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Kitchen Notes: Baker's Yeast
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George Chow



Joined: 13 Jan 2007
Posts: 13
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Sun May 13, 2007 10:16 pm    Post subject: no knead bread Reply with quote

Hi Christine,
Yes, the recipe is definitely a good one. I already did my 3rd no knead bread and this time I baked it as a ciabatta (double e extra wide slippers)on a pizza stone. i have done conventional ciabattas with kneading, but the amount of knead determines the final product and here you have less variables to deal with.
for naples style pizzas, I will need to change the hydration percentage to around 65 percent, but i don't think this is going to pose a problem. another thing that i might need to change is the yeast percentage (to a lower number) since the room temp fermentation time is so long.
i actually built my own outdoor infrared burner (66,000 btu) pizza oven using refractory bricks with two computer fans under the burners to cool them. the only drawback is that the heat is from the bottom and not from the side and top as in a brick oven. to get around it, i need to heat up the top of the oven first without the pizza stone to get the top hot enough and then heat up the pizza stone. i can get the oven temperature to stabilize around 800 in around 45 minutes and do a 2 min pizza. one of my favorite is a white pizza with re hydrated mission fig, prosciutto and buffalo mozarella (using olive oil to replace tomato sauce).
take care
george
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Reg from South Africa
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 09, 2007 8:40 am    Post subject: No-knead bread Reply with quote

A very good site with some good discussion about the NKB. I initially misjudged the whole situation and equated no-knead bread with batter bread. It is nothing of the sort and I eat every word I ever said about NKB in the past and I am now stating that the Lahey technique is indeed a very clever technique that deserves the highest praise. My problems actually centered around those ridiculous American volume measures!!

I have developed an Excel spreadsheet, in full working order, stating the actual formula as well as the baker's percentages and the wastage factor that one must consider.

Send me your e-mail address and I will send you a file. It is free as long as you promise to give me your comments on the spreadsheet.

I wil send it as a file, which you then just download.

Regards Reg - (treegro@telkomsa.net)
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Guest






PostPosted: Sun Jan 20, 2008 12:22 am    Post subject: Jeffrey Steingarten "Easy Riser" recipe in Vogue m Reply with quote

Jeffrey Steingarten did an article about the No Knead Bread in Vogue magazine. I highly recommend trying to find that recipe if you can. I have been making the Steingarten no knead for about six months and Prior to Steingarten I was unable to make bread at all due to wrist injuries, but now? I've made hundreds of perfect loaves of bread for friends and family. I'm a believer.
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Make Bread, Not War
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 24, 2008 12:34 am    Post subject: Yeast is so awesome! Reply with quote

Dude, yeast is so cool! I haven't tried all of them, but I think that, from your reasoning, it would work!!! I have only tried the instant yeast. Sad
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catt2858
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 06, 2008 3:00 am    Post subject: help Reply with quote

my friend and i made zeppole and she mix the flour and yeast together with out disolving the yeast will i get sick she put warm water in the mix.
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1618
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Sun Jul 06, 2008 6:13 am    Post subject: Re: help Reply with quote

catt2858 wrote:
my friend and i made zeppole and she mix the flour and yeast together with out disolving the yeast will i get sick she put warm water in the mix.

Why would you get sick? Was the resulting batter/dough not baked?
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newhand
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 10, 2008 6:22 pm    Post subject: Dead dough? Reply with quote

Can someone help explain?

I used to be able to make dough with yeast dissolved in warm water first and get good results, but yesterday when I used the same process except that I added 3 tablespoonfuls of flaxseed power mixed in the power and let the well-mixed dough sit for hours in the warm room temperature. At the end of the day, the dough refused to rise. It remained dead dough. I hated to throw the dough away and therefore had to make pancakes out of it. It turned out to be good, but I didn't understand why it didn't rise at all.

What went wrong? The flaxseed or dead yeast?
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 999
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Thu Jul 10, 2008 6:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've never heard anything about flax products doing in a bread dough - it's pretty commonly used.

yeast can die / go bad - actually that's one of the benefits of blooming the yeast in warm water - if it bubbles&foams up, you know it is still alive and kicking. no foam, not good to use . . . did you perchance notice?

other oddities - water mix too hot - too hot will kill the yeast.

salt - salt can inhibit yeast - generally not added to the water/yeast directly.
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cejay
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PostPosted: Sun Aug 03, 2008 11:05 pm    Post subject: yeast in gluten-free bread Reply with quote

I have celiac disease and bake all my own bread using a variety of flours (rice, bean, sorgum, etc). I had been using Fleischman's Active dry(from a jar), and make all bread in a machine. Recently, I picked up a jar of Red Star dry active yeast instead & began having problems with the bread "falling" in the middle (Gluten free bread never has a nice rounded top but it isn't supposed to sink in the middle, either). A loaf made with my remaining Fleishman's didn't do that. Comparing the labels I see Red Star contains Sorbian Monostearate. Fleishman's doesn't. Since everything else is equal (same machine, brands of flour, etc), could that additive be affecting the rise or strength of the yeast? But I'm really curious about that additive, since my impression is it "speeds up" the yeast so maybe it's exhausting itself too soon? Cejay
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CarolineW
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 31, 2008 12:17 pm    Post subject: Fresh yeast ? Reply with quote

Help, I have been living in US for four days and have an old recipe from back home in UK. Where can I obtain fresh yeast as the recipe for a fruit loaf for Diabetics says you must use fresh yeast. Any ideas where it is available. Unsure
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 999
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Fri Oct 31, 2008 9:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

many grocery stores will have it - it's typically in the dairy refrigerated section but frequently there's more than one refrigerated case so you may find it quickest to ask.
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Linh
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 18, 2009 3:38 am    Post subject: Can I use instant dry yeast on a homemade fruit wine insted Reply with quote

Can I use instant dry yeast on a homemade fruit wine instead of active yeast?
I'm making one for my Biochemistry project.
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mattredmond



Joined: 30 Jan 2009
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Fri Jan 30, 2009 6:45 pm    Post subject: Yeast versus Mold Reply with quote

Hi,

Not to nitpick, but as this is Cooking for Engineers, a degree of precision seems necessary.

You said:

Quote:
...are many other species of yeast that are found everywhere including the ones that grow as mold (yeasts are actually a type of mold) on food left out too long...


This is incorrect. Yeasts are fungi. Molds are also fungi. But yeasts are not molds and vice-versa.

Molds grow in multi-cell filament-like structures called hyphae. That is what makes most of them look furry or fuzzy. Yeasts, on the other hand, grow as single cells sort of like bacteria do.
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1618
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Fri Jan 30, 2009 7:52 pm    Post subject: Re: Yeast versus Mold Reply with quote

mattredmond wrote:

Quote:
...are many other species of yeast that are found everywhere including the ones that grow as mold (yeasts are actually a type of mold) on food left out too long...


This is incorrect. Yeasts are fungi. Molds are also fungi. But yeasts are not molds and vice-versa.

Molds grow in multi-cell filament-like structures called hyphae. That is what makes most of them look furry or fuzzy. Yeasts, on the other hand, grow as single cells sort of like bacteria do.

You are completely correct! I have no idea what I was thinking when I wrote that sentence... just reading it again was enough for me to go "what? why did I say that?" I've removed the incorrect line from the article. Thanks for letting me know and reducing the errors on CFE!
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melissa
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 21, 2009 4:33 pm    Post subject: pizza Reply with quote

I was wondering if there is a certain kind of yeast to use when you make pizza that doesn't rise after the pizza dough is in the fridge in the pizza pan.
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