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Recipe File: Basic Biscuits
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jeanie
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 10, 2009 12:11 am    Post subject: cast iron cooked scones Reply with quote

I am looking for a scones receipe that is made in a cast iron skillet..greatgrandmother was from dundee, scotland and aunts..........this is how they made them.............plain no currents etc........cut into triangles...please help me........also buttermilk or sour milk[/b]
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sharoni
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 04, 2010 1:56 pm    Post subject: biscuits... scones... wotevs! Reply with quote

I use a similar recipe for making scones and I either bake them or griddle them on a cast iron griddle... thingy... which I guess could be substituted with a skillet, the only difference is I sometimes try to make an effort in making my scones just a little bit thinner if I am gonna griddle them, but not really coz I am quite lazy like that.

As for what you want to call them I'm from Australia and I have traveled to a few states in the U.S and to some of the UK. Australia and the UK are very similar in their ideas and theories about scones, cookies, biscuits and rock cakes and I have to agree with what anon said earlier that what Americans call scones the rest of us call rock cakes. What you call biscuits we call scones. What we call biscuits/shortbread you call cookies/shortbread, and what we call cookies are usually only cookies that are round with a rough surface like oatmeal cookies or chocolate chip as far as I know.

In any case it doesn't really matter coz it's these very differences that makes travelling there exciting. If I wanted the same old biscuits I'd just stay home Wink
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Joe
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 07, 2010 3:56 pm    Post subject: Biscuits, Scones, Cookies, Crackers, etc. Reply with quote

With all due respect, I have lived, cooked, and eaten on six continents and there is much misinformation out there and on this site. American biscuits vary significantly from scones and are not even close to UK biscuits, which are closer to American cookies and crackers. In the USA, buttermilk biscuits are very common and are indigenous to the South, where vegetable shortening or lard are also standard ingredients. Scones and biscuits in the UK are delicious also, but are made and eaten in a very different way than in the USA. The use of so much milk and butter in this recipe may make a delicious bread item, but it is neither a true UK biscuit nor American biscuit.
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kk1101
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 28, 2010 8:08 pm    Post subject: different cooking speeds etc in different places Reply with quote

Someone said that in Germany their biscuits burn on the bottom when they didn't in the USA. I wonder if it's the altitude. I once had a cookbook that told you slight differences to make if you lived above or below sea level.
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 07, 2010 6:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

For the slow...

Scones generally have a slightly greater dry to liquid ratio than biscuits and most times include egg giving it a more course or heavier texture than a biscuit. If you eat/make scones and disagree, you have no idea how to make a scone and you've been eating/making biscuits all along. I don't care where you live.
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Jen
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 11, 2010 2:09 pm    Post subject: bisuits in skillet Reply with quote

I have always lived in the South, and never heard of anyone making biscuits in a iron skillet or griddle. I would love to try it! But since I'm inexperienced with this cooking method, what do I put in the skillet before the biscuits so they don't stick? Oil, shortening, butter....?
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 972
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Thu Feb 11, 2010 2:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

corn bread and also biscuit is pretty standard fare for cooking in cast iron.

either in an open pan - or some biscuit recipes specify a dutch oven.

use a bit oil, butter, take your pick. if the cast iron is properly seasoned it won't require much fat. preheat the cast iron
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DoireJO
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 14, 2010 3:07 pm    Post subject: Cookie,Biscuit, Scones Reply with quote

Tell me this...is a Jaffa cake a Biscuit??
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 972
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Sun Mar 14, 2010 3:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

depends on what flavor of english you use.

see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jaffa_Cakes
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amandanico
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PostPosted: Sun May 16, 2010 5:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ive usually made my 'biscuits' with margarine and 2% milk *gasp*(just whatever I have in the fridge) And am always happy with the results, they dont puff up very high but are always crisp and flakey, and just the way I like them. Its true our personal tastes are all different and for someone to say 'their' way is more right than someone elses is just not reasonable. Everyone has there own special recipes that remind them of home, and this is mine. Specially when I add oodles of aged cheddar cheese into the dough after cutting in the fat. Yum Yum.
I just dont know why so many of you have to get so bent out of shape about what we are calling what and if its 'right' or not. RELAX, there are much bigger issues in this world!
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JoanneOf Hayseed
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PostPosted: Tue May 18, 2010 2:13 pm    Post subject: lol...Great comments Reply with quote

After reading through these comments, it never ceases to amaze me the things that people enjoy - or the things that induce pride.

Having come from mixed parentage (father a yank, mother from the rural area around Glasgow), and being raised on a fairly large dairy farm, I grew up with a mixture of Old World and New World cuisine. Mum used to make the lightest scones I have ever had, but learned to make the humble biscuit of the colonies. Also, as both of my parents were from farm stock, Mum never liked to buy bread and the like, preferring to bake her own. After all, she had my sister and I to help her out while pater and my brothers were out in the fields.

I believe that a lot of the reason for scones being reduced to the humble "biscuit" of the colonies was that for many, especially in the early colonial days, sugar was not all that available and a lot of the settlers did not have easy access to many of the things that were so readily available in the port cities, both in New England and the Gulf states. This would include sugar syrup and a few other things.

Two things to suggest here. The first being, if one uses buttermilk, reduce the baking powder by about 1/2 teaspoon. The acidity of the buttermilk will cause the baking soda to begin to react even before it is subjected to the oven. This will also reduce the sodium level in the biscuits a bit. Important if one is hypertensive. The second is to have the oven well preheated and to keep all of the bi9scuits the same size going in, to insure even baking.

Regardless of terminology and preferences, biscuits are a really nice break from the normal toast that is all so common with breakfast. Also, if one is willing to try something different, the suggestion to make sausage gravy to serve over one's biscuits is a really nice change of pace and a great start to a day. Especially in cold weather or on days where a lot of heavy activity is planned. However one likes them, with butter, clotted cream and jam, honey, gravy or whatever, these light, fluffy little breads make a great addition to any meal.
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Anonymouse
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PostPosted: Sat May 22, 2010 6:35 pm    Post subject: For engineers, eh? Reply with quote

If this is for engineers, why is there no picture of the final end product?
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 972
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Sat May 22, 2010 7:28 pm    Post subject: Re: For engineers, eh? Reply with quote

Anonymouse wrote:
If this is for engineers, why is there no picture of the final end product?


because engineers use drawings, not pictures [g]
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1606
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Sun May 23, 2010 12:16 am    Post subject: Re: For engineers, eh? Reply with quote

Anonymouse wrote:
If this is for engineers, why is there no picture of the final end product?

When I wrote this one up, I was actually making the biscuits for a topping to the Chicken Pot Pie article... so, no final biscuit photo. I'm working on a new biscuit recipe and will definitely have all the photos when I get ready to commit that to the Recipe File.
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 14, 2010 6:57 pm    Post subject: Biscuit history Reply with quote

For the history of biscuit recipes in America, see
http://www.westernexplorers.us/Biscuits_Crackers_Hard_Tack_2010_SKWier.pdf
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