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Recipe File: Dark Chocolate Souffle
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1620
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Fri Apr 10, 2009 8:25 pm    Post subject: Re: No heavy cream Reply with quote

Majesty wrote:
In Holland (where I live) they don't sell heavy cream (well, maybe the occasional British shop in the occasional big city). Can I also use normal 'whipping' cream, which contains 30% fat?

As long as you can whip the cream up, you can use it.
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Majesty



Joined: 05 Jan 2009
Posts: 11
Location: Utrecht, the Netherlands

PostPosted: Fri Apr 10, 2009 10:32 pm    Post subject: Re: re: no heavy cream Reply with quote

Thanks for your quick reply. I didn't know that heavy cream, which has much more fat, could so easily be replaced with the other cream.
Just want to ask my other question again. I grained some almonds yesterday, thinking I was going to use them for another recipe, but in the end I decided I wanted to try the recipe from this site. I'm just wondering if anyone knows what the effect will be of adding 100 grams of grained almonds. They are pretty well grained, although I wouldn't call it 'super fine'. It's not like flour. The almonds seem pretty fat, I read. 54 grams per 100 grams is fat.
Does that mean that I have to add less butter for instance?
I can imagine that the contents would become too heavy to rise up (to the occasion) and become a soufflé. But I'm happy with a chocolatepuddingy thing as well, as long as it's tasty.
Anyone willing to speculate if it will work? Monday morning (Sunday night for you) I'm going to make them.
Happy Easter!
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Socalone
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 27, 2009 9:35 pm    Post subject: Thanks for this :) Reply with quote

I just made these! They came out great Big smile

I literally have 10 ramekins left over from the Trader Joes 2pk frozen chocolate souffle. My goal was to stop buying from TJs and make my own.
Well, this recipe is perfect. This recipe will fill 4 TJ souffle cups.

Such a simple yet tasty recipe! And I'm saving money. Thanks so much.
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PostPosted: Sun May 10, 2009 6:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is a good recipe. The best sauce I have had with a soufle is Creme Angalise. It is a great balance to the deep choc taste and is served cold which balances the hot of the soufle.
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Djsivy
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 03, 2009 8:00 am    Post subject: Made recipe with 2-quart ramekin Reply with quote

I multiplied the recipe by 3, poured the entire batter into a 2-quart ramekin (buttered and sugared as per the recipe), and cooked it at 375 for just under 40 minutes. The crust came out perfectly (imho), and the center was custardy. I made some blueberry frozen yogurt to go with it, and spooned it out to a crowd of 8 people (after the initial dramatic presentation of a beautifully risen souffle, of course). Very good recipe - thank you!
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Porcellana
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PostPosted: Sun Aug 16, 2009 4:06 pm    Post subject: I loved it! Reply with quote

The soufflés turned out great! I am very grateful for this easy to follow break-down of the recipe. Thank you, Michael. I posted a longer note on my experience with the soufflé and added some pictures of the results here:
http://www.facebook.com/note.php?note_id=115198632973&ref=mf
All the best, Yordanka
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1620
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Sun Aug 16, 2009 6:22 pm    Post subject: Re: I loved it! Reply with quote

Porcellana wrote:
The soufflés turned out great! I am very grateful for this easy to follow break-down of the recipe. Thank you, Michael. I posted a longer note on my experience with the soufflé and added some pictures of the results here:
http://www.facebook.com/note.php?note_id=115198632973&ref=mf
All the best, Yordanka

Hi Yordanka,
Posting links to Facebook doesn't work for most people unless you change the permissions on your content to viewable by "Everyone".
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Porcellana
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 20, 2009 9:19 am    Post subject: Facebook Reply with quote

Really strange, because I did change it! We check again. Thanks for the note.
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Porcellan
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 20, 2009 9:49 am    Post subject: Re: I loved it! Reply with quote

Hi Michael, since FB doesn't seem to work I posted my note her http://yordankaevgenieva.blogspot.com/

Thanks again,
Yordanka
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beginer-home-chef
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 21, 2009 3:44 am    Post subject: OHHHH! Reply with quote

Oh! My gosh, I'm a beginer on cook and this chocolate suffle didn't let me down. My husband is always my taste texter and he just loved he said that was the best thing that he ever eaten. Thank you so much. All the step by step and the pictures helped me sooo much.
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Karen
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 06, 2009 4:50 am    Post subject: Prepping the Mold Reply with quote

I interned in a kitchen, and actually, prepping the mold with butter and sugar DOES help with rising of the souffle. When you prep appropriately (butter, sugar, and freeze molds if you can), the souffle will rise nicely without cracking. When you don't prep, it will still rise, but not as dramatically. Will still taste great too, so prep mold if you want to have a dramatic souffle!

By the way, I love this website, keep it up!!!
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Burgess Shale
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 07, 2009 11:40 pm    Post subject: Falling Souffle Reply with quote

Love the site.

About comments near the beginning: I've been thinking about souffles, and as near as I can figure, the real problem is that a souffle is puffed up by hot air and water vapor. It's only a matter of time before the air contracts and the vapor condenses, causing the souffle to deflate.

In bread, this doesn't seem to be as much of a problem; I'm guessing it's because (a) breads use leavening agents, like yeast or baking powder, and (b) the gluten web is really sturdy. Yeast breads are permitted to rise for a while, as well.

With this in mind, I tried to make a German/ Baby Dutch pancake (which is souffle-like) with some baking powder. Although I used a small amount and mixed it in thoroughly, it affected the taste, and the thing really didn't puff up that well.

Thinking about the problem, I can think of possible solutions:

1) Add an ingredient that will evaporate, sublime, or deliquesce, thus expanding and leaving a gas pocket. Powdered dry ice might achieve this, but is likely to significantly foul up cooking. Baking powder is supposed to deliquesce, but it leaves nasty-tasting salts behind. Ammonium acetate? Prob. not... Note that English steamed puddings use a similar strategy: small bits of tallow melt as the pudding sets, leaving voids behind.

2)Keep it really hot, which may hinder eating, or

3) quickly replace the hot air and water with something that will not collapse. This last bit would make the souffle into a sort of aerogel. This could perhaps be achieved by flushing the souffle with supercritical acetone and/or carbon dioxide at temperatures high enough to avoid collapse. Using supercritical water would be inadvisable, as it is a strong oxidant and would make fats in the souffle go rancid. (Of course, the other solvents have their own problems with edibility and taste!)

-BS
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Guest






PostPosted: Sun Dec 06, 2009 4:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I looked at so many chocolate souffle recipes, not sure if I could make it for the meal I was planning. Was there a way to make them ahead of time, or at least do most of the work ahead of time? Everything said serve immediately, but I couldn't serve dessert first or leave in the middle of dinner to go make some souffles either. Thank you for being so clear!
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Nisha
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PostPosted: Sat Jan 02, 2010 6:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wow, thanks a lot! I'm not an engineer - far from it, I'm a language teacher! - but I think this site is brilliant! Going to try out your recipes ASAP Smile
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quarkz



Joined: 06 Feb 2010
Posts: 4

PostPosted: Sat Feb 06, 2010 3:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi,

How should i adjust the oven time or temperature if I'm going to just make 1 serving? As for the ingredients, do I just divide by 2?

Thanks alot!
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