Cooking For Engineers Forum Index Cooking For Engineers
Analytical cooking discussed.
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

NuWave Oven Pro

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Cooking For Engineers Forum Index -> Tools, Equipment, and Gadgets
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
CookNewb
Guest





PostPosted: Thu May 01, 2008 9:54 am    Post subject: NuWave Oven Pro Reply with quote

Hello all! I just saw the infomercial for the NuWave Oven Pro. It uses infrared rays to cook. Does anyone own one? Does it perform like shown on TV? How does it compare to a microwave?
Back to top
kgb1001001



Joined: 21 Dec 2005
Posts: 107

PostPosted: Thu May 01, 2008 11:33 am    Post subject: Infrared waves? Reply with quote

That would be ummmm..... heat?

From an online definition of "Infrared waves"

"Denoting electromagnetic radiation of wavelength greater than that of the red end of the spectrum, having wavelengths of 0.751000 μm. Infrared rays are sometimes subdivided into long-wave or far infrared (about 3.01000 μm) and short-wave or near infrared (about 0.753.0 μm). They are capable of penetrating body tissues to a depth of 10 mm. Sources of infrared rays include heat lamps, hot water bottles, steam radiators and incandescent light bulbs.

Infrared rays are used therapeutically to promote muscle relaxation, to speed up the inflammatory process, and to increase circulation to a part of the body. See also heat."

So my question is, how would this be any different from a normal oven (not a microwave, but an oven with a coil or burner)? Seems to me that someone is trying out a marketing ploy.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1626
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Fri May 02, 2008 7:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well, I don't know if about the NuWave in particular, but I do know of ovens that cook with heat lamps (infrared lamps) instead of the standard heating elements of an oven.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
GaryProtein



Joined: 26 Oct 2005
Posts: 535

PostPosted: Sat May 03, 2008 1:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The NuWave that uses "infrared" to cook the food uses an ordinary calrod as its infrared source. It is nothing more than a dressed up glass enclosed toaster oven.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
CookNewb
Guest





PostPosted: Tue May 06, 2008 9:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think an over uses conduction, as in the heating coil heats up the air and the air heats (cooks) the food.

GaryProtein, what is a calrod?
Back to top
GaryProtein



Joined: 26 Oct 2005
Posts: 535

PostPosted: Tue May 06, 2008 10:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

CookNewb wrote:
I think an over uses conduction, as in the heating coil heats up the air and the air heats (cooks) the food.

GaryProtein, what is a calrod?


The calrod is the heating coil. An oven uses conduction, convection and radiation (IR), in varying amounts, to cook food.

I would guess that was GE, Hotpoint or somebody's trade name for "calorie rod" or something like that from when I was a kid, and electric stoves and ovens were just coming into use. I did a quick search, and that term is apparently still in use.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Guest






PostPosted: Wed Jun 11, 2008 12:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I just got a nuwave oven, it is incredibly fast and powerful. I put two rock solid frozen 1 inch thick pork chops into it and in about 15 minutes they were fully cooked (I turned them over halfway through). Frozen chicken pieces were done in about the same time. I believe the combination of infrared heating and convection air currents are responsible for the fast times.
Back to top
Guest






PostPosted: Sat Jul 26, 2008 10:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I heard that because the lid fits on very tight, it traps in moisture so it cannot toast bread. Is this true?
Back to top
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Cooking For Engineers Forum Index -> Tools, Equipment, and Gadgets All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You can post new topics in this forum
You can reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group