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Thermostatically controlled electric element for cold smokin

 
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DrBiggles



Joined: 12 May 2005
Posts: 355
Location: Richmond, CA

PostPosted: Wed Sep 03, 2008 12:23 am    Post subject: Thermostatically controlled electric element for cold smokin Reply with quote

Hey,

Am in the last stretch of building my own cold smoker.

http://www.cyberbilly.com/meathenge/archives/001356.html

This last weekend brought it to 211 and back to 127 using an electric hotplate with dual 800 watt burners. With 1 burner set to LOW, couldn't bring it below 127 with an ambient temp of 82. Am going to attempt to rewire the rig in series to see if I can get more control.

But would rather have a thermostatically controlled electric element that I could just put in to place and make go. I've been to the usual places and thought someone here might have an idea as to where to actually find a unit I can drop in to place.

?

Biggles

ps - 110, no 220
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IndyRob



Joined: 17 Dec 2006
Posts: 77

PostPosted: Fri Sep 05, 2008 2:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I wonder if you could use something like a crock pot. They do self-regulate temps, but usually with water. But it seems like, with some experimentation, you could land in the relatively wide range you're looking for (90-120F) without liquid.

Another option may be light bulbs. You could vary the temp by changing the number and wattage of the bulbs. But no self regulation involved here.
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1013
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Fri Sep 05, 2008 11:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

have you thought about using a thermostat proper? I used one with a remote sensing bulb - bulb inside cabinet, control dial outside cabinet, hair dryer provided the heat (seed starting cabinet)

you need to watch for how much amperage the contacts will handle and avoid the need for a relay if possible.

this is a fairly heavy duty model (24 amps)
http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/wwg/itemDetailsRender.shtml?ItemId=1611760764
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DrBiggles



Joined: 12 May 2005
Posts: 355
Location: Richmond, CA

PostPosted: Fri Sep 05, 2008 8:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

IndyRob wrote:
I wonder if you could use something like a crock pot. They do self-regulate temps, but usually with water. But it seems like, with some experimentation, you could land in the relatively wide range you're looking for (90-120F) without liquid.

Another option may be light bulbs. You could vary the temp by changing the number and wattage of the bulbs. But no self regulation involved here.


Yeah, but, I'm thinking I'll need something more durable than a consumer grade home appliance. Remember, this thing will be running for 48 hours non-stop. Light bulbs or no (I do like the idea though), I need something that can stand up to being on for 2 days and automated.

Biggles
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DrBiggles



Joined: 12 May 2005
Posts: 355
Location: Richmond, CA

PostPosted: Fri Sep 05, 2008 8:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dilbert wrote:
have you thought about using a thermostat proper? I used one with a remote sensing bulb - bulb inside cabinet, control dial outside cabinet, hair dryer provided the heat (seed starting cabinet)

you need to watch for how much amperage the contacts will handle and avoid the need for a relay if possible.

this is a fairly heavy duty model (24 amps)
http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/wwg/itemDetailsRender.shtml?ItemId=1611760764


YES, YES, thank you. I shouldn't be pulling more than 10 to 12, if even remotely close. Most likely only a few because the 1600 watts consumed is at HIGH. I had 1 burner set on low and that was too much. I can see pastrami in my future.

Biggles
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