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Baking pans--non stick??

 
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redrose



Joined: 28 Mar 2006
Posts: 7

PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2006 12:10 am    Post subject: Baking pans--non stick?? Reply with quote

I just realized all the baking pans are non-stick only since otherwise how would you make cakes? What do you think about these pans and pots? Have you heard of this brand--Silverstone? I just bought a few baking pans from this brand and began to worry if the non-stick part is not healthy. What do you think?
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1619
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2006 1:24 am    Post subject: Re: Baking pans--non stick?? Reply with quote

redrose wrote:
I just realized all the baking pans are non-stick only since otherwise how would you make cakes? What do you think about these pans and pots? Have you heard of this brand--Silverstone? I just bought a few baking pans from this brand and began to worry if the non-stick part is not healthy. What do you think?

Nonstic cookware is perfectly healthy so long as you do not overheat them and discontinue use if they begin to chip.
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GaryProtein



Joined: 26 Oct 2005
Posts: 535

PostPosted: Sat May 27, 2006 3:27 pm    Post subject: Re: Baking pans--non stick?? Reply with quote

redrose wrote:
I just realized all the baking pans are non-stick only since otherwise how would you make cakes? What do you think about these pans and pots? Have you heard of this brand--Silverstone? I just bought a few baking pans from this brand and began to worry if the non-stick part is not healthy. What do you think?


In the good old days, they used to butter and flour the pans. Also, you can use waxed or parchment paper to cover the bottom of the pan and make sure the sides are well greased. My grandmother who died 30 years ago was a great baker, and she never used non-stick anything--it was after her time.
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McDee



Joined: 17 Sep 2005
Posts: 25

PostPosted: Sat May 27, 2006 5:18 pm    Post subject: Re: Baking pans--non stick?? Reply with quote

GaryProtein wrote:
... make sure the sides are well greased.


Not always. I'd have to dig through a bunch of notes to tell you which ones, but there are certain types of cakes that will not rise properly if the sides are greased. Something about needing to stick to the sides of the pan to rise, then it pulls away as the cooking process is finished.

We use plain aluminum pans for almost everything. Most are lightly greased (pan spray) and then a parchment round in the bottom to assist with release. Its easier to pull off a bit of parchment after baking than it is to pry the cake out of the pan.
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GaryProtein



Joined: 26 Oct 2005
Posts: 535

PostPosted: Sun May 28, 2006 12:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, I agree with you McDee. My point was that non-stick is not necessary for great baking.
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Sauciercrab



Joined: 01 Jun 2006
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Thu Jun 01, 2006 7:51 am    Post subject: Re: Baking pans--non stick?? Reply with quote

GaryProtein wrote:

Also, you can use waxed or parchment paper to cover the bottom of the pan and make sure the sides are well greased.


Correct me if I'm wrong, but in using waxed paper, wouldn't the wax melt and contaminate the flavor of the food during baking? Parchment wouldn't, of course, but I had heard that waxed paper would.
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GaryProtein



Joined: 26 Oct 2005
Posts: 535

PostPosted: Thu Jun 01, 2006 12:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Actually, wax is tasteless and harmless, but typically there isn't really much wax on the paper, so it does not drip or melt all over the place. Also, there is always a thin layer of cake "film" on the waxed paper. I have never noticed wax on anything I ever baked or had any problem with it.
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Metrobake
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 12, 2006 1:54 am    Post subject: Waxed vs. Parchment Reply with quote

Waxed paper is coated with -- you guessed it -- wax. Parchment is coated with silicone, which is heat resistant and waterproof, meaning it does not degrade when it gets wet, and it doesn't melt until it gets much hotter than normal baking temperatures. (This is why all of the "new" potholders and baking pans are made of silicone.)

Parchment is re-usable if you are baking cookies (just flip it over or pick a different spot), waxed paper is not.

For delicate cookies, you may prefer not to have a waxy coating on the bottom.

Use waxed paper for cold things; parchment for baking.

Forget about the roll of parchment you buy at the store -- it just curls up and has to be "glued" down on the corners for cookies, plus it's expensive -- visit your local restaurant supply company and buy a box of 1000 flat sheets. It should cost around $45.00 for the smaller sheets. A box will last a long long time (or you can split it with a friend).

Or you could by 2 Silpats. . .

Regards,
M.B.
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Guest





PostPosted: Tue Dec 12, 2006 11:27 am    Post subject: Re: Baking pans--non stick?? Reply with quote

dear redrose, did you know that teflon used for non sticky frying fans was invented by mistake. it is actually a polymer plastic that can stand to a high temperature and i don't think its dangerous to health.

from a filipino engineer in seoul, korea.

redrose wrote:
I just realized all the baking pans are non-stick only since otherwise how would you make cakes? What do you think about these pans and pots? Have you heard of this brand--Silverstone? I just bought a few baking pans from this brand and began to worry if the non-stick part is not healthy. What do you think?
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SirSpice



Joined: 04 Dec 2006
Posts: 95

PostPosted: Fri Dec 15, 2006 5:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't have a single teflon coated baking pan at home, but I have seen a few instances when I wish I hadl.

Muffin pans and cake pans with designs are a hassle to grease properly (and I don't like the flavor of cooking spray). I once made a mistake greasing a muffin tin and and to work half an hour to get the cupcakes out.

Also, the polymer fume thing only becomes relavent at temperatues of almost 600 degrees F. Home ovens don't go that high, and I can't think of any pastry but pizza which you would need such a hot oven for (and pizza dosen't stick anyway).
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Guest






PostPosted: Tue Aug 21, 2007 5:55 am    Post subject: I switched to regular metal pans for baking Reply with quote

I don't trust the so called non-stick, they start to wear off so quickly. I swear they do it on purpose so you have to buy new ones often. I got fed up w/ my "non-stick" muffin pan and now I grease lightly and flour for all my baking. It works so much better and cakes and muffins are more tender too. I also gave up on paper muffin cups because so much stays on the darn paper. Greasing and flouring is the way to go.

Btw, my metal cookie pans don't stick, but the teflon ones quickly did. Unfortunately, teflon dominates the market and metal bakeware is harder to find, but I got my beloved cookie pans at the big Independant Grocers.I'm in Ottawa Canada, not sure where this site is based.
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johannabartley



Joined: 03 Dec 2007
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Mon Dec 03, 2007 6:53 pm    Post subject: non-stick pans Reply with quote

I don't need only non-stick pans to make pancakes but I also need a non-stick sealing because that's the place my pancakes end when I try to turn them around. I guess engineers are not "programmed" to use pans, just design them Wink
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bsdwork



Joined: 29 Dec 2007
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Sat Dec 29, 2007 2:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I find the TEFAL pans the best! Your pancakes won't get stuck !
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