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Recipe File: Buttercream Frosting (American)
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JoePreservative
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 28, 2009 1:16 am    Post subject: How long does buttercream last in the fridge... Reply with quote

Um, I don't get this.

Martha Stewart's Feb 2009 Living magazine, says buttercream will keep for 3 days in the fridge.

her formula is Butter and sifted confectioner's sugar.

Butter is fat - a preservative which I have never, ever witnessed going rancid.

Sugar is a preservative.

How can you only get 3 days out of 2 combined preservatives?

I accidentally seasoned my dansken kitchen clogs with salt, and am afraid that they will be around 3000 years from now, as salt is also a great preservative.
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1626
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Wed Jan 28, 2009 3:29 am    Post subject: Re: How long does buttercream last in the fridge... Reply with quote

JoePreservative wrote:
Martha Stewart's Feb 2009 Living magazine, says buttercream will keep for 3 days in the fridge.

her formula is Butter and sifted confectioner's sugar.

If those are her only two ingredients, then I'm pretty certain it will last a lot longer than 3 days in the fridge. They're just being careful over there.

Butter can go rancid if left out especially in humid environments, but it takes quite some time in the fridge.
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melissa
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 06, 2009 4:21 am    Post subject: Best Ever Reply with quote

Zoot alors, I've become a Francophile! Having always been an Italian buttercream fan, now I've gone over to the frog-side. I'm still licking my fingers! Delicious and GREAT pics--made it super simple. Thank you, or I guess I should say "merci beaucoup mon ami de cuisine!"
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nightmoon
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 09, 2009 5:33 pm    Post subject: cold or room temp butter? Reply with quote

I made this a couple of months ago and it was awesome. Thanks so much. But... I forget if i used cold butter or room temp butter. (And they say the memory is the last to go, NOT.) Anyway could someone refresh me please?

Also, my friend's favorite frosting is peanut butter. Do you all think i could substitute the butter with peanut butter? If I get daring enough to try this i will certainly let you know how it goes. Thanks again,
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1626
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Mon Mar 09, 2009 5:43 pm    Post subject: Re: cold or room temp butter? Reply with quote

nightmoon wrote:
I made this a couple of months ago and it was awesome. Thanks so much. But... I forget if i used cold butter or room temp butter. (And they say the memory is the last to go, NOT.) Anyway could someone refresh me please?

The butter should be cold, but not rock hard. If it's room temperature, it should be okay, but it shouldn't be on the verge of melting.
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monocon
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 26, 2009 4:59 pm    Post subject: Dense buttercream Reply with quote

I made a swiss merengue buttercream the evening before last, which I felt turned out beautifully, but after refrigerating the frosted cupcakes (and then leaving them out for a few hours the next day, which I thought would soften the buttercream up again), the buttercream seemed dense and heavy. I used a recipe that called for heating sugar/egg whites, whipping 10 minutes (to cool), before whipping in the butter/vanilla. Is there another way to make swiss merengue so that it doesn't change consistancy after refrigeration? Or will at least, return to it's original consistancy? Is it possible that I overwhipped it? Thanks a bunch!
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california cook
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 14, 2009 4:33 am    Post subject: buttercream recipe Reply with quote

I made this icing (with the addition of melted Belgian chocolate) and had great results! It was smooth and shiny and not too buttery. For those who think it tastes like they smeared butter on their cake - are you using FRESH, UNSALTED butter? It can make a big difference.
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icing freak
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 14, 2009 11:17 am    Post subject: buttercream icing/flour recipe etc Reply with quote

thanku to all u guys who put ure recipes on here!! am gonna go now n try the flour recipe, just a q, do u think the flour n egg n butter milk recipe would be a good icing for a carrot cake?
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 25, 2009 3:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi, I just found your wonderful site! I am new to cake decorating (i'm at the "eat, drink and sleep-cake decorating" stage), and I have a question about royal icing. I like to use royal icing because it is so stable, but since it can't touch oil, it starts to "dissolve" when placed onto the top or sides of my buttercream. How do I get around that problem?
On another subject, I love the flour/milk buttercream. It's our favorite tasting icing, however, yesterday I used it to fill and ice a 3-layer cake. This icing doesn't work well for decorating, so I just made some butter/shortening type icing to decorate with. The side decorations kept sliding down, so I salvaged it by scraping off all the flour/milk icing, and replaced it with the butter/shortening recipe. This icing doesn't taste as good but it was okay, but by the time I got to the party the oil in the icing was begining to look "wet". Please tell me what frosing people put beneath royal icing. One more question; how much buttercream should go under fondant, and do most people peel the fondant off? Is it mostly for appearance? Thank you for these answers. I have parkinsons, and can't be involved in a regular class, but its a wonderful hobby, and it helps my mind and body keep going.
Thanks again for your help.
Janice
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Elle
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 12, 2009 7:35 am    Post subject: Buttercream frosting Reply with quote

For anyone who is going to culinary school, they should be teaching you in the French tradition. If they are, then you should be taught the French buttercream recipe in your baking and pastry course. French buttercream uses whole eggs. American versions use the whites. I am a professional chef who was taught in the French tradition but my Master Chef taught us both. I am also of French dissent and from New Orleans and buttercream there is the French recipe.
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Pamela Pither
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 11, 2009 10:38 am    Post subject: American Butter Cream - with raw flour??? Reply with quote

I've found a super cup cake recipe I want to make today. However....
the frosting recipe says

6tbsp plain flour
440 ml milk
450g unsilted butter, softened
450g sugar
2 tsp vanilla extract.

Instructions mix together the ingredients and apply the icing.

I've never seen a recipe before that used uncooked flour.

Please can someone confirm this to be correct and safe.
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 11, 2009 5:30 pm    Post subject: Another question on icing safety Reply with quote

Greetings.

I have searched and searched (and searched) on the net for a clear answer as to how long a buttercream - french/egg yolk type - can be kept at room temp without worry of poisoning to friends and acquaintances. As I understand, cake responds very poorly to refrigeration, causing it to dry out (whereas its molecules apparently do well with freezing and won't cause a sense of dryness upon thawing). I'm therefore not eager to put my cake in the fridge, even if I can bring it to room temp before serving. I certainly think I have experienced the dry fridge effect and it's not nice.

So... if I make and ice a cake with french buttercream in the morning and leave it at room temp all day on a non-summer's day, is this cake safe to eat in the evening? If I then put the leftovers in the fridge, how many days can I "enjoy" the dry leftovers before poisoning would occur?

Do cake shops that sell slices (or cupcakes) keep their wares in refrigerated cases???

If I wanted to be really safe and ice a cake with an icing that has no eggs, can anyone suggest a recipe that's not as sickly sweet as the powdered sugar icing (the typical one which has a pound of sugar and 1/2 pound butter)?

Thanks so much for your help!!

An American in London
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1012
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Sun Oct 11, 2009 7:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

from
http://www.baking911.com/pantry/storage_baked_goods.htm

Buttercream frosting made with butter, confectioners' sugar, flavorings and liquid are safe to eat if stored in a cool place outside of the refrigerator for 2 - 3 days. You can crumb coat the cake with buttercream the night before and then frost and decorate it the next day and serve that evening without a problem. Powdered sugar buttercream icings made with fat freeze well. Cakes frosted with Meringue-based buttercreams freeze well, too.

as a generality, uncooked eggs:
Perishable frostings and fillings - contains dairy and uncooked eggs, except for butter Refrigerator - 2 to 3 days (For best results, whipped cream and a few others must be served immediately or within a few hours)

cooked egg types are okay 2-3 days at room temp.
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 13, 2009 2:09 pm    Post subject: Great news - are you sure?! Reply with quote

Thanks so much for coming back on my query about longetivity at room temp of egg icings! That's just great news.

As I'm such a paranoid I just want to double-check -- would we count an icing as a 'cooked egg' icing wherein a hot sugar solution is poured into yolks and then this new mixture is cooked on a gentle boil for two minutes?

To that end, I've always been told to be wary of cream cheese sandwiches left out more than a couple of hours. Is this true? How about cream cheese icings? How long are they safe out for? Does the sugar in them hold back on the development of unsafe bacteria so even these icings can be left out a day or two? I need hard facts!!

Finally, I'm still open to and looking for sans-egg icing ideas that don't involve four whole cups of confectioners (powdered) sugar for a 9" cake. So I'd still be most delighted for any ideas from people.

Thanks again from the American in London.
x
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1012
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Tue Oct 13, 2009 3:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

salmonella is the major issue with uncooked eggs - it's killed at 131'F/55'C - so if you want to be super safe, you can check the temp of the cooking mix to ensure you exceed that.

when you are using processed products - like cream cheese - one could presume the processing/etc has killed any salmonella bacteria - the recommendations for non-refrigerated storage times are precautionary in that respect - however 'better safe than sorry' does apply. . . for stuff like sandwiches, altho the cream cheese itself may be 'sterile' & safe, other ingredients could carry salmonella bacteria and 'contaminate' the dairy product - which is a fertile breeding ground for bacterial.

high sugar content does retard bacterial growth - think of jams & jellies...
but diary products are an ideal growth media for bacteria - hence raw dairy anything must be properly handled and stored.
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