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Test Recipes: Pan Pizza
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joanlazell
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 23, 2009 12:58 pm    Post subject: Pan/Pizza Reply with quote

I love the recipe. I've worked with yeast before and have had good luck. This time the yeast did not dissolve. I had prewarmed the milk as directed. As I was kneading it and handling it, the dough was not smooth. It was speckled with undissolved yeast. It took longer to rise (I used your method with the preheated/turned off oven). It took about 20 minutes longer. The dough still had undissolved yeast on the surface. It did, however, ultimately dissolve, by the second rising in the pan (I used a 12 inch caste iron skillet and prewarmed the skillet slightly. Ultimately the dough turned out good. It was light and completely baked, not soggy, hwoever, it had a strong taste of yeast. What did I do wrong? Maybe the milk cooled too much by the time I used it. Please advise. Thank you. jl
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Tally
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 04, 2009 8:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I love this recipe, but I'm surprised that it uses olive oil. Olive oil, which is great usually, adds a fruity flavor to the dough that really doesn't taste at all like Pizza Hut. The Pizza Hut website has the ingredients list for their products, and they list Soybean Oil or Cottonseed Oil as their oil of choice, which are both neutrally flavored oils. I used peanut oil the second time I made this recipe, which was much closer to what you get from the restaurant.

Other than that, thanks a lot for this recipe! It really sates that junk-food deep dish pizza urge for much cheaper than ordering out!
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latechef
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 31, 2009 1:12 pm    Post subject: pan pizza recipe Reply with quote

I made the pan pizza recipe and baked the pizza last night. As for ease and taste, the dough was great. I made it in my food processor with the dough blade (I have a heavy duty food processor, don't try that with a little one). I did a double rise in the oven (punching down in between) simply as I had a lot of time to kill.

When I baked them I did load them down, I'll admit, but the crust just wasn't quite done at the thickest part (done in the center but not toward the outside rim on the bottom). I only had 8" cake pans which possibly also caused trouble. I did 22 minutes at 400F - should I raise the temp or lengthen the baking time? Everything else was great, toppings were hot, cheese bubbly, etc. This was honestly the easiest pizza dough recipe I've ever used. Hardly even got my hands dirty.

As for making it more like Pizza Hut pan pizza (also a favorite), you might try some garlic or onion salt in the dough, there is definitely some additional flavor. Also, it could have a lot to do with cooking it in a super-hot professional oven. Like true Chinese food, it's just not possible to obtain that much heat in a home kitchen.
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jamie'smom
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 11, 2009 12:33 pm    Post subject: Pizza sauce Reply with quote

If you are going to make just a couple of pizzas and do not want a lot of leftover sauce, Hunts makes a nice tomato sauce (actual sauce, not paste). It comes in a very small can, about 8 ounces, and it comes in flavors. I like the Basil, Garlic, and Oregano, but I think they have roasted Garlic and other flavors also. I find it is just enough for about 3 small pizzas--and it is very inexpensive.

You can also get real pan pizza pans rather than using cake pans (which have kind of a high side and might mess the crust up a bit. Instawares will sell to the public, though they might be slow in shipping if they don't have an open box to take just a few pans out for your order.

My daughter, the engineer, makes small pizzas from a similar recipe. She does like to pre-brown a bit, and does brush the crust with olive oil first. It is a bit crispy, but since we use a lot of sauce and cheese, it seems to even out in the second baking.
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berkeley student :)
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 10, 2009 1:09 am    Post subject: conversions.... Reply with quote

isn't 330 grams of flour equivalent to about 11.64 ounces which is a little over a 1 1/2 cup of all purpose flour? where does the 2-2/3 cup come in? i really like the sound of your recipe and i'd like to make it as accurately as possible!

thank you Smile
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1619
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Thu Sep 10, 2009 4:42 am    Post subject: Re: conversions.... Reply with quote

berkeley student Smile wrote:
isn't 330 grams of flour equivalent to about 11.64 ounces which is a little over a 1 1/2 cup of all purpose flour? where does the 2-2/3 cup come in? i really like the sound of your recipe and i'd like to make it as accurately as possible!

This is exactly why I measure all flour on a scale. Flour settles and becomes more dense. All flour volume measurements (unless from a prepublished recipe) on this site should be assuming sifted flour - the only way we can get any consistency when measuring flour by volume. Sifted flour is about 140 g per US cup. The flour that comes in a bag at the grocery store is labeled as pre-sifted which is not much use since after sifting it has settled. The total amount of settling depends on length of time and how it was handled. Commonly, you'll see this flour weigh in at 160g to 220g per cup. That makes recipes really hard to replicate since you don't know how much settling was assumed by the recipe writer. I don't know why they don't clarify this in cookbooks - either the author doesn't realize the difference (seems really hard to believe that) or doesn't care (also hard to believe). Pastry cookbooks and baking cookbooks will often specify sifted flour and encourage the use of scales.
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CompSci Engineer
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 18, 2009 12:36 am    Post subject: milk? Reply with quote

I have a similar dough recipe but just use water instead of the milk. I can see how the milk can add a new flavor to the dough, but would there be a big difference if i used whole/2% milk instead of the nonfat? I personally never buy nonfat milk and wouldnt want to buy it just for this recipe. Would it really affect the consistency of the dough a lot?

Love the website btw, keep it up!! Big smile
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KF2LD
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PostPosted: Sat May 22, 2010 1:10 am    Post subject: Test Recipe Reply with quote

I have made this pizza many times and it always tastes great. I think it belongs in the Recipe File, not Test Recipes. Please reconsider.
Thank you for your time.
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Amanda
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 20, 2010 11:45 pm    Post subject: Grid needs work Reply with quote

I loved this recipe the first time I made it, and am making it for the second time tonight. However, the pizzas are in the oven now and I realized I missed the step of the second rise, because it wasn't in the grid.

(My first time through a recipe I work from the detailed directions, and if I decide it gets a second chance, I print the recipe or in your case, just the grid.) So, tonight I made the recipe from the grid, and missed the second rise. I'm sure it will still be edible, just not as fluffy. I made a note on my copy, but you might want to update the grid to show that step!

Love the site and your food reviews on Orthogonal Thought!
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1619
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Thu Jul 22, 2010 5:40 am    Post subject: Re: Grid needs work Reply with quote

Amanda wrote:
I loved this recipe the first time I made it, and am making it for the second time tonight. However, the pizzas are in the oven now and I realized I missed the step of the second rise, because it wasn't in the grid.


Sorry about that! I've fixed the recipe table to reflect the second rise (in the pan).
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Scott
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 06, 2010 10:24 am    Post subject: What happened to my crust? Reply with quote

I've made this recipe many times and it's my favorite homemade crust. Tonight, something went wrong. The crust came out looking beautiful and golden brown as usual, but the texture was all wrong. It was spongy and soft instead of airy and crispy. Any idea what might cause this? Thanks!
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1005
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Fri Aug 06, 2010 12:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

one possibility is a not hot enough bake temp - a preheated bake stone is recommended to help cook the crust evenly

this can also happen with an especially heavy/wet topping 'load'
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lindsbinz
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 12, 2010 3:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great recipe. Tweeted it to my followers & my fiance, who does most of the cooking. He was very appreciative. Smile
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guest
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 25, 2010 8:45 pm    Post subject: 12 inch Reply with quote

how would i make a 12 inch pizza
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 12, 2010 1:39 pm    Post subject: metric conversion Reply with quote

hey, couldn't help but notice an error you made in paragraph 4 - 200 F is closer to 90 degrees centigrade than the 65 degrees you listed.
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