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RE: Garlic Press.

 
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rodel69
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 22, 2006 9:36 pm    Post subject: RE: Garlic Press. Reply with quote

The 99Ę Store is an excellent source for kitchen utinsiles, spices and numerous other items. I have a 99Ę garlic press that has holes 1/8 in., in diameter. The paste that it produces is as fine as the smaller holed, more expensive garlic presses. And, cleaning is a snap, it only requires rinsing under a strong stream of cold water.
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Guest






PostPosted: Thu Mar 23, 2006 1:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Or, instead of cleaning it, you could throw it out and spend a buck for a new one!
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Matt



Joined: 30 Mar 2006
Posts: 21

PostPosted: Thu Mar 30, 2006 5:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I too have had great luck with the dollar store. I got a wide metal spoon that has served me well in making pasta sauces with meat.

If you want to spend a little more for a neat garlic-related tool, I'd suggest the Garlic Mincer from Lee Valley Tools. I've got one, and the nice part is you don't end up killing your hand when trying to crush a large and/or particularly dense piece of garlic.
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GaryProtein



Joined: 26 Oct 2005
Posts: 535

PostPosted: Sat Apr 15, 2006 4:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I got a gadget at Williams Sonoma that looks like a vegetable peeler, only it has an extremely sharp blade, that I removed and re-sharpened to be scalpel sharp. The blade has a vernier screw that allows you to adjust the thickness of the slices. You just run the cloves over the blade and you get slices ranging from 100 um to 2 mm in thickness. This makes it easy to slice the garlic into ultra thins slices that almost melt while exuding the flavor into the food, and the slices do not clump together in the frying pan, like when you use a press. You do need to be careful not to slice too far down because your fingertip will become one of the slices if you aren't careful!

I wish I knew exactly what they called it, but if you go to one of their stores or check their website, you should be able to find it. I think it was about 10-15 dollars.


edit: I just found out, it was a truffle slicer. Works great.


Last edited by GaryProtein on Tue Oct 03, 2006 2:04 pm; edited 1 time in total
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cncmike



Joined: 11 May 2006
Posts: 6
Location: Burlington Canada

PostPosted: Thu May 11, 2006 3:18 am    Post subject: Microplaner... Reply with quote

I find pressed garlic gets bitter when cooked as the oils you want are often pressed into the device, try a MICROPLANER and you will never press again. It minces so finely that you can use half as much as get more flavour as the oils stay in the cells and end up in your dish not all smushed into the press...MB
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John
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PostPosted: Wed May 31, 2006 3:25 am    Post subject: Zyliss Susi Reply with quote

The Zyliss "Susi" garlic press is as near to perfection as is possible in this world.

Operates easily, cleans easily, creates the perfect texture (not the mush that comes out of most presses), and you don't even have to peel the garlic clove. Use it once, and you'll never consider using anything else.

As an engineer, I bow in deep respect to the designers of this little wonder.
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youngcook



Joined: 11 Apr 2007
Posts: 97
Location: GA

PostPosted: Wed Apr 18, 2007 2:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dollar store? Too cheap. I got an Oneida press at a kitchen store for $9.It works great. I also clean it by running it under water. But don't throw it out and get a new one. Save your money. $1 a week is $4 a month and $48 in a year.$48 times 20 years is $960 which added to your other money and put in mutual funds and the bank can get you a few thousands and let you retire earlier (even though the government will steal a lot from you.) And then by the time you do retire you will be rich.
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Thor



Joined: 24 Jul 2006
Posts: 112
Location: Camp Hill, PA

PostPosted: Mon Apr 23, 2007 9:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Iím not fond of presses, or the mush they produce. And there is always something that looks like a bodily excretion stuck in it.

My sis-in-law gave me a Garlic Genius from Williams-Sonoma which she claims she didnít spend the full $39 for, as I never would have. It uses a screw mechanism to push 2-3 cloves thru a heavy stainless mesh and to turn a blade to lop off the strands of garlic as they exit the mesh. Itís like twisting a pepper mill to produce cute, neat cubes of garlic. The entire gizmo disassembles and is dishwasher safe, which is very cool. Unfortunately, I donít care for how large those cubes are, so I use it only occasionally.

Mostly, I chop my garlic the old fashion way: with a knife. Itís not hard and it really doesnít take very long, usually less time than it takes me to remove the papery covering. I can control the size and consistency of the finished product to match my liking, or to match the size of other ingredients, like ginger.
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GaryProtein



Joined: 26 Oct 2005
Posts: 535

PostPosted: Tue Apr 24, 2007 2:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I noticed recently on one of my trips to Williams-Sonoma, that they have a drum type garlic slicer that works like a small hand crank type cheese grater, only instead of having teeth the pass by and grate, there is a razor sharp blade on the drum that slices the garlic so you don't have to worry about slicing off your fingertips!
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youngcook



Joined: 11 Apr 2007
Posts: 97
Location: GA

PostPosted: Wed Apr 25, 2007 2:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good. I am afraid at times of slicing garlic. In fact, I have almost sliced off my fingers.Yikes! Big smile
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Only Cookware



Joined: 20 May 2007
Posts: 8

PostPosted: Sun May 20, 2007 1:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I quite like my Tupperware garlic crusher. Can't remember how much it was but it wasn't terribly cheap but it does a good job.
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EngineeringProfessor



Joined: 07 Sep 2006
Posts: 77

PostPosted: Wed May 23, 2007 4:30 am    Post subject: Oxo press works for me Reply with quote

I use an Oxo and have found that the ergonomic soft handles and the built-in hole cleaner that helps clear the left-over strandy stuff from the chamber works great. The press part is heavy and thick, so the edges of the holes cut like knives. Dishwasher cleanup. It is a well engineered device.
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David Glover
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 22, 2007 1:39 pm    Post subject: Garlic press Reply with quote

I usually use the traditional method I was taught: put a small pile of sea salt on a cutting board, lay the garlic on it and progressively mash it with the back of a knife.

I think the salt is just to hold it in place (though it obviously adds to the flavour of the dish).

No additional utensils! (Though I may hunt down the Zyliss so I can avoid peeling the cloves - I do dislike that!).

David
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Watt
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 22, 2007 2:09 pm    Post subject: Re: Garlic press Reply with quote

David Glover wrote:
I usually use the traditional method I was taught: put a small pile of sea salt on a cutting board, lay the garlic on it and progressively mash it with the back of a knife.

I think the salt is just to hold it in place (though it obviously adds to the flavour of the dish).

No additional utensils! (Though I may hunt down the Zyliss so I can avoid peeling the cloves - I do dislike that!).

David


I think the salt is to act as an abrasive. Also works just as well without the salt!
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the_bleachman



Joined: 13 Dec 2005
Posts: 15
Location: Republic of Panama

PostPosted: Wed Jun 27, 2007 1:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I use a smooth rock. Besides being the truly traditional way to squish things in the kitchen, it works great, easy to clean and also useful to hit things with.

Leo
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