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Recipe File: Creamy Garlic Mashed Potatoes
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kskerr



Joined: 24 Sep 2005
Posts: 13
Location: Iowa/Chicago

PostPosted: Sun Dec 04, 2005 5:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

As long as you boil the garlic/oil stuff it should be fine. If it is contaminated and growing then I would not want to ingest it uncooked at any time, I hear that 1mg of botulinum toxin can kill 1,000,000 guinea pigs (think it was guinea pigs, if not then probably hampsters, and I have no idea who decided to test this). Point being that the lethal dose of the toxin is very low, which is one reason I cannot understand why someone would pay to have it injected into their skin for cosmetic reasons. I had one person tell me that botox is not a toxin, we argued and she never did come around, can't remember her major, I just hope she is not premed... Course if she takes micro then she'll get straightened out, everyone should take micro, not just a sanitation/food safety course since those tend to breed fear and paranoia (no offense, I've experienced it myself before taking a real micro course). When will people learn that nonpathogenic microbes are our friends and that overuse and misuse of antibiotics and antimicrobial products is going to lead to (and in some cases has already led to) uncurable disesases...

Karen
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 01, 2006 4:32 pm    Post subject: Cold Water V. Boiling Water Reply with quote

In reference to cooking by boiling my grandma always said that if it comes from the "cold" earth, like potatoes, you start it in cold water. If it comes from the "hot" air, above ground, you start it in boiling water. Also, I find that boiling the potatoes whole results in a better product than peeling the potato first. It seems to preserve the structure of the starch plus it is easier to peel the potato after boiling if you don't like the skins.
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kskerr



Joined: 24 Sep 2005
Posts: 13
Location: Iowa/Chicago

PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2006 5:59 am    Post subject: More on the Botulism Reply with quote

So now I am in food microbiology and botulism is a popular topic, especially since there has been a recent outbreak associated with carrot juice of all things. Turns out that several outbreaks have been associated with the garlic in oil mix. My professor said the main problem is that the mixture is often set out on the counter/table for its storage, the oil excludes oxygen and so the botulism spores germinate and grow. If this mixture was cooled and kept in the fridge then this would not be a problem because only one kind of botulism grows at refridgeration temperatures and it is pretty much only associated with seafood (which is why it is a bad idea and illegal for stores to have fresh seafood vacuum packed unless it is frozen). So boil it to get rid of the growing cells and the toxin and keep it cold and this stuff should be rather safe and likely keep for a long time Smile
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wish i was an engineer
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 07, 2006 8:37 pm    Post subject: COLD WATER AND OTHER STUFF Reply with quote

Cool
The reason one should always!!!.. start their potatoes in cold water... Is for the simple reason of evenly cooked potatoes. If you plce the potatoes in cold water , then turn up the heat, the whole mass of the potato will heat up evenly and cook evenly. But if you would put your potatoes into boiling water the outside of the potatoes will cook faster then the cold interior of the potatos, resulting in undercooked insides and mushy overcooked outsides usually resulting in mirky startchy water. A loss in nutrients and potato.

i like to season potatos after to make sure not to much salt is in the boiling water. but could add herbs, bay leaf, whatever.
I usually don't cover the pot either, just have enough water to cover the potatoes, find it nice to drain the potatoes and let steam excess moisture ( the moisture is just water and you want to replace it with good stuff like cream, garlic, butter, etc.)

i was told it is better to mix in your cream and seasoning first till just combined.. then finish with the butter after.. as the potatoes will absorb lots of the cream... and the butter isn;t lost.. it is accented better i the dish if added at the end.
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Smith
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 14, 2007 11:34 pm    Post subject: Garlic in oil Reply with quote

Under no circumstances should you try to preserve garlic in olive oil. Clostridium botulinum is one bacteria that just doesn't give a darn how much you think you know about cooking and food safety.

It grows in soil, so garlic is especially problematic.

The worst part is the way it kills you. The toxin paralyzes your muscles and you slowly suffocate.
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leah
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 15, 2007 11:48 pm    Post subject: NYTimes Reply with quote

Hey Mike --- I was reading up on mashed potatoes in the NYT and saw that you were interviewed. Way to go!!! I do have a theory on why mashed potatoes become tacky when over-worked. Could it be the protein in them potatoes? Sort of like gluten in flour during kneading. Ground meats do this, too... which explains the firm textures of hotdogs and such.
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 08, 2008 2:39 pm    Post subject: Quick tips Reply with quote

Russets are tough to work with in texture. I prefer to use red potatoes--just a little TLC with a hand mixer produces creamy without the gumminess. Leaving in their skins adds a little texture, which I love. They're probably more trouble than it's worth to actually peel since the skins are thin and the potatoes tend to be small.

I haven't tried pre-roasting the garlic (sounds delicious though!), but boil peeled, crushed (slightly) clove with my potatoes and a little bit of chicken broth and use a little of that liquid along with sour cream and plenty of butter to mash with them.

Amazing, isn't it, how many different tricks and variations there are for an old standard like mashed potatoes?

Thanks for your fantastic site!
~Lyss
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 09, 2008 1:45 pm    Post subject: Stand Mixer for fluffier mashed potatoes Reply with quote

Try a Cuisinart Mixer for fluffier mashed potatoes. I personally love mashed potatoes that are all airy creamy and fluffy. Mmmmm
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PostPosted: Tue Dec 16, 2008 3:38 pm    Post subject: Tips for increasing the recipe? Reply with quote

I'm interested in using this recipe at an upcoming pot luck, and want to feed 20-24 people.

Do I just triple all of the ingredients?

Do the cooking times need to be extended?

Much obliged,

ChrisLindbergh
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1025
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Tue Dec 16, 2008 5:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

>>triple the recipe

Chris -

essentially yes - I would advise:

do not add all your liquids in one batch - the amount of moisture remaining on the (cooked) potatoes prior to mashing affects how much liquid/cream you need for the right consistency.

cooking time: going by the only the clock is not recommended. be sure the chunks of potato are reasonably the same size (even cooking) and go for "fork tender" - use something like a caving fork or an i ce pick, not a dinner fork - stick a potato chunk, lift it vertically out of the water, if it falls back into the pot, potatoes are ready. check several "spots" around the pot...

with that volume, I'd be temped to drain the pot, spread the chunks out on a big sheet to allow the excess moisture to evaporate.

and don't forget to taste as you're going along - the "strength" of your garlic and salt amounts in particular.
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SteveP



Joined: 15 Jan 2009
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Thu Jan 15, 2009 1:02 am    Post subject: Another taste Reply with quote

As well as using sour cream instead of heavy cream as has already been suggested, I add grated Parmesan as well. gives a very good flavor. Sorry I don't have any measurements, I go by feel and taste.
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SteveP



Joined: 15 Jan 2009
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Thu Jan 15, 2009 1:29 am    Post subject: Re: Tips for increasing the recipe? Reply with quote

Chris,

Sorry, just found this site so I assume your potluck is over already, but for future reference I will post this. We have done this kind of recipe for very large groups, I use a thin bladed pointed knife to test how done the potatoes are. When they are done we drain them in a large colander and mash them by hand in the pots we cooked them in, this makes potatoes with more lumps and texture. They could be whipped in a mixer or put through a ricer if you want creamer potatoes. We place them in warming trays and store them in a Cambro or warmer to keep them hot until served.

For the kind of thing you are talking about, a 12 quart pot would work well. Wrap some beach towels around the pot to keep it hot.
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 15, 2011 4:59 pm    Post subject: Gummy Mashed Potatoes Reply with quote

I've been cooking for 50+ years. I've used hand-mashers, ricers, and mixers. You can make excellent mashed potatoes with any of these tools. The problem arises when you overcook the potatoes, which happens easily when you cut the raw potatoes into "too small" chunks, then overcook them. Only add enough water to cover. NO more. I like to add salt to the pot before cooking (less salt is necessary this way). Excessive water in the potatoes from too much cooking adds to the mess. It's very important to drain the potatoes when cooked, then place pot back on stove for a few seconds to dry bottom of pot. (I always mash the in the cooking pot to retain heat.) Now, mash until all potatoes are smashed, more if you like really smooth potatoes. Then, slowly begin adding warm milk or cream and butter while mixing. It's not difficult, really. Season to taste.
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Raffi
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 07, 2014 4:17 pm    Post subject: Awesome and cheesy Reply with quote

Mashed potatoes will always be in demand because it is easy to make and it takes less time to get ready. It is a protein-rich food and I simply love it. Mashing could be tricky for a guys like me. I use Breville The Sous Chef for the mashing stage.
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1025
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Mon Apr 07, 2014 5:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

well, don't use that one. you need 220v models for Asia.

that aside, a food processor is likely to turn them into glue before you can switch it off.

potato is about 2% protein; legumes roughly ten times that.
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