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Kitchen Notes: Making Butter
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Momgenet
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 01, 2010 8:06 pm    Post subject: Problems making butter? Reply with quote

I just found this page ! I think it is interesting that people are talking about problems making butter. Or stating that it is difficult to make butter from raw cream. Perhaps engineers think to much? LOL!
I have been making butter for MONTHS with raw cream. Yes, even the first skimming! I have Jersey/Guernsey mixed cows. I let the cream come to room temperature. I either let my kids shake in a jar or use my stand mixer. I have butter in anywhere from 10 minutes to an hour depending on who is doing what. I have never had a batch fail. I've never had to add lemon juice or any other additive. I do KNOW it needs to be at room temp. and you CAN NOT make butter from milk-- soy milk, evaporated milk or ANY KIND of milk. It needs to be high fat containing cream!
I even put different flavoring in the final product, such as fresh herbs or garlic! YUM! Enjoy!
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doc
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 27, 2010 11:25 pm    Post subject: didn't work Reply with quote

I tried this method and my mixture went from thickening to just yellow liquid in a matter of seconds. There was never any chance to pour off buttermilk and just have butter.
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1617
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Sun Mar 28, 2010 9:09 am    Post subject: Re: didn't work Reply with quote

doc wrote:
I tried this method and my mixture went from thickening to just yellow liquid in a matter of seconds. There was never any chance to pour off buttermilk and just have butter.

Keep beating the yellow liquid. The stuff making the liquid look yellow (fat clusters) should start to clump up and form a solid mass.
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doc
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 28, 2010 4:38 pm    Post subject: good save Reply with quote

Michael,

Thanks, that's roughly what I ended up doing, but the mixture didn't change much except that some fat gathered at the top. I assumed that since I was using a blender, the mixing was going too fast to allow the fat to coagulate. So I decided to just let it sit for a while, and in about 90 minutes, I had a much thicker product. At that point, a little agitation with a spoon separated the buttermilk, which I poured off. After rinsing what was left, I had butter!
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1617
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Sun Mar 28, 2010 9:17 pm    Post subject: Re: good save Reply with quote

doc wrote:
Michael,

Thanks, that's roughly what I ended up doing, but the mixture didn't change much except that some fat gathered at the top. I assumed that since I was using a blender, the mixing was going too fast to allow the fat to coagulate. So I decided to just let it sit for a while, and in about 90 minutes, I had a much thicker product. At that point, a little agitation with a spoon separated the buttermilk, which I poured off. After rinsing what was left, I had butter!

Yeah, this doesn't work in a blender. The blender tends to break the fats up and evenly distribute it through the liquid - setting you back just about as fast it it brings the butter together! Stand mixer seems to be best followed by food processor.
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papamarc37
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 12, 2010 3:45 pm    Post subject: butter w/mason jar and where 2 get heavy cream Reply with quote

When you're using a jar to make butter, I find it works best to use room temperature cream and only fill the jar 25% full (at the most). It may take more batches, but the butter forms very quickly. Re-use the jar without rinsing for quicker subsequent batches.
Coffe shops and restaurant will often give you expired or about to expire cream free just for asking. I get 3-4 cases of heavy cream from the coffee shop at the ski resort where i live at the end of every season. It easily makes enough butter for the entire year for my family.
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Betsmoore
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PostPosted: Thu May 06, 2010 7:16 pm    Post subject: Making Butter - I have fresh, raw milk from a Farm Reply with quote

I think I will try to use the method, except for the raw milk and a hand mixer. I do not have a standing mixer. Will regular beaters work?
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1617
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Thu May 06, 2010 7:30 pm    Post subject: Re: Making Butter - I have fresh, raw milk from a Farm Reply with quote

Betsmoore wrote:
I think I will try to use the method, except for the raw milk and a hand mixer. I do not have a standing mixer. Will regular beaters work?

Anything that agitates the cream will work. Raw milk probably won't work unless you let it settle and use the cream portion (and then let that sit and use only the cream from that).
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Phalini
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 15, 2010 8:52 pm    Post subject: culturing cream, then churning butter Reply with quote

Michael, I read all the comments. It took me a while. But I got some courage to try, try again. I have been trying to learn how to make cultured butter. I succeeded once, and failed three times. Can you tell me what I'm doing wrong? First, I skim off the cream from fresh cow's milk. Next, I heat the cream until little bubbles start to form around the edge of the pot, then I turn it off. I allow it to cool till I can hold my finger in it for 25 seconds. Then I stir in some live yogurt culture and set it up to ferment for eight hours. I then cool it to room temperature, pour it in a deep, stainless steel bowl, and beat it with an electric hand-mixer. The first time I did it, I got beautiful butter and yummy buttermilk. The second, third and fourth times, different things happened, but nothing like what I wanted to happen. I need a step-by-step tutorial on how to culture the cream and how to churn it (I don't have a butter-churn, but I do have an East Indian wooden hand-"dasher." I am starting to feel like Thomas Edison with all my experimentation that keeps failing, but I also have his stubborn determination to learn the right way to make a light-bulb.
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1617
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Tue Jun 15, 2010 11:29 pm    Post subject: Re: culturing cream, then churning butter Reply with quote

Phalini wrote:
The second, third and fourth times, different things happened, but nothing like what I wanted to happen.

You didn't explain what went wrong... hard to debug without knowing the problem. The only thing I'd suggest at this point is to allow the cream you skimmed off to sit and settle - then skim off the cream that forms there. The first skimming usually doesn't have enough fat to make butter easily. As for the culturing part - I would use a thermometer instead of the bubble/finger technique.
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slavic beauty
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 18, 2010 11:30 am    Post subject: making butter Reply with quote

There is special equipment available to make your own cream and butter at home.
It's portable and easy to use.
Cream separators electric and manual , manual cream separator w/ butter churn attachment, butter churns.

Please visit this site for details:
http://slavicbeauty.ecrater.com/

please email me should you have any questions:

uabookinist@yahoo.com
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Lee
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 18, 2010 9:38 pm    Post subject: Raw Milk Sources Reply with quote

Sources for raw milk and cream in your area can be found at www.realmilk.com
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mpaget99
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 07, 2010 11:11 pm    Post subject: making butter Reply with quote

The technical. Buy Heavy Whipping Cream at the market. I buy 4 quarts. Put all into the freezer for use when you need. When you are making butter, pull 1 out, defrost in a bowl of water. Pour into your mixing bowl and let sit until bowl is not cold.
The cream is already seperated at this point.
When you start the directions start at a slow speed, but skip the peaks, you will butter in a matter of minutes.
My total whipping time is less than 10 minutes. It takes longer to clean up than make butter.
Enjoy and don't be afraid of trying something new. It's just a quart of cream!!!
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Bladerunner
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PostPosted: Sun Aug 29, 2010 7:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've been making my own butter for the last year or so. I use heavy cream in a quart-size Mason jar. I fill the jar about 1/4 of the way and shake till the cream breaks, and the butter is sloshing around in the buttermilk. At that point, I pour everything into a sieve over a bowl and squish the butter around a little bit to get more buttermilk off. Then I take the butter out of the sieve and put it into another bowl, and squish the butter around a bunch more with a big wooden spoon or a spatula over the sieve & bowl. The buttermilk gets saved for baking, and the butter goes into molds of some sort and they go into the freezer till I'm ready to use them.

I've been using small Tupperware containers for everyday molds, and I have a couple of plastic soap/candle molds for when I want the butter to look a bit fancier at the dinner table. I also recently bought some wooden butter molds from the late 1800s or so from an antique store - haven't gotten around to using them just yet.

The butter might not taste significantly better than store-bought, but I like having made it myself. Just like having made my own bread and jam. Even if the final product is similar to what I would've bought, I still have control over what goes into it, how it was made, and the satisfaction of having done it myself. I've learned bunches about physics and chemistry by researching and executing these sorts of projects for myself, which is pretty cool too.

Not too long ago, I tried using my Kitchen-Aid to make butter. I needed a bunch for cooking, and I'd run out of hand-shook butter. Yeah, it made butter in a snap, but after months of shaking it myself by hand, it kinds felt like cheating. I hadn't set any rules for myself, and it's not like anyone else was judging what I was doing, but it was kind of disappointing. In the last week, I've done a ton of baking. I've had to remember to plan ahead and make enough butter for everything I want to bake, and have enough leftover for any other cooking I need to do (like breakfast and dinner!). I'm slowly learning to make more things for myself, and the more I do so, the happier I've become with my cooking - and even my eating.

Your Mileage May Vary.
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motherofmany13
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 26, 2011 1:25 am    Post subject: butter from raw milk Reply with quote

I liked your article on butter making but am having a bit of a problem. Our 15 yr old bought a dairy cow 2 months ago. It gives great milk and we have been using the cream for butter but seems to have a rancid smell. We do the washing out of the buttermilk and try to be careful and clean with it all but cannot seem to get rid of the flavor/smell. Someone said it is kind of a parmesan cheese smell and normal but it sure does not seem to be good tasting. Are we doing something wrong? I cannot seem to find an answer on the web but came across your site and hoped you would have an answer.
Thanks!
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