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Latest Post on Michael's Blog: Fixing SONOS "Unable to play" song / "Unable to connect" to local music library problem on Windows 7
Equipment & Gear
Test Recipes
Sorry, I dropped the ball this week and only just realized a couple hours ago that Thermoworks offered to give away a Thermapen if I ran a giveaway contest that ended this Saturday (tomorrow)! I think this will be the third year in a row that I'll be able to give away the best thermometer I've ever used for cooking. This post will be short so I can get it up quickly, but read on to see how to enter the drawing which will take place on the evening of December 13, 2014.
This year flew past so fast that I didn't even realize that next week is Thanksgiving. I've been offered a new product from Thermoworks to giveaway, and we're going to have to rush this giveaway to have it in time to be received by a lucky winner in time for Thanksgiving. The product is their brand new DOT probe alarm thermometer. If you're familiar with the ChefAlarm which I reviewed and gave away earlier this year, then this new product is similar - except it does only one thing and it does it well: monitor the temperature of the probe and sounds an alarm when the temperature reaches the set point. No count down timers, no count up timers, no alarm start or stop... just set the target temperature and you're done. Sometimes simple is just what is needed.
Equipment & Gear
Equipment & Gear
A kitchen scale is an essential tool in every kitchen. Most American kitchens have a set of measuring cups, but don't have a kitchen scale. Even though kitchen scales aren't that common to the American kitchen, Amazon.com still has over 200 scales for sale ranging from $7 to over $300. Is this a gadget that only perfectionist chefs and constant bakers need? No, give a good scale a try and you'll find that it's a better and faster way to cook.
In 2005, a family owned business headed by inventor Larry Mackiewicz started to sell a tabletop cooling device called the CoolCover. The problem it solved was straightforward: how do you serve foods that should be chilled? The traditional answer to that problem is often unattractive and messy. Fill a large tub with crushed ice and place the chilled food in the ice. For foods that need to be kept below 40°F, the ice method is still the best around, but for foods that only need to be served chilled or kept lower than the ambient temperature, the CoolCover is certainly one of the better solutions.
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