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The malliard reaction when searing a piece of meat
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1616
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Tue May 08, 2007 4:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think Guest was responding to Eltonyo who first made the statement that the maillard reaction only applies to meat. Guest was presenting a counter example.
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eltonyo



Joined: 02 Nov 2005
Posts: 88
Location: WA

PostPosted: Thu May 24, 2007 3:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Actually, if one bothers to read my complete response, I said the following, in regards to the Malliard Reaction:

if ya wanna get really anal (and technical).... "caramelization" is ONLY the browning of sucrose (table sugar!). the browning you see when you cook some bread or other starches (that are made up of simple sugars), is actually another malliard reaction that involves real sugars, that is different from meat. for some reason, the wikipedia includes these other sugars as a true caramelization reaction, but with a different temperature. i beg to differ... but its now an accepted cooking adaption.... and so be it. but even this stretched form of the word includes only fruits and vegetables... under no circumstance can you caramelize meat.

so like i said, the mallaird reaction goes beyond proteins, but it is most exclusely used, in regards to the protein reaction in meats.

did you catch what i said above.... (light-years ago)... I said this reaction goes beyond protein (and meats), and involves other carbo sugars. but the definition, per se, is usually used to describe meats high in protein.

y'all have to read, and interpret things in context, and in order.


and the bacon... that beautiful bacon... gets "caramelized!" via the malliard reaction! .... (kosher style)

!)[/i]

- Tony (hahahahaaaa... "kosher style"!)

p.s. and sue me, for spelling "maillard", with the word "malliard" sometimes.... and caramelize my arse for trying to explain this stuff.

:Smile)


Last edited by eltonyo on Mon Oct 06, 2008 10:41 pm; edited 1 time in total
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moses
Guest





PostPosted: Tue Jul 24, 2007 11:24 am    Post subject: browning Reply with quote

WATT wrote:


Maillard reactions occur in our own bodies (see AGE) at ~40C in the presence of much water. Reactions occurring faster at elevated temperatures is basic thermodynamics, as is the necessity to overcome the activation energy barrier. But occurring at low temperatures in the presence of water is a fact.

Watt


can you point me in the direciton of some refs that back up the low temperature browning. I am interested in this type of reaction and the time points requiered to achieve it
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Watt
Guest





PostPosted: Mon Aug 13, 2007 2:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

look at braising.
A braise is (usually) a meat cooked on the bone (ie whole piece, rather than cut up) in a little water and a little fat. The idea is that the cooking liquid should only be half way up the meat, and the braising pan covered to reduce water loss. It is usual in Western kitchens to braise in a low oven (below the temperature that is usually quoted for the Maillard reactin to occur). The meat that is out of the water will brown over time, that in the cooking liquid will not. However, if the meat is turned, the part that was in the liquid will brown, and that in the liquid will dissolve/disperse to form a brown gravy. Turning several times will accomplish more browning, obviously.
Also google 'age maillard', or 'advanced glycation end products' for body temperature Maillard reactions.
HTH
just thoughts
Watt
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Ayenti Hwann
Guest





PostPosted: Sun Dec 16, 2007 11:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

eltonyo wrote:
the mallaird reaction goes beyond proteins, but it is most exclusely used, in regards to the protein reaction in meats.


Actually, the Maillard reaction is mentioned a lot in regards to the production of melanoidins in beer- even more than I've heard it mentioned in regards to meat.
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pbone



Joined: 05 Jan 2008
Posts: 99
Location: Dutchess County, NYS

PostPosted: Wed Jan 16, 2008 9:11 pm    Post subject: powdered sugaring the steak Reply with quote

My mother used to dust thick sirloin steaks with powdered sugar and let them sit for a couple of hours, turning and dusting side two, before cooking over charcoal fire grill. The sugar flames and burns, and the steak is charred -utilizing both carmelizing and malliardizing, if I'm not mistaken - and makes possible a delicious, slightly sweet, charred exterior and rare interior...If you don't mention the powdered sugar, no one will know, so you won't have guests recoiling in horror at the very idea. This is a method of quick charring without overcooking interior.
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GaryProtein



Joined: 26 Oct 2005
Posts: 535

PostPosted: Fri Jan 18, 2008 3:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

^^^^The Honey Baked Ham company uses a similar method for their glaze. They sprinkle on brown sugar with whatever else is in their secret concoction and use a torch to melt the sugar into the hard crisp glaze.
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SirShazar



Joined: 30 Jul 2007
Posts: 89

PostPosted: Fri Jan 18, 2008 5:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

When I make burgers, I season them with salt, pepper, and a bit of brown sugar. I also make them really thin but with a large circumference. The thinness of the patty and that little bit of sugar makes them crispy when they come off the grill; pair that with a toasted kaiser roll and you got a burger I could love.
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Guest






PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2008 4:15 pm    Post subject: Watt Reply with quote

try using fructose instead of sugar, fructose is a reducing sugar, and will undergo Maillard reactions, sugar will not (until converted to glucose and fructose). Works well with any meat, especially chicken.
thoughts
Watt
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