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Recipe File: Shepherd's Pie (Cottage Pie)
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Heather
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 20, 2008 12:00 am    Post subject: Baked Beans Reply with quote

Interesting to see so many comments - I didn't realise this dish wasn't well known in the US. It tends to be a staple in England - it's cheap & quick & children love it.

My family always used a layer of baked beans between meat & potatoes - drain the sauce from the beans and stir it into the meat with a dash of worcester sauce, instead of gravy. All sorts of tinned or left over veg can be used though, as other comments suggest.

One of the great things about the basic idea is that you can vary it in so many ways - curried meat mix or sausage & tomatoes are both good with cheesy mash for example. You can also use a layer of sliced potatoes on top instead of mashing them, if you have waxy potatoes, or use celeriac, swede, sweet potato, kohlrabi or what you will.

Incidentally the fish version, fisherman's pie, is usually made with a layer of sliced hard boiled eggs over the fish & white sauce.
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sgao
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 25, 2008 2:46 am    Post subject: Delicious Reply with quote

I just made this a couple of days ago. I followed the recipe almost exactly. I took the advice of others on the site and added some frozen peas/corn. This dish was delicious. I was eager to eat the leftovers the next day. I can't wait to make this again!
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shaz
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 01, 2008 9:01 am    Post subject: shepherds pie Reply with quote

I would like to suggest you try adding butternut squash to the mashed potato and sprinkle grated cheese on top, and regarding the cottage or shepherds pie debate my grandmother led me to believe that cottage pie was minced beef and potatoes (no pastry), and shepherds pie was minced lamb.
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Joy
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 02, 2008 1:50 am    Post subject: Shepherd's Pie Reply with quote

Mine's still in the over. (Hey, love your site!) My (steamed) potatoes dried out a bit while I was cooking the rest, so rather than spreading them on, I just kind of broke them up with my hands. They are browning very nicely -- looks pretty. Also, my meat mixture ended up a little wet, so I thought it better not to moisten the potatoes. Also, I mixed a little cayenne with my paprika. Five to ten minutes to go. I'm hungry! Thanks, engineers! I ate Shepherd's Pie only when I was in boarding school at Albert College in Canada and it was different every time (we always used ketchup as a table condiment) because it was always made out of leftovers from the previous few days meals.
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 02, 2008 2:05 am    Post subject: Re: Baked Beans Reply with quote

Heather,
The fish? Memories of Kedgiree! Mmmmmmm.
Joy

Heather wrote:
Interesting to see so many comments - I didn't realise this dish wasn't well known in the US. It tends to be a staple in England - it's cheap & quick & children love it.

My family always used a layer of baked beans between meat & potatoes - drain the sauce from the beans and stir it into the meat with a dash of worcester sauce, instead of gravy. All sorts of tinned or left over veg can be used though, as other comments suggest.

One of the great things about the basic idea is that you can vary it in so many ways - curried meat mix or sausage & tomatoes are both good with cheesy mash for example. You can also use a layer of sliced potatoes on top instead of mashing them, if you have waxy potatoes, or use celeriac, swede, sweet potato, kohlrabi or what you will.

Incidentally the fish version, fisherman's pie, is usually made with a layer of sliced hard boiled eggs over the fish & white sauce.
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Susan
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 12, 2008 6:55 pm    Post subject: Shepherd's Pie Reply with quote

Great website! I'm looking forward to trying the different variations and tips for this recipe. My sister and I once made something like this from scratch but deciding to indulge... we added sour cream to the potatos, put a layer of finely shredded cheddar on top of them and then a thin layer of french fried onions. The onions stayed crispy and it was really good and the next day it was even better.

One question- What do you call it if it is made with a pastry? I would like to try that sometime.
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1026
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Sat Apr 12, 2008 7:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Susan -

"made with a pastry" - not entirely sure I'm understanding the question, but a "deep dish thing" with a pastry top might be more aptly a "pot pie"

chicken pot pie is the "classic" but only a few zillion parallels exist. . . .

perhaps what distinguishes "cottage pie" from "pot pie" is indeed the use of mashed potato vs. pastry as a "lid"?
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Candice11
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 16, 2008 11:50 am    Post subject: Amazing Reply with quote

I dont usually put celery in a cottage pie, but i did when using ths recipie and t was absolutly gorgous. It was a beautiful contrast to the pallet, i served a red sparkling Jacobs Creek wine with this and it was delightful. Thanks for the wonderful recipie Big smile Wink Big smile
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Pedrotski
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PostPosted: Tue May 06, 2008 12:24 pm    Post subject: Cottage (And/or Shepherds) pie. Reply with quote

Firstly, I have been popping into this site for more than a year now and have never been disappointed by the contents.

On the subject of the pies, I never slavishly follow a recipe. I believe that cooking should reflect how you feel, and I rarely feel quite the same twice. Teasing

I personally like to mash my potatoes with grated mature cheddar cheese and nothing else for this recipe, it just seems to enhance the flavour of the rest of the dish. Also, I never boil potatoes without generously salting the water first, most of the salt is poured away with the water and the potatoes taste insipid without it.

Lastly, I find that an egg, beaten with a little milk, painted over the mash with a pastry brush gives a wonderful, crispy, golden brown crust. I have also heard of people using breadcrumbs on the crust.

Thanks a lot for the site, unfortunately, I have an hour of work to go still and am now ravenous! Wink
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Guest






PostPosted: Tue May 13, 2008 1:38 pm    Post subject: Hmmm Reply with quote

I am still confused about the potatoes....I am from Mauritius and i am still unaware as to whether they are waxy or floury? Can someone please help me as to how big they should be accordingly. Here in Mauritius we have only got new potatoes. They are slighlty green and sweet.
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1026
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Tue May 13, 2008 4:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Shepard's Pie is a "dish" - a "concept" with multiple thousands of variations.

it's a similar situation as "the only way to fry eggs is: . . . . "

the dish has so much history, I doubt there is "proof" that Recipe X is the one and only "authentic" method. . . .

mashed potatoes are a usual & customary "topping" to a savory "inside"

you'll see tasty looking mentions here of vegetables in with the meat - well, other than "seasoning stuff" i.e. celery, mushrooms, green/red peppers, onion, leeks, <whatever>.... I stick with ground beef browned to a slightly crisp stage. it's not "right", it's not "wrong", it's how my family likes it.

so whatever works for you along the lines of making a mashed potato is what you go with <g> I prefer a mealy type (high starch) vs. waxy (low starch) for mashing - waxy types often mash to small chunks vs something smoother - but that is entirely personal preference.

and it is also my personal preference to do things differently now and then - steak is good, but steak every night.......
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ROBERT MARKS
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 30, 2008 1:02 am    Post subject: SHEPHERD'S PIE Reply with quote

I have always just browned my hamburger, put it in the casserole dish, add a can of veg-all on top, spread the mashed potatoes over it, cover with american cheese slices, and bake until the cheese is good and melted. That is the way my mother always made it. I just read all your coments and the original recipe. I am cooking it with the gravy, corn, and thyme right now. It sounds good. HOUSTON, TX
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Lindsey
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 25, 2008 8:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I used to have this all the time growing up in canada. I recently moved to the US and my husband has never heard of it! So, I'm making it for dinner this week and really looking forward to it. I do have one question though; There are only 2 of us and I know we'll have a lot of left overs and I would hate for any of it to go to waste. Is it possible to freeze it AFTER it's been cooked?
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1026
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Thu Sep 25, 2008 9:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

there's just two of us's and this dish is not something you need to produce 400 pounds of in one go.

cut the whole thing back;
for two, max one pound of ground beef
three medium potatoes - riced / mashed - least wash up
6 inch square casserole pan - 9 inch square max

adjust seasonings qty as needed.....

piece of cake, errrrrrrrr pie, ooooooops - shepherd's pie.....

toss a couple slices of garden ripe tomato on top.
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GUEST
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 27, 2008 10:26 am    Post subject: confused by peas Reply with quote

Hi Im a bit of a new cook and I was just wondering how to add frozen peas.
Do I need to boil them first? and at what stage should I add them?

Hope some experts can help me!

mel
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