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Test Recipes: Pan Pizza
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W8ing4daybreak
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 09, 2008 12:46 am    Post subject: dough answers Reply with quote

For the person who asked, Yes, you can use half whole wheat flour. If you shop around you can even find whole wheat bread flour. It won't taste the same, but you can't really expect it to. I add a little flax seed to my dough too.

You can freeze pizza dough. I make individual rounds of dough and stack them in a round container, separated by oiled disposable plastic plates. I put the whole thing in the freezer, then move it to the fridge the day before I plan to use it. I even take it camping with me. I put it in the cooler. Throw the rounds of dough on the grill a couple at a time, flip them over, top them quickly, and there you have it grilled pizza.
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rich.bronson



Joined: 25 Mar 2008
Posts: 16

PostPosted: Tue Mar 25, 2008 1:37 pm    Post subject: Re: my engineering experience Reply with quote

Mech - PE wrote:
I was not responding to your pizza hut recipe. Frankly any estblishment that fills the crust with cheese is not worth takiing about. Have a happy new year and ..... lighten up.

The Professional Engineer


I agree with your Pizza Hut comment completely. It's big businesses like them that have ruined cooking. I tried their stuffed crust pizza one time and I wasn't impressed at all.
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CanadianNancy
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 12, 2008 12:17 am    Post subject: Yeast Proofing Reply with quote

Hi there! Love the web site! I have a quick question. Nowhere in the recipe do you say if you proof the yeast or not. If you do, how much water do you add to it???

Thanks so much and happy baking!!!
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1631
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Sat Apr 12, 2008 2:20 am    Post subject: Re: Yeast Proofing Reply with quote

CanadianNancy wrote:
Nowhere in the recipe do you say if you proof the yeast or not. If you do, how much water do you add to it???

I used Active Dry yeast which does not need proofing.
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Noahzark
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 20, 2008 1:28 am    Post subject: noahzark@tampabay.rr.com Reply with quote

I use 14 % protien/gluten flour King Arthur Flour Co sells one called
"Lancelot" and is available on line in 3 lb bags. They make numerous flours but you will not see their "Sir Lancelot" in the local market. If there is a Gordon Food Service store in your state (check the yellow pages) they carry 14 % flour. that is where I bought mine, in Florida. I bought a 25 lb bag for $13.99. They had two choices. The one I bought is called "Bouncer". It makes a great crust. For thin crust use 1/4 tsp rapid rise yeast to 2-2 2/3 cups flour. Let proof to double in size in refrigerator. Takes 2-3 days to achieve this doubling but allows time for proper fermentat and flavor development.
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joefish
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 12, 2008 7:33 am    Post subject: Help! Reply with quote

This recipe seems to fail for me when I get to the second part of making the dough (splitting it in two, and putting it back in the oven to rise). It doesn't rise any more!

Since I'm new to bread-making, what could I be doing wrong?
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1018
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Sat Jul 12, 2008 11:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

.....what could I be doing wrong?

probably nothing. if the dough rose okay in the first round, then the yeast is good. after shaping the dough is not going to poof up hugely - you will not "see" a "doubling" of bulk/volume quite the same as when in a ball - it's only a slight increase in thickness....
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Jim_P
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 14, 2008 4:12 am    Post subject: One warning Reply with quote

I've followed this recipe many times with good results. But the last time, the cooking oil we had on hand was Smart Balance Omega.

This recipe will pick up flavor from the oil, and in this case, we wound up with a slightly fishy-tasting crust! Quite a shock. Shock

In any case, stick with the olive oil. Though frankly, I think I prefer non-extra-virgin oil for this recipe. It's good either way. (But no fish!)

-Jim
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Pinky



Joined: 11 Nov 2008
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Tue Nov 11, 2008 5:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

1/ Lose the sugar unless you're the kinda cook who substitutes Campbell's condensed tomato soup for the sauce. It's really only a cheap shot way of browning the pizza without the requisite BTU's.

2/ "Extra Virgin" on the olive oil can means very little. The key words to look for are "First Cold Pressed".

3/ Line the bottom of your oven with firebricks (NOT tiles, but bricks used to line a fireplace or a blast furnace). Nothing like thermal mass to bring an oven to life. It takes a lot longer to get the oven up to temperature, but it is worth the wait. Temperature? 500F.

4/ Bake off the pizza in a cast iron skillet placed directly on the firebrick.

Pinky
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PostPosted: Tue Dec 09, 2008 5:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

my microwave oven has convection and grill option....which one of these three i should choose for baking pizza....
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jazzguy
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 29, 2008 4:17 am    Post subject: Dough in Bread maker Reply with quote

I don't have a mixer as they suggest using to make the dough. Instead, I used my bread maker on the dough setting which is what I always use to make pizza dough. I had guests over, and everyone really liked this pizza! The dough came out great. It's even easier in a bread maker, and you can elimate the step about proofing in the oven.
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guest
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 06, 2009 8:29 pm    Post subject: excess fat Reply with quote

I find that you can remove the excess fat that is left on the top of the pizza by applying the towel directly to it once it's cooked - the only problem is if there is lots of tomato sauce coming though the cheese - in which case it will pick up some of that as well.
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keng
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 15, 2009 7:15 pm    Post subject: Pizza Peel Reply with quote

I have been using your receipe except cooking on a stone. I have been spreading the dough out on an aluminum pizza peel. Directions for using the aluminum pizza peel, suggest using corn meal or semolina to keep the dough from sticking to the peel. This is so after you have preheated the stone you transfer the prepped pizza from the peel to the stone. My problem is the dough keeps sticking to the peel and doesn't want to slide onto the stone. My thinking is that as I strecth the dough it is exposing areas that don't have any corn meal and is sticking to the peel. Any suggestions.

Ken
kgraves@elmore.rr.com
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1018
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Sun Feb 15, 2009 7:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

keng -

try making your dough on a floured+cornmeal surface - not directly on the aluminum peel.

that way you can shuffle the dough around on a surface to ensure it's loose and moves with the cornmeal, then lift an edge and slide the peel under.

the problem with aluminum peels is they just don't "retain" any flour dusting, cornmeal splash, etc. it all "runs off" vs a wood peel or wood working surface . . .
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guest
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 18, 2009 3:47 am    Post subject: pan pizza Reply with quote

Just made this tonight.

I'd say it was better than pizza hut's pan pizza. A few things I did differently: for the milk, i used half milk and half water. Didn't use as much oil in the pan... and i also spread olive oil on the crust then sprinkled it with granulated garlic and permesan cheese, which gave the crust a good flavor.

Thanks for the great recipe!
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