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Quick and easy meatloaf

 
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Jimithing
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 18, 2008 7:27 pm    Post subject: Quick and easy meatloaf Reply with quote

Yield: 4-6 servings

Ingredients

1-2 pound of lean hamburger
1 Cup Heinz ketchup
2 Tablespoon French’s Yellow Mustard
4 Tablespoons A-1 sauce
2 Eggs
2 Cups Keebler Breadcrumbs
Salt to taste
Eggbeater

Preparation

Combine all the ingredients into a 6-cup (1.42L) FoldTuk, making sure that all the ingredients have combined evenly. Once combined, pack together in “loaf” form.
Packed together, use your finger and fill with ketchup and make football-lacing design on uncooked loaf.
Bake on 325° - 350° for about 40-45 minutes or until middle portion is done.
During cooking, take loaf out to drain excess grease if needed.
To serve, collapse sides of FoldTuk (making sure not to spill any liquids) and cut with a Ecko’s plastic spatula.
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kgb1001001



Joined: 21 Dec 2005
Posts: 107

PostPosted: Sat Aug 23, 2008 6:57 pm    Post subject: This recipe brought to you by... Reply with quote

Boy, could the product placement get any more blatant?
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 972
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Sat Aug 23, 2008 7:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kgb1001001 wrote:
Boy, could the product placement get any more blatant?


not really. this exact same "recipe posting" aka "ad" is in more cooking fori than just here . . . .

the F-tuk rep is a regular visitor, wouldn't precisely call it a Guest, but the software does.
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kgb1001001



Joined: 21 Dec 2005
Posts: 107

PostPosted: Sun Aug 24, 2008 11:33 am    Post subject: I guess... Reply with quote

To be honest, I almost could have let this one slide, if it hadn't been for the requirement at the end to cut it with a specific brand of plastic spatula...
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1606
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Sun Aug 24, 2008 6:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Are all of these brands associated to each other (owned by same parent company? or have deals with each other?)?
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 972
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Sun Aug 24, 2008 7:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

not even close.

Heinz is publicly traded
Keebler is Kelloggs
A1 is Kraft Foods
French's is Reckitt Benckiser, Inc.

and Foldtuk is E&M Engineering, Inc. in VA

.....search engines are a wonderful thing - plant a shill and watch 'em go.
being "touted" on subject relevant "blogs" makes products automatically "legit"

FoldTuk has previously spammed with "nuttin but links" and got kilt, so now we're dealing with _real recipes_ -

heh, follows the rules, no?
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IndyRob



Joined: 17 Dec 2006
Posts: 77

PostPosted: Sun Aug 24, 2008 9:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Interesting. I noted the otherwise unreferenced (and unmeasured) 'Eggbeater' ingredient in a recipe featuring 2 eggs. So my thought was "Perhaps we should ask the Eggbeater people exactly how their product would provide a positive contribution to this recipe." I didn't know who makes Eggbeaters so, of course, I Googled it. After a few pages of results I still don't know.

Interestingly, I have just started using Google Adwords to try to promote my products. It does an exceptional job of spewing my adds all over the web - not only through Google searches, but mostly through syndication links (whenever you see the phrase 'Sponsored Links', it's probably Google). So now Google has spidered pages containing links to it's own ads with my product name. Searching for my product on Google now brings up a bunch of unrelated dynamically generated pages that don't even include my ad.

Hrrmmph.

Anyway, there is one interesting phrase here that I see all the time in recipes - salt to taste. In a cooked product, I don't have a problem with 'salting to taste' or 'correcting the seasoning'. But how is one supposed to salt to taste a mound of uncooked hamburger in a new (to me) recipe?
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 972
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Sun Aug 24, 2008 11:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

oops

eggbeaters = ConAgra
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1606
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Mon Aug 25, 2008 5:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

And I always thought that French's and Heinz had to be related somehow. Smile

Yeah, salt to taste is tough on raw food products (especially since salting the mix is VERY different than salting afterward). I generally like to include some guidance on the salting if it's prior to a cooking stage.

Haha, if you trust your ground beef, you can taste it I guess... but, even then, the cooked meat needs a different amount of salt than the uncooked for it to taste good.
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DrBiggles



Joined: 12 May 2005
Posts: 352
Location: Richmond, CA

PostPosted: Mon Aug 25, 2008 7:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

IndyRob wrote:
Anyway, there is one interesting phrase here that I see all the time in recipes - salt to taste. In a cooked product, I don't have a problem with 'salting to taste' or 'correcting the seasoning'. But how is one supposed to salt to taste a mound of uncooked hamburger in a new (to me) recipe?


Mebbe it's meant more along the lines of your preference. Such as, I like blue. So, many of clothes have blue in them, my taste is towards blue. At least, at that point the statement makes more sense.

Biggles
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IndyRob



Joined: 17 Dec 2006
Posts: 77

PostPosted: Mon Aug 25, 2008 9:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Okay, I guess I'll just salt it until it's blue. Wink
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DrBiggles



Joined: 12 May 2005
Posts: 352
Location: Richmond, CA

PostPosted: Tue Aug 26, 2008 4:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

IndyRob wrote:
Okay, I guess I'll just salt it until it's blue. Wink


Which reminds me of getting small children to eat their dinner. I used to make the mashed taters/rice red or blue or green. Man, they loved that.

Salt me until I'm blue. Sounds like an old CW song.

Biggles
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Joy-UK
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 16, 2008 1:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm from the UK & meatloaf hasn't entered the conscienceness of the Brits yet. And looking at the ingredients above, that's not so surprising, as most of them aren't available here.

For any half-way serious cook - adding salt to taste should pose no problem at all. Make up your mix using your experience (as engineers) to judge approximately how much salt you need for the given amount of meat, make a little patty, fry it & taste - make adjustments if neccessary. Job done.

Give me a couple of days & I'll find the superb recipe for meatloaf that I printed off from the NY Times Dining & Wine section by Nigella Lawson, it's a keeper.
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