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Equipment & Gear: Kitchen Knives
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 06, 2009 1:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

people, there is a difference between a boning knife and fillet knife. the one he describes is a fillet knife. a boning knife is short with curved blade and is similar in thickness to a chefs knife. also u dont need to spend alot of money on ceramic or fancy knives, my chef bought a dexter chefs knife for 20 dollars 20 years ago, he still uses it and i've used it and it is still very sharp, all u need to know is how to properly maintain your knife. but comfort is also important, and price may need to be sacrificed.
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sscutchen
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 08, 2009 11:55 pm    Post subject: Ken Onion Shun Reply with quote

I wanted to put in a word for the Ken Onion-designed Shun knives. When I decided to buy a Santoku I made sure to try each one I considered in the store to check the fit to my hand and the balance. The Ken Onion handle design just melted into my hand. I know it looks odd. But seriously, no other knife came close. And the blade is Shun quality and beautiful. I've had the knife for 2 years now, and I am still inspired every time I pick it up. I don't mean to imply that this should be everyone's knife, but really do try one for yourself if you are in the market for a new blade. At Amazon
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Guest






PostPosted: Wed Sep 23, 2009 9:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
wanted to put in a word for the Ken Onion-designed Shun knives. When I decided to buy a Santoku I made sure to try each one I considered in the store to check the fit to my hand and the balance. The Ken Onion handle design just melted into my hand. I know it looks odd. But seriously, no other knife came close. And the blade is Shun quality and beautiful. I've had the knife for 2 years now, and I am still inspired every time I pick it up. I don't mean to imply that this should be everyone's knife, but really do try one for yourself if you are in the market for a new blade


I actually tried one of the Shun knives too. I agree, the knife did feel pretty damned good in my hand but I dunno, there was just something about it that didn't feel right with me. I think I'm so used to using my beloved Global Knives anything else seems wrong!

As far as where to buy blades, UK users should check this site: Alliance Online Catering Equipment - their prices are hard to beat.
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Karen
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 09, 2009 7:10 pm    Post subject: Left-handed Shun knives Reply with quote

You've referenced several times that Shun only makes the "D" shaped knives for right-handers, so the left-handed folks are out of luck. This is not the case at all! Shun does make left-handed knives and are available online at most places where Shun knives are sold. Just FYI for any lefties that might be interested Smile
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Guest






PostPosted: Thu Nov 26, 2009 1:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What type of cutlery would you suggest to cut homemade pizzas with (hard, crispy, thin based)?
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1619
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Thu Nov 26, 2009 5:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Anonymous wrote:
What type of cutlery would you suggest to cut homemade pizzas with (hard, crispy, thin based)?

If it's thin and crispy, I just use my chef's knife. For thicker pizzas I use a pizza wheel.
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C. Evans
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PostPosted: Tue Dec 15, 2009 8:08 am    Post subject: Decent Knives Reply with quote

Was looking for a set of knives for the inlaws that aren't too expensive when i found this site and was intrigued on peoples views of different knives i've been a chef for 16 years now and have used many types of chefs knives and have found the best to be either shun or global knives, quite expensive but well worth it


Features of Global kitchen knives

The two most innovative features of Global knives are their edge and the way they are balanced. The most important feature of any knife is its edge, and the Global edge is truly its signature. The majority of the Global knives are sharpened or ground on both sides of the blade, just like Western style knives. However, their edges are ground steeply to a point and to an acute angle. This is in contrast to Western or European knives that use a bevelled edge - the straight edge results in a dramatically sharper knife which stays sharper longer. The edge on a Global knife is so large and prominent that it is easily seen with the naked eye and extends a quarter of an inch or more up from the tip of the knife.

To balance their knives, Global uses a hollow handle which is then filled with just the right amount of sand to create the correct balance. Global uses this method rather than using a full tang and a bolster to balance their knives for two reasons. First, it is far more precise than using a tang and a bolster. Second, Asian knives typically do not have bolsters, since they only serve as a hindrance to cutting and sharpening.

Other unique features of Global knives are their smooth contours and seamless, all stainless steel construction which eliminates food and dirt traps offering the ultimate in safety and hygiene.


How they are made

Global knives are made from the finest high carbon stainless steel available for producing professional quality kitchen knives. Yoshikin uses its own proprietary stainless steel called CROMOVA 18 Stainless Steel and this material has been designed exclusively for Global knives. This steel is hard enough for Global knives to hold the steep, acute cutting edge and keep their edge for a long time...but soft enough so that it is not too difficult to sharpen them. The CRO in CROMOVA 18 stands for chromium and the 18 is the percentage of chromium in the steel. This high percentage of chromium contributes to Global's excellent stain resistance. Care should be taken to keep your Global knives stain and rust free. To learn how to care for your Global knives, please click on the Care Guide button above. The MO and VA in CROMOVA 18 stand for molybdenum and vanadium and these are two metallic elements that give a knife good edge retention.

It is often asked why Global knives stay sharp so long without sharpening. The combination of the elements molybdenum and vanadium is one reason, but also refer back to the diagrams above of the straight edge vs. the beveled edge. Now take a piece of paper and gradually push it up your screen, slowly covering the tips of the two edge types, simulating the knives getting dull after use. Even as the Global straight edge gets dull it is still much thinner, and, therefore, much sharper than the knife with the beveled edge.

I now use these knives permanently Do you get calouses on your hands from using a knife too much, not any more with these no cheap plastic handles and i cant say anything more about these knives they are just pefect
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kman
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 03, 2010 5:35 am    Post subject: serrated or bread knives Reply with quote

I didn't read all the posts so this may have been addressed already
if so sorry for wasting your time.

Bread knives with their larger serrations are ideal for tasks other than their name implies.
My 9" bread knife finds as much use with soft items like tomatoes,loaf cakes, and fresh mozzarella cheese as it does with breads.

so...definitely more useful as a top five than the boning knife
top five most useful in majority of kitchens
chef/santoku
paring
bread
slicer
boning

dont forget the honing steel and correct cutting boards.
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Connie B.
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 07, 2010 8:47 pm    Post subject: Carbon steel kitchen knife Reply with quote

I got a gift for xmas from a guy in Ashland, Oregon who made my a set of carbon steel kitchen knives ( ah, my husband is a gem for this gift ! ) . I was so blown away that I felt to share this , even if no one ever reads this.
Not only do they look good ( my handles have Myrtle wood ) but carbon steel is a real eye opener. I can actually sharpen them here !! Actually the maker, Michael Lishinsky, says they never need sharpening- only a proper light honing. He sent us complete instructions on how to care for the surface and the edge. All I needed to do for a sharpening when it felt dull, was re-hone the edge and it was ready to go . Took 15 seconds .
For the first time ever I feel competent to take care of my knives. The surface has taken on a dark patina, and I simply wipe them off after I use them. I got a 9 inch, a 1.5 x 7 and a 1 x 4. Highly recommended to any and all. His site is wildfirecutlery.com
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sharpknives



Joined: 08 Feb 2010
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Mon Feb 08, 2010 2:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

In my home i usually used the Steak Knife (Dining Knife) because this is very much useful in cooking.
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Jackie
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 18, 2010 6:42 pm    Post subject: choking up on my knife Reply with quote

Hello, I seem to choke up on my knife handle and it winds up being painful on my index finger due to that being on the top side of the blade. Is there a knife out there that is made for people like me?
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1006
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Thu Feb 18, 2010 7:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

sometimes manufacturers leave 'sharp' edges on the spine -

I've used emery cloth to round over the edges on my chef's knives - only the fist 2-3 inches from the handle - helps make the choke grip 'less painful'
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jackie
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 18, 2010 7:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you I will give that a try.
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Marky T
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 14, 2010 10:44 am    Post subject: Personal Choice Reply with quote

Globals are great performers, but they do have a delicate edge, and they are quite expensive too.

But they're not as fragile as true Japanese kitchen knives, on the other hand those cut a lot better compared to Globals and western knives and stay sharper much longer. So its personal preference. ( and budget )
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HomeUser
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 27, 2010 7:52 pm    Post subject: Kiwi knives Reply with quote

I'm happy someone mentioned Kiwi knives! I bought a vegetable knife for $3.99 in chinese store. The wooden handle looks and feels cheap, but the blade is awesome! Cuts through any vegetable like butter.
It sharpens up and retains edge pretty well too. I am so happy with the purchase!
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