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broasted chicken
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saridaho
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PostPosted: Fri May 09, 2008 4:27 am    Post subject: broasted chicken Reply with quote

Hey Engineers - maybe you can help me out - I acquired a pressure cooker for the express purpose of broasting chicken. I then discovered in my warning section that I must never pressure cook any type of fry/oil stuff. I have a farberware fpc 400. On ocook on the web they seemed to say it was ok to do with caution. Anyhow, I don't want a fire or explosion - I just want to know if anyone has cooked chicken in a pressure cooker and what kind of precautions need to be taken. Thanks.
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ERdept



Joined: 24 Apr 2008
Posts: 39
Location: LA

PostPosted: Fri May 09, 2008 9:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

In cooking in general, you must add flavor to foods. There are several ways to do so, but it is best to do so with different types of techniques.

For instance, you can use a rub, then fry, then sauce. Thus there are three different types of ways to add flavor.

If I use a pressure cooker, first I coat all parts in seasoning (this may be as simple as salt and pepper, but may include herbs) Don't salt too early, as salt draws out moisture from meat. But herbs ealy infuse flavor.

So, I'd herb the chiken, then right before cooking, I'd salt and pepper, then fry in olive oil.

Once I do that, you have one method of flavoring done. You've coated it in seasoning, and browned it in the pressure cooker.

Now the bits in the cooker, may be deglazed with wine or stock. The bits at the bottom have a lot of flavor. Once you add wine or stock or a combo of both, then simmer for a little while till the bits come off, add more seasoning, the add chicken back in. This is a second method to add flavor on top of the rub.

Now pressure cook till desired doneness. Serve with sides of carbs (rice, potaotes) and veggie. I'd do mashed taters, and sauteed spinich with shitake shrooms.

You may now make a easy sauce, such as a lemon caper. Start by mincing shallot (milder in flavor than onions), and sweating in oil/butter, add lemon juice, capers and stock, then reduce. There you have your sauce, and thus a third method to add flavor to your previous two.

To answer your question, oil can be used in a pressure cooker, just don't go past fill line with any liquid. Also, oil rubber gasket so it's easier to remove. Make sure your escape valve is free and clear and your rocker hole is clear of food debris. Cook away!


If you do not fry first, the chicken will be done, but an unappetizing white or grey color. Presentation is also a factor of cooking.

I love the pressure cooker. It was the primitive microwave and cooked things faster than any other means during its hey day.
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DrBiggles



Joined: 12 May 2005
Posts: 355
Location: Richmond, CA

PostPosted: Fri May 09, 2008 7:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

ERdept wrote:


If I use a pressure cooker, first I coat all parts in seasoning (this may be as simple as salt and pepper, but may include herbs) Don't salt too early, as salt draws out moisture from meat. But herbs ealy infuse flavor.


Whatchu talkin' 'bout Willis !?! I been marinating chicken in salt (for up to 3 days) with absolute stellar results for years. Here:

http://www.cyberbilly.com/meathenge/archives/000516.html

Was given the idea from a friend who used to work at the Zuni Cafe, google zuni roast chicken. While my method and Judy's are quite different, chicken is left in the fridge for 1 to 2 days with salt.

You're missing out!

Biggles
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SirShazar



Joined: 30 Jul 2007
Posts: 89

PostPosted: Sat May 10, 2008 4:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think you guys are missing the point, broasting means pressure frying, a dangerous procedure that SHOULD NOT be done at home.
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ERdept



Joined: 24 Apr 2008
Posts: 39
Location: LA

PostPosted: Sat May 10, 2008 9:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

SirShazar wrote:
I think you guys are missing the point, broasting means pressure frying, a dangerous procedure that SHOULD NOT be done at home.


Yes, I misunderstood the question. You are correct about no pressure frying. I thought the question was, is it safe to fry, then pressure cook the oil and bits left in.


As for the salt on food for several days. Your comment belies your knowledge of food principles.

Study enough and you'll know this is a base fact. As basic as the principles behind deglaze, adding room temp oil to a hot pan, and the fact that clarified butter has a higher smoke point,etc, etc, etc.

Never salt too early. Reversing this methodology is to brine meats, such an poultry. The science behind that is that the meat cells have salt in them already and the brine solution, through the membrane of the flash......

Science behind it here.....

http://www.cooksillustrated.com/images/document/howto/ND01_ISBriningbasics.pdf

But salt too early is bad.
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DrBiggles



Joined: 12 May 2005
Posts: 355
Location: Richmond, CA

PostPosted: Sat May 10, 2008 3:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

ERdept wrote:
SirShazar wrote:
I think you guys are missing the point, broasting means pressure frying, a dangerous procedure that SHOULD NOT be done at home.


Yes, I misunderstood the question. You are correct about no pressure frying. I thought the question was, is it safe to fry, then pressure cook the oil and bits left in.


As for the salt on food for several days. Your comment belies your knowledge of food principles.

Study enough and you'll know this is a base fact. As basic as the principles behind deglaze, adding room temp oil to a hot pan, and the fact that clarified butter has a higher smoke point,etc, etc, etc.

Never salt too early. Reversing this methodology is to brine meats, such an poultry. The science behind that is that the meat cells have salt in them already and the brine solution, through the membrane of the flash......

Science behind it here.....

http://www.cooksillustrated.com/images/document/howto/ND01_ISBriningbasics.pdf

But salt too early is bad.


Science gets in the way of good food.

Biggles
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 998
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Sat May 10, 2008 3:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think lack of definition is getting more in the way than anything else.

"Too early" is this a year, a month, a day, an hour??? what is "too"?
does perhaps "too" depend on the intended cooking method / recipe / technique?

putting dead fish in a pot "too early" can be bad for fish chowder.
then again, Asian cultures put dead fish in pots way long too early - in the end they call it fish sauce . . . . is that "too early"?
with much salt, btw.....

"marinating in salt" - marinade brings a liquid to mind.
brining? or "salt rub"?

applying salt brings moisture and proteins to the surface of a meat - fosters good color.... is that "too earlier"?

" Whatchu talkin' 'bout Willis !?! " - my thoughts exactly.... <g>
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DrBiggles



Joined: 12 May 2005
Posts: 355
Location: Richmond, CA

PostPosted: Sat May 10, 2008 4:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dilbert wrote:
I think lack of definition is getting more in the way than anything else.

"Too early" is this a year, a month, a day, an hour??? what is "too"?
does perhaps "too" depend on the intended cooking method / recipe / technique?

putting dead fish in a pot "too early" can be bad for fish chowder.
then again, Asian cultures put dead fish in pots way long too early - in the end they call it fish sauce . . . . is that "too early"?
with much salt, btw.....

"marinating in salt" - marinade brings a liquid to mind.
brining? or "salt rub"?

applying salt brings moisture and proteins to the surface of a meat - fosters good color.... is that "too earlier"?

" Whatchu talkin' 'bout Willis !?! " - my thoughts exactly.... <g>


To Marinate = To drink one's self to the happy state. Marinate.

I don't take absolutes very well. Tell me that I cannot salt too early, I'll salt early and the food will be great. Tell me I cannot drive my VW Bug in to the Aquatic Park, I do it. (2nd time I got out under my own power too). Tell me I can't make pot roast with a chicken? Done that too, just shortened the cooking time. Man, it was the best ever.

I've got Car Wash, 2 LP set and I know how to use it. Stand back pal!

Biggles
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ERdept



Joined: 24 Apr 2008
Posts: 39
Location: LA

PostPosted: Sat May 10, 2008 5:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I speak of classical technique and principles. You do what you want, but I quote general rules, not a specific recipe.


To argue further is pointless. Move on. Mow Ron.
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DrBiggles



Joined: 12 May 2005
Posts: 355
Location: Richmond, CA

PostPosted: Sat May 10, 2008 6:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

ERdept wrote:
I speak of classical technique and principles. You do what you want, but I quote general rules, not a specific recipe.


To argue further is pointless. Move on. Mow Ron.


Classical Technique stiffles creativity.
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 998
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Sat May 10, 2008 6:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

ERdept wrote:
I speak of classical technique and principles. You do what you want, but I quote general rules, not a specific recipe.


that's the question. of what do you speak?

Classical?
salt pork, salt cured beef and salt cod don't get any more classical. when is "too soon" to classically apply the salt?

I am not trying to be difficult - obviously you have some experience of "too soon" - I'm trying to decipher what that is.

mumbo-jumbo-cook-until-done type stuff is not especially helpful - if you have some specifics to the "too soon" theory, please share them.
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DrBiggles



Joined: 12 May 2005
Posts: 355
Location: Richmond, CA

PostPosted: Sat May 10, 2008 7:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dilbert wrote:
ERdept wrote:
I speak of classical technique and principles. You do what you want, but I quote general rules, not a specific recipe.


that's the question. of what do you speak?

Classical?


ER stated that you shouldn't salt too soon, meaning, most likely, to salt just as your product enters the pan or roaster. One doesn't want to give the salt time to do what it does best, suck the moisture out. Salt a sliced mater and see what happens. I suppose what she missed was that my weak point was for every rule, there is a way to break it and make it work well.

Biggles
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ERdept



Joined: 24 Apr 2008
Posts: 39
Location: LA

PostPosted: Sun May 11, 2008 12:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you cook and know, then you know what I mean. If you're nitpicking, then you're nitpicking.

If you really know what I'm referrring to generally, then that's good. I feel you're nitpicking.

I'm talking about salting generally and the general principles. Not about specific salting techniques that are specific to those foods that require salting well before hand.

Argumentative. ha ha My main response was not to salt too soon. Which most people know, but some don't. And some that don't want to destroy flavor and don't know any better. No prob. I'm just giving general cooking advice, not a specific recipe.

What is too soon. Well that depends upon what you're cooking. Salt a ribeye a day ahead of time, then you draw out moisture. Salt if before the pan and it's perfect.

You know what i mean. You're just being childish. Again, if you cook, you don't need specifics on time. You have experience enough to know what foods need what treatment.

Once more for the 6th time. I am saying don't salt foods too soon that will go into the pan, generally.

And this advice is sound.
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ERdept



Joined: 24 Apr 2008
Posts: 39
Location: LA

PostPosted: Sun May 11, 2008 12:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

DrBiggles wrote:
ERdept wrote:
I speak of classical technique and principles. You do what you want, but I quote general rules, not a specific recipe.


To argue further is pointless. Move on. Mow Ron.


Classical Technique stiffles creativity.


Classical technique is the basis for creativity. Once you understand the principles, then you can vary from there. That's why at cooking schools, you're taught classical technique so you have a solid foundation.

When you read a recipe and see what deglaze is, then you can deglaze with oriental flavors and ingredients. When you see what to saute means, then you can saute seal meat, but understand that it's not any measureable amount of oil, and if it is, you're frying. Or understand how to balance flavors, then you can apply the same techniques to be creative with food from Germany, Asia, your own grocery store, or stay classical.

It classical is the basis for creativity. It gives you the why's and how's or reasons behind doing things. Those base principles will save a person from making basic mistakes that can make a potentially good dish a merely adequate one.
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1617
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Sun May 11, 2008 5:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

ERdept wrote:
What is too soon. Well that depends upon what you're cooking. Salt a ribeye a day ahead of time, then you draw out moisture. Salt if before the pan and it's perfect.

I didn't want to jump in and pour lighter fluid on an open flame, but I've got to point out that salting a rib eye steak a day before hand and then giving it a quick sear on each side is awesome...
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