netherlands

PostPosted: Sat Oct 16, 2010 3:32 pm    Post subject: Actually I was referring to the second chart Reply with quote

Hi Dilbert,
Thanks for the quick answer, but when I look at the second chart (the one I was talking about), and you look at the bottom ingredient, which is the crust, then the thing saying that it should bake at a temperature of 500degreesF comes from that ingredient. The one after it, baking it at 200F, talks about all the ingredients. There the line is vertical all the way.
Otherwise the lay-out is confusing indeed. Look at the ingredient before the crust, which are the 6 large eggs. The task to mix it in in halves only refers to the eggs, right? Not to all the ingredients.
I'm really pretty sure (saying 'or am I mistaken' was just to come across as modest) that the line before the task to bake at a temperature of 500F should be vertical all the way. That's all.

In the end I bought the Dutch 'slagroom', which has 30% fat, but there is a difference with heavy cream if I can trust Wikipedia which says that heavy cream has a percentage of at least 36%.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address
Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1005
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Sat Oct 16, 2010 5:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

hard to rule out that different browser may be displaying "the chart" differently....

but the bottom line to the recipe is the crust is made and baked "empty" - then the filling is added for the final baking - which of course would include both the crust and the filling....
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1619
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Sat Oct 16, 2010 10:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I just checked the recipe tables in Firefox, Internet Explorer, and Chrome for PC and I'm sorry to say that only firefox is rendering properly right now. I'm traveling right now, but I've made a note to myself to look into fixing this when I return.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Majesty



Joined: 05 Jan 2009
Posts: 11
Location: Utrecht, the Netherlands

PostPosted: Mon Oct 18, 2010 9:23 pm    Post subject: Great cheesecake Reply with quote

Well, whatever the opinion is about the chart, which clearly differs here, the cheesecake turned about absolutely fantastic. I had a bit less creamcheese as planned, due to forgetting one of the cups of creamcheese (a sixth of the total) which I saved with the sourcream that I had bought as well. I did the crust with brown sugar like someone suggested and cooked the vanilla in the cream as someone else suggested. I read the lemonjuice wrong and added instead of 2 teaspoons at least 2 tablespoons. Further I added 250gr of very wet raspberries (I used a box with frozen ones, so when it defrosted it got hugely moist). I figured that the cake would be pretty wet and skipped the added waterbath in the oven.
The cake turned out lovely. It looked lovely (I made pictures - I wish I could add them here) and so it tasted.
And so I ate my first self-made cheesecake ever along the route of the Amsterdam marathon while all the marathoners looked on jealously. The taste of the raspberries I can recommend to everyone who likes them as much as I do and the cake absolutely didn't taste too lemony from the extra juice. Thanks very much for this great recipe!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address
Guest






PostPosted: Mon Nov 15, 2010 6:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mr chu or/and assorted cheese cakers lovers I am in need of your help! Many years ago I had a frozen store bought cheesecake that came with a top layer of gelatine with berries, strawberries or the more delicious blackberry variation. It was very balanced, not sweet but just the right sour taste to go with the rest. The cheesecake filling was clingy but still not gelatinous, and whilte smooth had that subtle sticky "cream cheesegrain" and was more dense that not - it stuck to your tongue. Taste hard to put down, but a sweet, rich mild, perfect flavour. Completely devoid of the dreaded lemon, or overly gelatinebased and light stuff that is the common rule for what can be found locally (I'm in scandinavia).
And with a slightly salty kick from the biscuit base - which wasn't just like dry and crumbly digestive and neither like spongecake, but something inbetween - quite moist. Maybe just wellprepared digestive/biscuits.

Anyyway; I can not hope for you to identify this particular readymade cake, which I am almost sure must have been some recipe sourced globally in a larger chain and put under some brand towards UK/Europe. But what style of cheesecake might it have been?
I am not sure if my vague description is of any use, but who knows. Maybe some idea of where to start? There were no signs of it being baked, no crust. Just yellow-white cheesecake.

Per
Back to top
JaneYokim
Guest





PostPosted: Sun Nov 21, 2010 12:17 am    Post subject: NYCheesecake Reply with quote

No true New York Cheesecake has a graham cracker crust -- it detracts from the pure flavour -- use short dough.
Back to top
Emmayxl



Joined: 22 Nov 2010
Posts: 1
Location: Wyoming, U.S.

PostPosted: Mon Nov 22, 2010 5:51 pm    Post subject: ...Cheesecake Crack... Reply with quote

I'm sure you've heard too much of the cracking, but since I'm still an amateur for cooking, I'd like to have your opinion as to what happened to my cake.

I used half of the ingredient in a 9" spring pan, with glass bottom and steel side. I preheated it to 500F then baked for 8 minutes without fan since I since my cake is half your size and maybe half of your height. The cake looked brown on the edge, and the top looked really puffy but no crack at this point, and it looked white still. Then I reduced it to 200F cracked the door open (I know you said don't do it, but I thought it would help the temp to come down) for a few seconds, then kept the cake there for 1 hour without fan (convection). I think about 30 minutes into the cook I found a huge crack in the middle of the cake, but I kept cooking. Then I took it out and did all the steps you suggested without any problem, the cake didn't further crack during the cooking process and it tasted really really good. The top layer of the cake still looks white, like the original color before I baked it, with just a little dark brown on the edge.

From all the cracking post I read, it sounded like I baked too much in the 500F environment, so that the top solidified too long which caused the top to crack, right? So instead of 500F for 8 minutes, should I reduce to 5 minutes? Or you think it has more to do with I left the door open during the temp transaction from 500F to 200F?

Thank you so much for your post. I love cheesecake and finally found a recipe that makes sense.

Emma
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
pulsefire
Guest





PostPosted: Wed Nov 24, 2010 5:55 pm    Post subject: new York Cheesecake Reply with quote

Let me preface this by saying that Michael Chu must be the devil incarnate. I made this cheesecake for the first time about two years ago and now my daughter will not invite me to dinner unless I bring one. As I write this, the 2010 Thanksgiving version (I think it's the tenth one I've made in two years) has just come out of the oven.
A few things. I have used the ingredients exactly as listed in the original recipe except I've used jumbo eggs instead of large. Don't know if this matters but it works. The optional flour has always gone in and cracking has been held to a minimum. I have cheated on the graham cracker crust by buying a preformed graham cracker pie shell and breaking it up into small pieces before putting it in the springform pan. Crust prebake step is eliminated and it does work.
My changes have been in procedure. First, the order of ingredients doesn't seem to make any difference. The key seems to be time and speed. The mixer should be set at the lowest possible speed to keep air entrainment to a minimum. Bowl scraping is mandatory as, at low speed, much of the cheese will stick to the bowl sides. When baking, resist the temptation to open the oven door for a peek. The full size cheesecake recipe works very well with the times given. PREHEAT to 500 F. BAKE for 10 minutes at 500 F. DECREASE setpoint to 200 F for 100 minutes. DO NOT OPEN THE OVEN TO DROP TEMPERATURE QUICKLY. After the 100 minutes, remove and cover with an INVERTED plate for the first cooling. The inverted plate collects condensate and routes it to the outside of the pan rather than dripping onto the cake. Avoid the temptation to put the cake in the refrigerator for speedier cooling. In fact, leave the cake alone until it's at room temperature, about 4 hours, before refrigeration. Remember that the cake is still cooking for a while while it's cooling, as eggs solidify at 158 F.
With regards to the previous posters-- a TRUE New York JEWISH STYLE cheesecake uses cream cheese and eggs. The original Arnold Reuben recipe (Turf Restaurant) used animal cracker crumbs for the base. A New York ITALIAN STYLE cheesecake uses ricotta cheeses instead of cream cheese. Junior's cheesecake, arguably the best in New York, uses either shortbread or brownie crumbs for the base, depending on if it's a traditional or chocolate cheesecake.
As far as using half the recipe ingredients for a smaller cake, DON'T DO IT as you're changing the thermodynamic properties of the final mass. The smaller cake will cool faster, not allowing the eggs to solidify completely and contracting faster, thereby causing increased cracking. You could probably do it by controlled cooling, dropping the 500 F bake time slightly, then decreasing to 200 F gradually over one hour. I think the cracking was the result of thermal shock with the outside contracting much faster than the inside.
If you're truly concerned about the cracks, make a strawberry or raspberry cheesecake. Follow the recipe, let everything refrigerate, then top with sliced strawberries or raspberries (the frozen ones in sugar syrup), still slightly frozen. The berries will cover the cracks and everyone will love it.
Back to top
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Cooking For Engineers Forum Index -> Comments Forum All times are GMT
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21  Next
Page 17 of 21

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You can reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You can delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group