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seeking the perfect chef's knife
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SirShazar



Joined: 30 Jul 2007
Posts: 89

PostPosted: Sat Feb 23, 2008 4:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

tiberiu wrote:
I have noticed some really great knives on the tele-shopping channel and I was thinking to ask for your advice. The knives do not have a familiar brand but they seem to do what they were designed to: cut cut cut. The brand is called Shaolin, maybe you have heard of it.


I would avoid any product advertised on tele-shoppping channels. I can guerantee that you'll find a better deal online.
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Howard



Joined: 21 Nov 2005
Posts: 64

PostPosted: Sun Mar 09, 2008 6:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

buzzard767 wrote:
tiberiu wrote:
I have noticed some really great knives on the tele-shopping channel and I was thinking to ask for your advice. The knives do not have a familiar brand but they seem to do what they were designed to: cut cut cut. The brand is called Shaolin, maybe you have heard of it.


I tried a couple search engines and Shaolin knife or knives shows nothing. Sorry I can't help you out.

Probably because they were shown on the TV shopping channel.
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ERdept



Joined: 24 Apr 2008
Posts: 39
Location: LA

PostPosted: Tue Apr 29, 2008 8:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have the Henckles Cermax. Amazing knife. I also have a Takeda, and Kumagoro.

When people say that other brands perform the same, they don't know.


This knife stays sharp for a Loooong time. Any other lesser knives cannot compare, and you'll see that upon ownership.

This line is made in Japan. The Japanes have traditionally been masters of steel and by Henckles having this line made in Japan is telling.

I stopped using European chef's because they literally cannot hold an edge as compared to the Japanes knives.

Buy once, cry once.


Spend your money on a good knife that you will own for the rest of your life and pass on. Use it, care for it and get used to it. It will become part of you and your prep.

You need to eat daily and your knife is your tool to do so, if you cook. Get something that is quality.


I stick with the Japanese makers. Superior steel, such as Aogami Supersteel and Hitachi steels.

Check out Epicurean edge or google Japanese Chefs knife, or Arizona Custom Knife. Jagstyle seems to know what he's talking about too. Good advice.

Some minor issues with Japanes knives is a forward or blade heavy inclination and not as much "rocker" or curve to the blade as western blades.

Solved all that by specifying more rocker in my ordered knife. Blade heavyness necessitates a pinch grip or change in cutting style or technique. No big deal.


Prep becomes a pleasure and "fun" once you have a good tool to do it with. Hardness is not the end all, but that and feel and quality are other factors
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buzzard767



Joined: 30 Jan 2008
Posts: 21

PostPosted: Tue Apr 29, 2008 9:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

ERdept wrote:
When people say that other brands perform the same, they don't know.

I stopped using European chef's because they literally cannot hold an edge as compared to the Japanes knives.


Ya got that right!

ERdept wrote:
I stick with the Japanese makers. Superior steel, such as Aogami Supersteel and Hitachi steels.


Hitachi is the manufacturer of Aogami (AKA blue super). The also make blue #1, blue #2, white 1&2, yellow, ZDP-189 powdered stainless, etc. Blue super is my carbon steel of choice but either of the whites is a close second and considerably cheaper.

ERdept wrote:
Solved all that by specifying more rocker in my ordered knife. Blade heavyness necessitates a pinch grip or change in cutting style or technique. No big deal.


Let me hang it out by bursting a bubble as I state that a "rocking" big bellied blade as a desireable attribute is a myth. You don't need a knife that 'rocks". Watch Curtis Chung using a Chuckabocho. Shown are several cutting and chopping techniques including "rocking" where the tip never leaves the cutting surface. The blades on both of these Chuckas are dead flat. http://youtube.com/watch?v=x9GzpSei6u0

ERdept wrote:
Prep becomes a pleasure and "fun" once you have a good tool to do it with.


Good tool by Shinichi Watanabe -

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ERdept



Joined: 24 Apr 2008
Posts: 39
Location: LA

PostPosted: Wed Apr 30, 2008 7:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Beautiful!
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ERdept



Joined: 24 Apr 2008
Posts: 39
Location: LA

PostPosted: Wed Apr 30, 2008 10:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

[quote="buzzard767"]
ERdept wrote:
When people say that other brands perform the same, they don't know.

I stopped using European chef's because they literally cannot hold an edge as compared to the Japanes knives.


Ya got that right!

ERdept wrote:
I stick with the Japanese makers. Superior steel, such as Aogami Supersteel and Hitachi steels.


Hitachi is the manufacturer of Aogami (AKA blue super). The also make blue #1, blue #2, white 1&2, yellow, ZDP-189 powdered stainless, etc. Blue super is my carbon steel of choice but either of the whites is a close second and considerably cheaper.

ERdept wrote:
Solved all that by specifying more rocker in my ordered knife. Blade heavyness necessitates a pinch grip or change in cutting style or technique. No big deal.


Let me hang it out by bursting a bubble as I state that a "rocking" big bellied blade as a desireable attribute is a myth. You don't need a knife that 'rocks". Watch Curtis Chung using a Chuckabocho. Shown are several cutting and chopping techniques including "rocking" where the tip never leaves the cutting surface. The blades on both of these Chuckas are dead flat. http://youtube.com/watch?v=x9GzpSei6u0

ERdept wrote:
Prep becomes a pleasure and "fun" once you have a good tool to do it with.


Good tool by Shinichi Watanabe -

I watched the vids. Thanks. One of the Chukabochos is flat and one has rocker. Look at the vid and you'll see in the side by side frame that the right one is absolutely flat and the one on the left has some curvature to the blade.

Good vid.
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buzzard767



Joined: 30 Jan 2008
Posts: 21

PostPosted: Wed Apr 30, 2008 11:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The blade with a little bit of belly is a Mizuno. The dead flat edge is a Moritaka. I have a nearly identical Moritaka, also dead flat. He "rocked" with both of them, and I rock mine as well. The flat edge is also great for chopping up large amounts of parsley and the like in a hurry, no rocking required. Wink

Buzz
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ERdept



Joined: 24 Apr 2008
Posts: 39
Location: LA

PostPosted: Thu May 01, 2008 12:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

As the song from David Exxes goes..........

Hey kid, rock and roll
Rock on, ooh, my soul
Hey kid, boogey too, did ya

Hey shout, summertime blues
Jump up and down in my blue suede shoes
Hey kid, rock and roll, rock on

And where do we go from here
Which is the way that's clear

Still looking for that blue jean, baby queen
Prettiest girl I ever seen
See her shake on the movie screen, Jimmy Dean
(James Dean)

And where do we go from here
Which is the way that's clear

Still looking for that blue jean, baby queen
Prettiest girl I ever seen
See her shake on the movie screen, Jimmy Dean
Jimmy Dean
Rock on
Rock on
Rock on



I just got a Takeda Chukabochu to add to my old Chinese cleaver.
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buzzard767



Joined: 30 Jan 2008
Posts: 21

PostPosted: Thu May 01, 2008 12:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

ERdept wrote:
I just got a Takeda Chukabochu to add to my old Chinese cleaver.


Thin is it not? All Takeda knives rock!

We need pictures......
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ERdept



Joined: 24 Apr 2008
Posts: 39
Location: LA

PostPosted: Thu May 01, 2008 8:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Buzz.......

It's thin, but all his knives are very easy to sharpen..


I just about cleaned out Arizona Custom Knife's Takeda stuff after I discovered the source, instead of having to order from him directly.

Which is a pleasure to anyway.

But this way I get them in a chunk. After I got his first one to add to my Kumagoro, I just focused on his stuff.

Love the unfinished nature of the blade a it says he was there and it a left his hands from hand crafting.

Yes, they are thin, but not overly. I dont have a digital camera. I will buy one in two weeks when I get paid and post some pics.

PEACE.
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buzzard767



Joined: 30 Jan 2008
Posts: 21

PostPosted: Thu May 01, 2008 3:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have a Takeda 240 Gyuto which is neck in neck with a Yoshikane 240 SKD for my all time favorite knife. I'd love to get one of his Nakiris but I'd have trouble looking my wife in the eye because I already have a Moritaka 165 which is super thin and a Murry Carter 6 sun on order which should be here in less than a month. I think I'm about knifed out.

I had planned to drive up to Atlanta for the knife show on May 30th. Both Takeda and Watanabe will have tables there. Something came up and my wife and I have to be in Minneapolis that weekend. Takeda will also be at the knife show in Chicago in mid-September. I might be able to make that one. Hope so.
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ERdept



Joined: 24 Apr 2008
Posts: 39
Location: LA

PostPosted: Sat May 03, 2008 8:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oh, by the way, while we're speaking of Japanese knives, and knives in general, I'd like to recommend a place that keeps your tool of the trade and your hobby perfroming at their best.

This is a Japanese knife sharpening service that does it with many grades of Japanese waterstones, BY HAND!

http://www.japaneseknifesharpening.com/index.html

If you ever sharpened knives, you know how difficult it is to maintain a consistent angle. You'd appreciate this service.

You knives come back BETTER looking than they went in. High polish on the back bevel or secondary bevel. Razor sharp primary bevel or cutting bevel.
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buzzard767



Joined: 30 Jan 2008
Posts: 21

PostPosted: Sun May 04, 2008 12:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

So you know about Dave Martell, eh. You should have mentioned his rehandling service as well.... The picture is the earlier mentioned Yoshikane that he rehandled, definitely not stock.

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ERdept



Joined: 24 Apr 2008
Posts: 39
Location: LA

PostPosted: Wed May 07, 2008 5:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Based on your pic, I sent both my Kumagoro and Takeda Gyuto's out for rehandling.

He sent me a link of available handles and I got a stabilized maple and a Koa.

Look forward to getting them and hope they look as good as yours.
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buzzard767



Joined: 30 Jan 2008
Posts: 21

PostPosted: Wed May 07, 2008 12:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The handles are actually made by apicius9 on another forum. He's a college professor in Hawaii and does it for a hobby. Dave does the actual installation and does a terrific job. The handles usually look better in hand than on the pictures.

I hope you're having Dave sharpen your knives while he has them. He's the best free hander I've ever seen His edges are positively amazing.

Buzz
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